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Learning from the teeth of the dead

SCAtoday.net - Wed, 2014-06-11 17:13

"It's fantastic we can look in such detail at an individual who died 600 years ago," said Don Walker, an osteologist with the Museum of London about his recent work on remains found last year under London's Charterhouse Square. A study of the teeth has revealed that at least 12 of the skeletons died in the 14th century of the Black Death. (photos)

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Categories: SCA news sites

SCA Artisans Get Recognition With the SCA Artisan Love Project

SCAtoday.net - Wed, 2014-06-11 12:16

The Middle Kingdom's A&S Pentathlon Champion is shining the light on the amazing artisans of the Society with the SCA Artisan Love project, which showcases those artisans who inspire us with their beautiful artifacts, period processes, hard-sought research, infectious enthusiasm, and just plain amazing work.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Register of St. Osmund misplaced for 34 years

History Blog - Tue, 2014-06-10 23:42

The Register of St. Osmund, a 12th century manuscript recording the foundational documents of Salisbury Cathedral, has been returned to the Cathedral after 34 years. It was a filing mishap that saw one of the Cathedral’s most important historical records leave its home to spend almost four decades in the County Record Office. The book belongs to the Cathedral Chapter under the purview of the Dean of Salisbury, but somehow wound up in the archives of the Diocese, under the purview of the Bishop, instead.

In 1978 the General Synod of the Church of England passed the Parochial Registers and Records Measure which stipulated that non-current parish records should be transferred to the records offices of local authorities where they could be properly cared for by experts. The measure protected the records, ensuring they would be kept in proper archival conditions and handled by professionals rather than church employees who may or may not have any special knowledge in this area, and made church documents accessible to the public for historical and genealogical research.

In keeping with the Parochial Registers and Records Measure, in 1980 the Diocesan archives were moved from Wren Hall in the Cathedral Close offsite to the County Record Office, now the Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre. The misfiled Register of St. Osmund went with them, nestled amidst the parish’s collection of baptismal records and historical wills from 1540 to 1858.

It was archivists at the Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre who finally recognized that the Register belonged in the Cathedral Library and Archives.

The Bishop of Salisbury, the Rt Revd Nicholas Holtam, said “I am delighted to see this ancient document, which somehow got confused with my predecessors’ records, returned to the cathedral. One of the glories of Salisbury Cathedral is the integrity and continuity of its ancient records and it reflects great credit on Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre that they recognized this particular document’s true home and encouraged its return.”

The Register of St. Osmund was not, as its name implies, compiled by the Saint himself. It’s named after him because it’s a compendium of charters, rules, statutes and rites that he instituted when he was Bishop of Salisbury from 1078 until his death in 1099. Salisbury was called Sarum in his day, and the Sarum Use, the practices regulating the Divine Office, mass and liturgical calendar that Osmund put together from pre-existing Norman and Saxon sources, became hugely influential. It was in widespread use in churches all over the country. Even after the Reformation, the Sarum Use was with some modifications employed in Church of England practices and in fact still is to this day.

The original manuscript drawn up by Osmund (he was a dedicated bibliophile and did a great deal of copying and book binding personally, so he could have literally put the first register together himself, or he could have ordered it put together by scribes) was lost. The Register includes the earliest surviving copy of Osmund’s Consuetudinary (a book containing the forms and ceremonies of a particular church or monastery), written around 1222-1240 for use in the new Salisbury Cathedral built on the property of Richard Poore when he was Bishop of Salisbury.

The influence of the Sarum Rite inspired a movement to canonize Osmund as a saint and father of the English church. The first papal bull establishing a preliminary inquiry into Osmund’s potential sainthood was promulgated on May 30th, 1228, by Pope Gregory IX. The inquiry took another 250 years, the repeated interventions of at least two kings of England (Henry V and Henry VI), and the Salisbury chapter to come to fruition. Osmund was canonized on January 1st, 1457.

Given the major historical import, therefore, of the Register, it’s kind of crazy that they ever lost track of it. Let’s just be grateful it wandered into the county archives for all those years and that it’s back in the Cathedral library now.

