Archive - Jan 2011

January 6th

Restorations due at Westminster Abbey before royal wedding

The announcement that the upcoming wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton comes as mana from heaven for officials responsible for the upkeep of Westminter Abbey, the site of the spring nuptials.

January 5th

Crusader "rest stop" found in Bulgaria

In the 12th century, crusaders were known to have stopped at the Byzantine city of Blismos along the old Roman road in modern Bulgaria. Now archaeologists believe they have found the city near the village of Zlatna Livada.

Latin lost language in Iowa

"We’ll come to Xavier if you teach us Latin." said the granddaughters of Justin Kramer, who is teaches the language at one of only two schools in the state of Iowa."

Artifacts prove Welsh city's importance in Roman society

This Christmas, locals and visitors to Aberystwyth, Wales will be treated to a display of 4th century Roman artifacts at the Ceredigion Museum. The pieces were most likely owned by a wealthy landowner.

January 4th

Da Vinci document discovered in French library

A "fragment of paper with brown scrawls" discovered recently in a public library in the French city of Nantes was not just trash. It was a coded document written by Leonardo da Vinci. (photo)

A Celtic Amazing Grace

Violinist Andre Rieu wows a stadium full of spectators with a beautiful Celtic rendition of the hymn Amazing Grace, complete with a band of pipers and a lone pennywhistle. The video is available on YouTube.

Modern economic analysis of the Domesday Book

In 1086, William the Conqueror undertook the daunting task of cataloging his estates and possesions in England. The results are known as the Domesday Book. Now author John McDonald is using modern economic analysis to evaluate the productivity of the Wiltshire estates.

January 3rd

Indonesian fishermen find medieval shipwreck

Fishermen in Indonesia have found a shipwreck that probably dates to the 14th century. The wooden ship contains green and gray ceramics similar to what Chinese merchants traded at the time.

Space science technology to be used in Renaissance restoration

Two important Tudor tombs will benefit from technology developed for space science research in a new project led by experts from the University of Leicester.

Medieval Gunpowder Research Group reports

The Medieval Gunpowder Research Group has posted a series of studies relating to use of gunpowder in the Middle Ages. The reports were produced by Middelaldercentret, Nykøbing Falster, Denmark.

January 2nd

Medieval alabaster comes to Florida

Sixty pieces of alabaster sculpture from the Victoria & Albert Museum are going on display at the Society of Four Arts in Palm Beach, Florida (USA). The pieces date to the 14th and 15th century, and many still have original paint.

Don Tariq ibn Jelal elevated to Laurel in Lochac

Giles de Roet reports that Their Majesties of the Kingdom of Lochac have chosen to elevate Don Tariq ibn Jelal to the Order of the Laurel for his years of research and application of period fencing.

Boston art museum returns missing 14th century embroidery to Italy

The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston has returned a 14th century silk and metal embroidery to the Diocesan Museum of Trent, Italy. The stunning embroidery, entitled "The Entombment of Saint Vigilius," was commissioned by George of Liechtenstein in 1390.

January 1st

Equestrian statues come to life in Rome

Michelanglo's statue of Marcus Aurelius, sculpted in the 1530s, features a horse with "a strong build, a broad chest, thick manes and tails, and robust legs," the same characteristics of modern Maremmano horses, believed to have descended from the emperors' mounts.

Holy Thorn of Glastonbury vandalized

Police in Glastonbury, England are looking for vandals who cut the branches from the Holy Thorn, a 2,000-year-old tree said to have been planted by Joseph of Arimathea. (video)