Archive - Sep 2012

September 4th

Claimant to British throne dies at 71

If things had gone differently in the 15th century, Michael Abney-Hastings, the 14th Earl of Loudoun, would have been King of England. Instead, he worked as a forklift driver in New South Wales, Australia until his death recently at the age of 71.

16th century social networking

A team of experts from the University of London, Royal Holloway, and the British Library and Reading University has discovered documents to prove that 16th century Italian Academies created networks to share information.

September 3rd

Roman Brits enjoyed a "refined diet"

Ongoing excavations at the Silchester Roman Town in Hampshire, England show that Roman citizens in the area seasoned their food with spices imported from the Mediterranean, and enjoyed foods such as olives, celery and dill, native to warmer climes.

Scottish walkers revive ancient pilgrimage

"Pilgrimage is about remembering 'our journey toward heaven,'" said Cardinal Keith O'Brien who recently led a group on the ancient pilgrimage from Edinburgh to St Andrews, Scotland.

The memorable Elizabethans

In a recent review for the New York Times, James Shapiro looks at The Elizabethans by A. N. Wilson, which chronicles the lives of a number of eminent men and women of late Tudor times "who made the age so memorable, including the most remarkable of them all, Queen Elizabeth."

September 2nd

Medieval documents from five Jerusalem libraries to be available online

The Arabic Manuscripts Digital Library of Jerusalem reports that it will make thousands of Arabic language documents, dating to the early Islamic era, available to access on the internet.

Sexaginta Prista to receive facelift

The Roman heritage of the Balkans is about to get a boost with an EU-funded renovation project of the Roman fortress Sexaginta Prista near the city of Ruse, Bulgaria.

Wolsey's Gate "tagged" with graffiti

Wolsey's Gate, a Tudor tower built by Cardinal Thomas Wolsey in Ipswich, England, was the subject of vandalism recently when the 16th century brickwork was covered by graffiti.

September 1st

Durham University prepares for arrival of the Lindisfarne Gospels

Officials at Durham Cathedral and University are readying themselves for the arrival of the 1,300-year-old Lindisfarne Gospels at the university in 2013, with such activities as a concert by the newly formed Lindisfarne Gospels Community Choir.

Evidence of medieval spectacles found in book

On the blog Cultural Compass, an employee of the Harry Ransom Center chronicles the discovery of rare evidence of medieval eyeglasses, not in an illustration, but in the end pages of a book.

Whitehall Roman Villa dig completed

In 1996, archaeologists began the investigation of Whitehall Farm in Northamptonshire, England, and were pleased to find coins and pottery buried beneath the farmland. Now, in 2012, the Whitehall Farm Roman Villa and Landscape Project has been completed. (photo)