Archive

September 5th, 2003

Society President Clarifies Waiver and Medical Release Policies for Minors

Meg Baron, President of the SCA, has published a clarification of policy on waivers and medical release forms for minors, including those attending events without a parent or guardian present on site.

Salford Manor House Named Britain's Oldest Continuously Occupied Home

A manor house in Somerset, thought to date to before 1150, has been named the longest continuously occupied home in Britain.

September 4th

Romans May Have Worn Socks With Their Sandals

A foot from a Roman-era statue was found in London -- wearing a sock under a sandal.

Twentieth Issue Allowed to Escape, Populace Recoils in Horror

The Quarter: The repeat offenders at The Quarter have once again failed in their attempt to prevent the escape of a new issue.

September 3rd

Footprint of Jamestown Fort Found

Hampton Roads Daily Press: Archaeologists working on the site of the James Fort, in Jamestown, VA, have announced that they have for the first time been able to map the exact location, shape, and size of the 1607 structure, the first permanent English settlement in America.

Roman Vase a Renaissance Fake?

The Portland Vase, a key piece in the British Museum's collection of Roman treasures may actually be a clever Renaissance fake.

September 2nd

Duke Sir Skapti Thorinson Victorious in An Tir Crown Tourney

Duke Sir Skapti Thorinson, inspired by Greifyna Asa Starradottir, was the victor of An Tir's Crown Tournament Saturday.

Elizabethan Life in the Present Tense

Presenting the life and times of the Elizabethan age has been made easier through the "Life in Elizabethan England- A Compendium of Common Knowledge" written by Maggie Pierce Secara, known Mistress M

Was Chaucer Murdered?

History News Network: A new book by Terry Jones and Dr. Alan Fletcher implies the author may have been murdered for his religious and political beliefs.

Da Vinci Painting Stolen

"The Madonna with the Yarnwinder" was stolen from Drumlanrig Castle, in southern Scotland.

September 1st

Newport Ship Mystery May be Solved

IC Wales: The mystery surrounding the identity of a 15th century ship discovered last year in Newport, Wales may have been solved.

Mittion Victorious in Trimaris Crown Tourney

Duke Mittion von Weald has won the right to crown his lady, Brighid Caileen of the Moors, as Queen of Trimaris.

Burial Mounds, Cistercian Abbey, Chapel and Medieval Cemetery Unearthed near Chester

IC Northwales: Excavations of a site near the Duke of Westminster's Eaton estate in Chester, England may provide work for archaeologists for many years. A new dig shows that the area has known human habitation dating back 9,000 years.

1st Century Jewish Farmhouse Discovered Near Ptora in Israel

Haaretz.com: Contractors working on the Trans-Israel Highway have found the remains of a first century Jewish farmhouse.

Razed 16th Century Mosque Straddled 10th Century Hindu Temple

AFP: Indian archaeologists have found a medieval Hindu temple under the remains of an Islamic shrine that was razed by Hindus in 1992, a report unveiled in court said.

August 31st

Irish Archaeologist Unearths "Find of his Life"

U TV: A 6"x10" bronze shrine, originally constructed to hold a bell, has been discovered at an excavation of Celtic site bear Ballycastle in Northern Ireland.

Tourists Banned from China's Great Wall

Large sections of the Great Wall of China have been closed to tourists due to detereoration.

August 30th

North African Coin Discovered in Lincolnshire

Lincolnshire Echo: An amateur archaeologist discovered a Roman coin minted in North Africa in a farmer's field near Lincoln, England.

9th Century Church May be Birthplace of Christianity in Bulgaria

Novinite: Archaeologists have discovered a 9th century church which may be the site of the conversion of Bulgaria's first Christian ruler, Boris I.

August 29th

Crusader Castle Littered & Neglected

The Daily Star (Lebanon): Beaufort Castle, above the village of Arnoun in Lebanon, was fortified by the Crusaders in the 12th century. Today, following years of use of the castle as a helicopter base and an observation post, it has accumulated much trash and debris.

Vatican Letter Proves Pope's Involvement in Galileo Case

Zenit: A letter, recently-discovered in the Vatican archives, shows the involvement of pope Urban VIII in the trial of Galileo.

Skeletons Discovered Beneath Public Library

Sunday Herald: The discovery of 50 skeletons in a shallow grave beneath the public library in St. Andrews, Scotland, leads archaeologists to believe that the town may be situated over a vast medieval cemetery.

August 28th

SCAdians can Shop Online with iGive.com and Support the SCA!

Tracey Stoever, Corporate Development Officer for the SCA, Inc. reports on new opportunities for those wishing to donate to the SCA - online shopping with hundreds of vendors through iGive.com.

The Met Hosts Exhibit on 17th Century Chinese Landscape Paintings

"Dreams of Yellow Mountain: Landscapes of Survival in Seventeenth-Century China" will be open at the Galleries for Chinese Painting and Calligraphy at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City from September 13, 2003, through January 25, 2004.

Experiencing the Times [Pennsic]

Youngstown Vindicator: The Youngstown (Ohio) Vindicator has published an article about the Pennsic War.

Descendants of Last Aztec Emperor Seek Pensions Promised in 16th century

AFP: The descendants of Moctezuma II, the last Aztec emperor of Mexico, are trying to recover the pensions granted them in 1550 and suspended in 1934.

More Photos from Pennsic 32

Raven of Drachenwald shares photos from Pennsic 32.

Lengthy Breastfeeding May have Contributed to the Health of Medieval Babies

News Telegraph: A study of the bones from an abandoned medieval village may prove that English babies thrived due to lengthy breast-feeding.

Public Bathing Returns to Bath

Telegraph.co.uk: The city of Bath, known throughout British history for its public baths, will again offer bathing to its hoards of tourists.

August 27th

Mongolia's Cult of Ghengis Khan

Under Mongolia's former Communist rulers, the mere mention of the name of Ghengis Khan was outlawed. Now there is no escaping him.