Archive

May 6th, 2016

Turning over a New Leaf: Change and Development in the Medieval Book

A European web site, oapen.org, in cooperation with Leiden University Press, is offering a free e-book on the history of book publishing in the Middle Ages.

April 1st

SCA anticipates upcoming "L-ebration"

Striving to be as period as possible, the SCA has renamed its upcoming anniversary event from "50 Year" to "L Year".

March 18th

Black Book of Carmarthen reveals its secrets

The National Library of Wales has ghosts - but not the scary kind. These ghosts are images, seen only by using ultraviolet lighting, in the 750-year-old Black Book of Carmarthen, "the first Welsh text to include medieval figures such as King Arthur and Merlin," and the images are doodles and poetry added throughout the ages. (photos)

March 16th

Kingdom of Outlands hails new Crown Prince and Princess

The Kingdom of Outlands salutes Kolgrimr Olafsson and Danielle, the new Crown Prince and Crown Princess, following the Spring 2016 Crown Tournament.

February 25th

NYPL makes digital public domain materials fully downloadable

The New York Public Library has made all of their digital public domain materials, including the Digital Scriptorum, downloadable in high resolution without jumping through any permissions hoops.

First printed edition of Shakespeare plays & exhibit coming to all 50 states in the US

To mark the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's death, The Folder Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C., is sending out a traveling exhibit with copies of the first printing ("First Folio") of Shakespeare's plays from 1623.

January 1st

Pennsic 45 registration is open

The Pennsic Registration Office is now accepting registrations for Pennsic 45, to be held July 29 through August 14.

The Dream We Dream Together: Bringing Pennsic Home

On the Vaguely Bohemian web site, Rambler writes about discovering Pennsic as a first camping trip, and the power of a shared dream brought to life.

December 15th, 2015

London medieval devotional: "a cautionary tale for ambitious politicians"

While excavating by the Thames River, a team of archaeologists from the Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA) recently discovered a rare, metal devotional, dating to the 14th century, depicting "the capture, trial and execution of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, political rebel turned martyr." (photos)

December 3rd

Goose bone flute found at Lincoln Castle

The construction of a new vault for the Magna Carta at Lincoln Castle led to the discovery of a unique goose bone flute dating to Norman times. While the flute was broken, a re-enactor muscian has created two replicas, one for display with the broken original and another to play. (photos)

December 1st

"Very significant" Pictish fort found off the coast of Scotland

A team of archaeologists from the University of Aberdeen are investigating a remote sea stack off the coast of Aberdeenshire, Scotland, to learn if it hosts the remains of a "very significant" Pictish fort. Excavations have so far uncovered what is believed to be "the remains of a house, a fireplace and ramparts."

November 28th

Scheduled Downtime for SCAtoday.net

SCAtoday.net will be offline for approximately two hours, beginning around 8:30 p.m. US Eastern (GMT-5:00) on Sunday, November 29. During the outage we will be making changes to the virtual server hardware. (Update: This work has been completed. Thank you for your patience.)

November 27th

Balds Leechbook may contain cure for antibiotic-resistant bugs

Dr Christina Lee of the University of Nottingham may have made an astonishing discovery: an effective treatment for "Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) which is one of the most antibiotic-resistant bugs costing modern health services billions." Dr. Lee, however, is not a scientist but an Anglo-Saxon expert from the School of English, who found the cure in a 10th century medical book. (videos)

November 21st

Alamire: composer, scribe, musician, spy?

Bavarian composer Petrus Alamire was a man of many talents including, possibly, a spy. Last year, his choral work, composed for Henry VIII, came in at number 2 on the classical music charts with an album by the choral group Alamire. (photos)

November 16th

Evidence of Viking metalworkers found in Canada

A team of archaeologists has discovered early Norse artifacts in Canada and its Arctic islands, including what it believes is a stone crucible, with traces of bronze inside, used for metalworking. (photo)

November 15th

"Groundbreaking" discovery may give insight into Fujiwara-kyo, Japan's first capital

Researchers from the Nara National Research Institute for Cultural Properties are studying a series of square holes they believe may have held the foundation for an important building in Fujiwara-kyo, the nation's capital between 694 and 710.