 

Categories: Arts and Sciences, History

Slave trade in Eastern Europe chronicled

SCAtoday.net - Tue, 2014-06-10 18:54

In a 2014 journal article for Russian History, The Baltic Finnic People in the Medieval and Pre-Modern Eastern European Slave Trade, author Jukka Korpela looks at the routes of the slave trade in Eastern Europe. Jukka is affiliated with the Department of Geographical and Historical Studies, University of Eastern Finland.

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Categories: SCA news sites

From the Silent Heraldry Deputy

East Kingdom Gazette - Tue, 2014-06-10 15:51
Unto All Silent Heralds, Students of Silent Heraldry, and Other Interested Parties of the Known World,
Greetings from Nesscia, Silent Heraldry Deputy to the SCA Laurel Sovereign of Arms.
As the summer progresses and events happen, we have the opportunity to come together around the Known World in small groups to share ideas and talk about what what is happening now and what we would like to see happen with the future.

I would like to know what your thoughts are. Whether individual thoughts, or meeting notes, please do send them to me at silentherald<at>heraldry<dot>sca<dot>org

By being involved and sending me your notes, ideas and thoughts, we can all work together to shape policy and influence silent heraldry for years to come.

Ever in service,
Nesscia
Filed under: Corporate, Court, Heraldry, Official Notices Tagged: court heraldry, heraldry, Laurel Sovereign of Arms, silent heraldry, Silent Heralds, voice heraldry

Panteria equestrian photos online

SCAtoday.net - Tue, 2014-06-10 10:43

Brita reports that she has created an album of photos from Panteria 2014 which took place recently in the Kingdom of the East. The photos are available to view on Shutterfly.

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Categories: SCA news sites

For Honor, Glory and Laughs

East Kingdom Gazette - Tue, 2014-06-10 10:40

The Kountess of Kaos at the first LvP is now entered as the Duchess of Discord.

Seven Laurels, seven pelicans and many silly weapons are ready to take the field but they need your help.  The list of peers taking part in the annual Laurels vs. Pelicans boffer challenge is up on the website.  These peers face off with boffer weapons to raise money for the Pennsic war chest, which funds Pennsic costs such as the hospitality tent and royalty dinner.  The peers and their current totals are listed below.

 

Laurels Pelicans Mistress Elizabeth Eleanore Lovell
The Bee Keeper
Weapon: Catherine Wheel buckler with bloody tips and a flail of bumble bees
Music: Donor’s Choice! $0.00 Mistress Mercedes de Calafia
La Matadora (The Bull Fighter)
Weapon: Seneschal’s Key of Entirely Appropriate Conduct
Music: Bizet’s Toreador Song $25.00 Mesterno Tyzes “Zsof” Sofia
The Magyar Mangler of the Midrealm
Weapon: The Cameron
Music: TBD $35.00 Mistress Alys Mackyntoich
Her Infernal Splendor, Mistress Alys Mackyntoich, Ogress Herald,
Demonon Queen of Fence, Word-wielder, Destroyer of Knees, Crusher of the
Hopes and Dreams of the Weak, Hammer of the Insipid
Weapon: Two Sword
Music: Theme from Jaws $85.00 Mistress Aife ingen Chonchobair
The Battling Banfili
Weapon: Ogham covered Standing Stone
Music: O Fortuna $10.00 Sir Tanaka Raiko
Dieter Langenstaffen
Weapon: The Giant Staff of Floppiness
Music: We are the Champions $0.00 Master Alaric MacConnal
Master of Ominous Music
Weapon: B-flat
Music: TBD – PAID! $100.00 Baronne Maîtresse Jehannine de Flandres
Keg Killer
Weapon: Beer bottle with keg shield
Music: Donor’s Choice $25.00 Master Dietrich Schwelgengräber
Music: Donor’s choice $0.00 Kazumi no Tanaka aka Baroness Mistress Sofia Staritskiia Rhosia
Mrs. Tanaka
Weapon: Flying Octopus $0.00 Master Grim the Skald
Grim the Scalding
Weapon: Giant Ladle
Music: TBD $0.00 Duchess Kiena Stewart
Duchess of Discord
Weapon: Lance and Hobby Horse
Music: Imperial March from Star Wars $0.00 Mistress Eleanore MacCarthaigh
Weapon: Frying Pan and Spatula $0.00 Mistress Katherine Barr
Music: Donor’s Choice $0.00

Grim the Skalding with his giant ladle at the first LvP

What weapons the peers use depends on how much money they raise.  Raise $25?  They head out with just a dagger.  Raise $100?  They could head out with a flying octopus or a frying pan and spatula.  See www.laurelsvspelicans.com for information on how to donate and the weapons levels.

