Archive - 2011

December 1st

[MID] Grand Tournament

To all Kings, Princes, knights and gentles of cote armor, greetings. Know that upon the 3rd day of December in the two thousand and eleventh year of our Lord, by leave of His most noble majesty Eikbrandr, a Grande Tournament will be held in the Barony of Cynnabar.

Metropolitan Museum of Art reopens Islamic galleries

For eight years, the vast collections of Islamic art at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art has been unavailable to the public, but now visitors can enjoy the collection as never before. Holland Cotter of the New York Times has a review.

[ANS] Stargate Yule

Please join us in our celebration of the season of celebrations! A day of pageantry! A day of fun!

[CAL] Clothier's Seminar

The Clothier's Seminar is an annual event that revolves around the one necessity that
we all need, clothes. Come join us for a day of classes, discussion and camaraderie.

[CAI] Roman Armor Workshop

ROMAN ARMOR WORKSHOP in Lyondomere DEC 3, 2011 10am-6pm near S La Tijera and W Manchester

[DRA] Polderslot Winterfeast 2012

There wil be a Winterfeast in the shire of Polderslot! Please come join us for lots of fun and games, dancing, singing, fighting and more. There will also be plenty to do for children.

[OUT] War Practice

On Sunday December 4 Unser Hafen will be hosting a War Practice in Fort Collins, CO from 10am-2pm. This is the day after Windkeep's Hunter's Feast event. We hope to see many fighters for a good day of melees.

Orkney Hood re-created

"The project took five and half months and a total of 230 hours to actually make it. But it is fascinating to do something like that. We have not got any garments at all like this, only scraps if we are lucky," said experimental archaeologist Jacqui Wood about her re-creation of the Orkney Hood.

Photos from 100 Minutes War

Cateline la broderesse reports that she has posted an album of photos from 100 Minutes War which took place recently in the Kingdom of the East. The photos are available on PicasaWeb.

Renaissance portraiture showcased in Met exhibit

Those interested in Renaissance portraiture and costuming may want to visit the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art's exhibit The Renaissance Portrait from Donatello to Bellini December 21, 2011–March 18, 2012.

November 30th

British Male Progeniture and Act of Settlement overturned

A vote by the 16 members of the British Commonwealth has allowed a daughter of William and Catherine the possibility to ascend to the British throne. The rule of male primogeniture, giving males precedence over females in British royalty, dating to 1689, was recently overturned.

Mongol shipwreck might be part of invasion force

In the 13th century, Mongol leader and Chinese ruler Kublai Khan attempted to invade Japan. A witness to the ill-fated attempt may have been found off the coast of Nagasaki in the form of a nearly-intact Chinese ship.

SCA adds spectacle to University of Wisconsin campus

The Wisconsin State Journal follows the Barony of  Jararvellir to their fighter practice at the UW-Madison Stock Pavilion. Here students and non-students gather to fight, fence, work on armor, and show off.

Calontir's Queen's Prize photos online

Vilhelm reports that he has created four albums of photos from Queen's Prize, which took place place recently in the Kingdom of Calontir. The photos are available on Flickr.

November 29th

Five-year York Hungate dig comes to an end in December, 2011

Archaeologists are beginning to pack up their tools five years after the excavation of York, England's Hungate dig began. In 2012, the York Archaeological Trust will turn the 2,500 sq m (26,900 sq ft) excavation over to developers for a modern housing project.

14th century hand cannon demonstrated

In a 9-minute video, members of the Springfield Arsenal, LLC go "medieval" by demonstrating a 14th century 3-Barrel Rapid-Fire Pole Cannon, a black powder device fired by striking against a surface.

Dining in Narnia

What if Anthony Bourdain, the caustic host of the Travel Channel's No Reservations, visited C.S. Lewis' Narnia? Fan writer Edo no Hana of An Archive of Our Own, thinks she knows.

Subjects placed on vigil at AEthelmearc's Agincourt

Maestra Giulietta da Venezia reports that, at Their Court Their Majesties, Isenwulf and Rosalinda, King and Queen of AEthelmear, served  Writs of Summons on two of Their subjects, Baron Thomas Byron of Haverford and THLady Hilderun Hugelmann.

"Crisis in the Byzantine Empire" may have brought about the First Crusade

Everyone knows that the First Crusade began with a call from Pope Urban II to free Jerusalem from the Muslims. That is, everyone but British historian Peter Frankopan, whose new book, The First Crusade: the Call from the East, offers a different explanation.

November 28th

St. John's Bible completed

Nearly thirteen years ago, calligrapher Donald Jackson began an epic project to create a hand-written Bible, commissioned by St. John’s University in Minnesota. Now, with a final "Amen," the Bible has been completed. Michael Inbar of Today.com has the story. (video)

Vikings invade England in the 21st century

Recent Nordic archaeological discoveries in Great Britain have sparked a new interest in all things Viking. In an article for the Guardian, arts and media correspondent Vanessa Thorpe looks at new trends, based on old tales that are driving current British culture.

Help identify the Staffordshire Hoard "mystery object"

It's beautiful, but what is it? Archaeologists are asking that question about three gold and silver pieces from the Staffordshire Hoard that fit together. Guesses include a saddle fitting and the decorative terminal to a parchment scroll. (photos)

Murder at the Feast of St. Hedwig photos online

Vilhelm Lich reports that he has created several albums of photos from Murder at the Feast of St. Hedwig which took place recently in the Kingdom of Calontir. The photos are available on Flickr.

November 27th

Why red and green at Christmas?

As the Christmas season draws near, the colors red and green can be found everywhere, but who decided that these two colors should be associated with Christmas? Cambridge research scientist Dr Spike Bucklow believes he knows.

Pin-pointing Hastings

Battle Abbey and its surrounds, the traditional site of the Battle of Hastings between King Harold and William the Conqueror, may not be the actual site of the battle, according to a new book by Nick Austin, Secrets Of The Norman Invasion.

Medieval corpses help construct plague genetic code

An international team of researchers has reconstructed the genetic code of the Black Death using DNA extracted from the teeth of medieval corpses buried in a graveyard in London's East Smithfield. Their research has been published in the science journal Nature.

November 26th

99 Danish thanes

For those old enough to have grooved to German popstar Nena's 99 Luftballoons, this video will make your day. Nena showcases her bardic chops with a retelling of Beowulf to the tune of her signature song.

Chefs inspired by the past

Historic cookery has advanced to a point that the Wall Street Journal is taking notice. In an article by Alina Dizik, historic recipes, dating back to Roman times, are re-interpreted by the chefs of major international restaurants.

13th century Spanish document surfaces at University of Virginia

15 years ago, George Greenia discovered a 13th century medieval Spanish document, missing for centuries, in the archives at the University of Virginia’s Alderman Library. Now the contents and story of discovery of the document have been disclosed.

English class looks at vagrancy laws in Tudor England

The Cornell College (Mount Vernon, Iowa) website, which publishes the writings by students in the class, Women Writers in the Age of Shakespeare, includes a short essay on vagrancy in Tudor England. The article, Vagrancy in Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century England, was written by Sara Byrnes.