October 30th

Vivat to Ailitha de Ainwyk, Drachenwald's newest Laurel

I write to report the happy news that on Friday at Crown tourney their Majesties Thorvaldr and Timoe invited Lady Ailitha de Ainwyk to sit her vigil to consider joining the order of the Laurel, and asked for her reply at court the next day.

October 29th

Chivalry Isn't Dead, Just Misunderstood

An article on Myths Retold considers the question of what "chivalry" meant in the Middle Ages, metaphorically and linguistically, and how that relates to modern concepts of chivalry. [PG-13 due to language]

October 4th

Hyde Abbey Garden may halt search for bones of Alfred the Great

The Friends of Hyde Abbey Garden are not keen on the idea of archaeologists digging up the garden in search of the remains of King Alfred the Great. The garden was established in 2003 above the site in Winchester, England, believed to be the grave of the king.

September 30th

DNA study shows Viking families traveled together

A team of experts from the University of Oslo, led by Erika Hagelberg, has recently published its research in The Royal Society Philosophical Transactions B showing that "women played a significant role in Viking migrations." Their findings were made by comparing ancient Norse and Icelandic mitochondrial DNA with mitochondrial DNA of modern Northwestern Europeans.

September 26th

Northampton dig reveals chess workshop

Medieval chess pieces have been found in various digs throughout Great Britain, but for the first time, archaeologists have discovered a workshop where such game pieces were made. The discovery was made by a team from the Museum of London Archaeology at the Angel Street excavation in Northampton. (photos)

September 19th

English legal documents date the f-word to the 1300s

Paul Booth, an English historian at Keele University, has found the so-called f-word expletive used as an uncomplimentary nickname in several legal documents during the years 1310 and 1311. [NSFW]

Garden project yields Anglo-Saxon cross slab

“I cleaned it off and realised it was carved. It looked like some of the things you see round here in museums so I contacted a museum and the archaeologists got very excited," said John Wyatt about a moss-covered stone slab he purchased for a garden project. (photo)

September 18th

Geophysical survey maps Old Sarum

A geophysical survey carried out by students and archaeologists from the University of Southampton has mapped, for the first time, the layout of historic site of Old Sarum near Salisbury, England, from its origins in the Iron Age to its decline in the 13th century, concentrating heavily on the prosperous medieval town. (photo)

September 4th

The Middle Ages return to Malta

Each year in April, Medieval Mdina returns to Malta to offer a variety of entertainments, "from battles and skirmishes to sword fights, live music, falconry displays and historic re-enactments." A number of groups participate, as detailed in a feature story from The Times of Malta. (photos)

September 3rd

16th century German jetton found in Jamestown cellar

For over 20 years, archaeologists from Preservation Virginia have been working to find out how settlers lived and worked around the 1607 fort at Jamestown, Virginia. Recently, the team has concentrated on a pit or cellar built adjacent to the wall of the fort. (photos)

September 1st

Irish reliquary becomes Viking jewelry box

"Ranvaick a kistu thasa" or in English, "Ranvaik (a female name) owns this casket" reads a runic inscription on the base of a jeweled, Irish reliquary on display in the Danish National Museum. While the casket dates to the 8th century, the inscription was added two centuries later, demonstrating one small effect of Viking raids. (photo)

August 29th

Hospital resources used to examine 6th century artifacts

In 2012, archaeologists discovered the remains of 27 Anglo-Saxon warriors and their grave goods at Barrow Clump in Salisbury, England. Recently experts used an army field hospital x-ray machine to examine a 6th century sword found at the site. (photos)

August 27th

Roman treasure found in the Hague

Archaeologists working on the site of road construction in the Hague, Netherlands were surprised to discover a treasure hoard in a Roman pot. The extent of the treasure was revealed recently at the annual De Reuvensdagen archaeological conference. (photo)

August 25th

Pennsic Cryptogram Solved

The first of a set of cryptograms from Pennsic has been solved. Lord Orlando dei Medici (East) successfully deciphered one of the puzzles to reveal a quote from Cynthia's Revels by the Elizabethan playwright Ben Jonson.