In addition to the weapons, the peers can have theme music played for their moment of glory.  Baroness Sabine de Kerbriant will play entrance music for a peer on her rauschpfeife for a $20 donation.  Some peers have listed musical choices.  Others are leaving it up to the donor who gives $20 to the Pennsic war chest to make their intro happen.


Filed under: Events Tagged: Laurels vs. Pelicans

Mausoleum of Romulus reopens after 20 years

History Blog - Mon, 2014-06-09 23:26

The Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, son of the Roman Emperor Maxentius, reopened to the public Monday after 20 years of restoration. The large circular structure was built by Maxentius in the early 4th century, probably as a family tomb, on the Appian Way. When his young son died around 309 A.D. — he is said to have drowned in the Tiber — he was buried in the mausoleum.

The tomb was part of a large imperial complex that included Maxentius’ palace and a circus for chariot racing. Little of the palace is still standing, while the mausoleum has lost its second level but is still an impressive structure, inside and out. It is surrounded by a quadroporticus on the outside with its main entrance on the Via Appia and two smaller entrances facing the palace and the circus. On the mausoleum itself, the main entrance facing the Appia was walled up centuries ago. It has now been reopened in the recent restoration. Inside, the crypt has a large central pillar with a circular corridor onto which open niches where the sarcophagi of the royal family would have been deposited. A spacious vestibule connected to the corridor probably once led to the second floor.

There’s an 18th century brick home attached to the back of the mausoleum that was originally a farmhouse for use when the property was dedicated to agricultural purposes. It was later converted into a home for personal use by the princely Torlonia family, who owned the land before it was requisitioned by the Fascist government in 1943.

The circus, while in ruins, is the best preserved of its kind, with pieces of all its major architectural components extant. Two of its gate towers have survived, as have the remains of the starting gates, the spina (the central median around which the chariots turned), and a triumphal arch. It’s also the second largest circus after the Circus Maximus at 500 meters (1640 feet) long and 90 meters (295 feet) wide. There was room in the stands for as many as 10,000 spectators to watch the races.

Parts of the circus were excavated by archaeologist Antonio Nibby in 1825, who unearthed a marble inscription dedicating the inaugural games to the deified Valerius Romulus, clarissimus puer (most highly regarded boy), nobilissimus vir (most noble man), twice consul of Rome, son of Maxentius the undefeated Augustus, grandson of the divine Maximian. Before that discovery, the circus was thought to have been Caracalla’s doing.

Maxentius would have been very put out to find his construction project attributed to another emperor. The Appia complex was part of a major effort on his part to legitimize his usurpation of the throne through the revival of great building in the city of Rome. In the years before the Praetorian Guard made Maxentius, formerly a Caesar or junior emperor, Augustus, emperors like Diocletian, Maximian and Galerius had focused imperial construction on other cities: Nicomedia for Diocletian, Milan for Maximian, Salonica for Galerius. They brought the imperial court and administration to these cities, diminishing Rome’s political and architectural importance.

With that in mind, Maxentius moved to build anew in Rome. The Appian Way complex was intended to be a new administrative center, not just a compound for private fun. The choice to place it on the Appia, outside of the formal boundary of the city of Rome where the tombs of the wealthy had for centuries dotted the roadside, was a break with tradition. He may have decided to build out there because he wanted his dynastic tomb to be part of the complex, and according to Roman custom, all bodies had to be buried outside the city.

You can take a look around the complex via satellite on Google Maps. To the right of the red marker are the circus ruins. Slightly up and to the left is the mausoleum.


