Archive - Oct 2012

October 18th

[CAI] Black Oak Lodge 2013

With the winter swift approaching the Shire of Darach raises a call to arms asking all those who would brave the harrowing winter chill to join us in defending the newly christened halls of our Black Oak Lodge 2.0 from an impending ice weasel invasion. We have warm beds and hot

Masculinity in the Middle Ages

Dr Pat Cullum and Dr Katherine Lewis of the University of Huddersfield are hoping to learn more about what it meant to be a man in the Middle Ages. To foster scholarship, the two professor have created a new network, called the Bishop's Eye.

October 17th

[WES] A German Michaelmas!

Glücklich Festtag! (Happy Feast Day!) The winds of the Arctic are blowing from the North and the season of Harvest is drawing to a close. Join us on Saturday, Oct. 20th, at the GoldStream Community Center near Fairbanks, as Winter’s Gate celebrates the fruits of Harvest with a
feast in the style of Medieval Germany.

[EAL] Ealdormere Crown Tourney XXX

The Barony of Rising Waters is pleased to host Ealdormere Crown Tourney XXX

Exhibit honors founder of Metropolitan Museum of Art's armor collection

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is putting on  show  “Bashford Dean and the Creation of the Arms and Armor Department” in honor of the founding curator, Bashford Dean, of their medieval arms and armor collection.

October 16th

Application Extension - Corporate Treasurer

Please be advised that the deadline for applications for the position of Corporate Treasurer has been extended until December 30, 2012.

Application Extension - Society President

Please be advised that the deadline for applications for the position of Society President has been extended until December 30, 2012.

October 15th

Anthropologist analyzes effects of the Black Death

USC professor Sharon DeWitte is steeped in death, specifically the Black Death that ravaged Europe during the 14th century. DeWitte is studying how conditions in Europe before and after the plague and the effects of the disease on the lifespan of survivors changed life in medieval Europe.

Archaeologists hope to recover medieval shipwreck in the Danube

The blue Danube's not-very-blue waters are a hindrance to Hungarian archaeologists seeking to investigate a newly-discovered medieval shipwreck in the river 18 miles north of Budapest. The Danube connected much of Europe in the Middle Ages, but was hazardous to navigate.

October 14th

Dwynwen's church to be restored

Santes Dwynwen, daughter of Welsh King Brychan Brycheiniog, who died in the 5th century, is considered the patron saint of Welsh lovers. Now a ruined church at Llanddwyn on Anglesey has been scheduled for restoration.

Oxfordshire Museum displays Anglo Saxon brooch

Until the end of December, 2012, the Oxfordshire Museum is proudly exhibiting a 7th century garnet and gold brooch discovered in a woman's grave in Oxfordshire in 2009. (photo)

Port near Birka larger than previously believed

Marine archaeologists working at a port near the ancient village of Birka, Sweden believe the port was larger than previously believed and may show evidence of the exensive trade system of the Norse.

October 13th

York Mystery Plays community project

"At times you feel like you're looking at a huge film set with masses of people on stage, all pulling in the same direction, creating big pictures," says director Paul Burbridge about a new production of the 14th century York Mystery Plays.

EMERAUDE, a magazine for poetry and fiction, open for submissions

EMERAUDE (ISSN 2169-0952), a magazine for poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and art of interest to the Living History community, has reopened for submissions.

Henry VIII's Crown and Pew

Henry VIII's crown has been recreated for display at Hampton Court in the newly restored "Royal Pew" in the Chapel Royal.

October 12th

Roman border walls

Most students of Roman history are familiar with Hadrian's Wall in northern Britain, but Roman border walls can be found throughout what was once the Roman Empire. Andrew Curry of National Geographic Magazine has the feature story.

Early Irish monastery discovery "beyond wildest dreams"

Archaeologists are excited by the discovery of an early medieval monastery in Carrowmore, Co Donegal, Ireland. The site was previously known as an early Christian settlement, but the discovery of a circular boundary wall leads experts to believe that a monastery was located there.

Saxon "paupers' cemetery" found under British construction site

The remains of a 9th-10th century church and its graveyard have been discovered during construction along the Ipswich, England waterfront. 300 graves, consisting largely of very old and very young bodies, were found, exceeding the expectations of researchers who knew that a church might exist on the site.

New study shows Scotland "one of the most diverse nations on earth"

Conventional wisdom states that most of the Scottish population stems from Scots, Celtic, Viking and Irish ancestry, but a new DNA study shows something quite interesting. Many Scots carry genetics originating in West African, Arabian, south-east Asian and Siberia.

October 11th

Duchess Onora inghean mhic Chathain elevated to Pelican

Duchess Onora inghean mhic Chathain was set on vigil for the Pelican during the last court of TRM Uther and Kenna, in Gleann Abhann.

October 10th

Volunteers encouraged to help excavate Roman bath house

Archaeologists from the Grampus Heritage team are encouraging volunteers to take part in excavations to uncover a Roman bath house at the Derventio site near Papcastle, England. “This is genuinely a once in a lifetime opportunity because I don’t believe you will see something like this again in my lifetime.," said Mark Graham, project manager.

Operation Nightingale unearths thoursands of artifacts on Salisbury plain

A team of volunteers from Operation Nightingale, a project to give soldiers recovering from injuries in Afghanistan a chance to gains new skills and interests, has unearthed an "astonishing" haul of artifacts on the Salisbury Plain.

Another Saturday night with the Scots and Roman legions

Stracathro Fort near Stirling, Scotland, the world’s most northerly Roman fort, may have been served by a wine bar or pub. Archaeologists woring on the Roman Gas Project discovered a settlement adjacent to the fort including "a large square room – the equivalent of a public bar – and fronted on to a paved area, akin to a modern beer garden."

October 9th

"People of Medieval Scotland" documents individuals from 1093 - 1314

Scotland's Education Secretary Mike Russell has launched a database charting life in medieval Scotland between 1093 and 1314 with software designed to be used in schools. The database was created at the University of Glasgow.

Richard III Society hopes to rewrite English history

Winston Churcill wrote, "History is written by the victors." So believe the members of the Richard III Society who feel that the Tudors - including Shakespeare, who worked for them - maligned the memory of King Richard for their own purposes.

Discovered village offers "a glimpse of rural 13th Century life"

Archaeologists have begun work on a site near Bromyard, England where they believe they will find the remains of a medieval village. "It may be part of a village called Studmarsh, on land known as the Grove."

October 8th

Driving Russia's Golden Ring

Despite the aggrevation of Russia's roads,  a road trip around the country's Golden Ring, "a circuit of about 10 ancient towns northeast of Moscow, each with its own set of glittering onion-domed churches and medieval fortresses," can be rewarding. Freelance writer iand a former Moscow correspondent for The New York Times, Celestine Bohlen, discusses her recent trip.

Development threatens War of the Roses battlefield

The Northampton Borough Council in Northampton, England is eager to turn over the 85-acre Delapre Park to sports club for their use, but there's a glitch. The park may be the site of a decisve battle between the Houses of York and Lancaster in 1460.

Fly like a falcon

Falconers in Abu Dhabi have created a mini helmet cam designed to allow viewers to experience the flight and hunt of a falcon. A short video reveals what it's like to "fly like a falcon."

October 7th

Archaeologists explore Vindolanda's water system

In 1930, Prof Eric Birley first recorded the pipework for the water supply at the Roman fort Vindolanda in Northumberland, England. Recently his grandson, Dr Andrew Birley, continued the legacy by identifying the spring-head and piping system for the fort.