View Larger Map

 

Categories: Arts and Sciences, History

New Chronicler needed for "Quivers and Quarrels"

SCAtoday.net - Mon, 2014-06-09 16:54

Quivers and Quarrels, the SCA archery E-newsletter, is looking for a new Chronicler/editor. The current Chronicler will be leaving due to mundane job requirements.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Photos and videos from Northshield 2014 Spring Coronation

SCAtoday.net - Mon, 2014-06-09 13:34

Viscountess Elashava bas Riva reports that she has created an album of photos and several videos from the recent Spring 2014 Coronation in the Kingdom of Northshield. The photos are available on Flickr, and the videos are on YouTube.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Fort Wayne "weekend warrior" leads Shire of the Shadowed Stars

SCAtoday.net - Mon, 2014-06-09 08:18

Wendy Martin-Glick, known in the SCA as Lady Maggie MacKeith, discovered the Society in 1987 and has been hooked ever since. The Seneschale of the Shire of the Shadowed Stars in Fort Wayne, Indiana recently spoke with Lynn Altevogt of the Journal Gazette.

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Categories: SCA news sites

1733 portrait of freed slave acquired by Yorktown museum

History Blog - Sun, 2014-06-08 23:25

A previously unknown portrait of Ayuba Suleiman Diallo (1701–1773), an aristocrat from what is today Senegal who was sold into slavery in 1730 but made his way back home through a series of fortunate events, has been acquired by Virginia’s Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation. Along with its companion piece by the same artist, this is the earliest known portrait of a slave from the 13 colonies and the first Western portrait of a named African sitter. Its ultimate destination is the future American Revolution Museum at Yorktown which is slated to open in 2016, but it will be on display at the Yorktown Victory Center from June 14th through August 3rd.

Ayube Diallo, also known as Job ben Solomon in England, was the scion of a wealthy family of Muslim clerics and rulers in the West African Kingdom of Futa. While on a mission to the Gambia River to barter two slaves in exchange for supplies, Diallo was kidnapped and sold into slavery himself. He told the British slavers who bought him from his Mandingo kidnappers that his family would ransom him, but when the message didn’t get to his family in time, William and Henry Hunt loaded him into the ship and sold him to a dealer in Annapolis, Maryland.

He wound up the property of one Mr. Tolsey, a tobacco farmer on Kent Island, Maryland, who first attempted to put Diallo to work in the fields. He couldn’t hack it. This was back-breaking labor, and Diallo was a soft scholar. He was assigned to tending cattle instead, which he was a little better at. After being mocked by children for his prayers, in June of 1731 Diallo ran away. He was soon captured and put in prison in the Kent County Courthouse. There he met a British lawyer named Thomas Bluett whose curiosity was piqued by Diallo’s fine carriage and composure.

Bluett enlisted a translator and found out Diallo came from a wealthy family of important people. Tolsey, keen to derive some kind of profit from this liability of a slave, allowed Diallo to write a letter back home and then gladly allowed an official from the Royal African Company in London to buy his freedom. Diallo and Bluett sailed to London in March of 1733 where the cleric, nobleman and former slave made a social splash. He was commissioned by the future founder of the British Museum, Sir Hans Sloane, to translate Arabic manuscripts in his library. He was introduced at Court by the Duke of Montagu. And he had his portrait painted by William Hoare.

Bluett describes the painting of the portrait in Some Memoirs of the Life of Job, one of the earliest slave narratives (albeit not written in first person):

JOB’s Aversion to Pictures of all Sorts, was exceeding great; insomuch, that it was with great Difficulty that he could be brought to sit for his own. We assured him that we never worshipped any Picture, and that we wanted his for no other End but to keep us in mind of him. He at last consented to have it drawn; which was done by Mr. Hoare. When the Face was finished, Mr. Hoare ask’d what Dress would be most proper to draw him in; and, upon JOB’s desiring to be drawn in his own Country Dress, told him he could not draw it, unless he had seen it, or had it described to him by one who had: Upon which JOB answered, If you can’t draw a Dress you never saw, why do some of you Painters presume to draw God, whom no one ever saw?

Hoare figured it out in the end, painting Diallo in a white robe and turban, wearing verses from the Qur’an in a pouch around his neck. The use of national dress makes this portrait unique. Other prominent named Africans would be painted after Diallo, but they were depicted wearing English dress and wigs.

Hoare painted two versions of this portrait, although for centuries only one was known and it was long thought lost. The only evidence of it was a 1750 print. It turns out to have been in the same family since 1840 and was rediscovered in December 2009 when the owners put it up for auction at Christie’s in London. The Qatar Museums Authority purchased it for £554,937.50 ($932,517). The Culture Minister put a temporary export block on the painting to give the National Portrait Gallery a chance to raise the money by the end of August 2010. They came within £60,000 of the goal on August 12th, 2010. I was unable to discover if they actually managed to raise the full amount on time, but either way, the NPG made the QMA a purchase offer which it refused. The QMA did withdraw its export application, however, and eventually negotiated a long-term loan with the National Portrait Gallery.

The publicity from the NPG’s fundraising campaign brought attention to the portrait, inspiring the owners of the second version to engage in private sale negotiations with the Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation.

The Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation, Inc., purchased the oil-on-canvas painting with funds raised privately, including a lead gift from Foundation trustee Fred D. Thompson, Jr., of Thompson Hospitality, the country’s largest minority-owned food service company. “This portrait is a powerful symbol of the diversity of colonial America’s population, which included people from many different African cultures,” says Thompson. “Diallo – his image and story – is an ideal teaching opportunity for the American Revolution Museum at Yorktown galleries.”

“For approximately three years now, the Foundation has been in confidential negotiations to acquire this important portrait,” says Thomas E. Davidson, Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation senior curator. “Diallo’s visage speaks for the hundreds of thousands of enslaved Africans and African Americans who remain largely unknown, yet who constituted a major part of late-colonial America’s population.”

 

Categories: Arts and Sciences, History

45,000 English surnames now in database

SCAtoday.net - Sun, 2014-06-08 16:04

The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) funded Family Names of the United Kingdom Project has completed its first phase with 45,000 surnames, from the 11th to 19th centuries, researched and explained.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Steppes Warlord 2014 photos online

SCAtoday.net - Sun, 2014-06-08 11:55

Caelin on Andrede reports that he has created an album of photos from Steppes Warlord 2014 which took place recently in the Kingdom of Ansteorra. The photos are available to view on Flickr.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Swedish city returns ancient textiles to Peru

History Blog - Sat, 2014-06-07 23:56

After years of negotiations, the City of Gothenburg in southwestern Sweden has agreed to return its collection of 89 textiles from the Paracas peninsula to Peru. The 2,000-year-old textiles are in extremely fragile condition, so they will be repatriated in phases. The first four pieces arrive in Peru next week and will be unveiled on June 18th. The rest will be transported over the course of seven years until the whole collection is returned by 2021.

These extraordinary embroidered textiles first came to archaeologists’ attention in the early 20th century when they began to appear in private collections. Their intensity of color, size, design and composition were unique, unlike any textiles from known Peruvian cultures. Realizing that the textiles had to have been looted from an unknown site, Peruvian archaeologist Julio C. Tello hired professional looter Juan Quintana to guide him to the find spot in 1925. He led Tello to Paracas, a desert peninsula on the southern coast of Peru, where Tello’s team excavated the remains of a civilization that flourished from around 700 B.C. to the second century A.D. when it became assimilated into the Nazca culture.

The people of the Paracas culture were able fishermen, farmers and craftspeople. They made obsidian tools, ceramics, hammered gold jewelry, basketry and most gloriously of all, complex and beautiful textiles. Made from the wool of camelids (llamas, alpacas and vicuñas) and cotton, the textiles were colored in more than 200 different bright shades using natural dyes. Every fabric was embroidered by hand with cactus thorn needles, and when you consider that textiles have been found that are 34 meters (112 feet) long, you can imagine what an incredibly labor-intensive process it was. Archaeologists believe it took years to produce a single such masterpiece.

Creating such intricate and large textiles was a collaborative effort, the work of many people working at once. The textiles had important religious significance and indicated a person’s status in the community. The most exceptional examples were discovered by Tello on October 1st, 1927, when he encountered a vast funerary complex he named the Wari Kayan necropolis. There 429 people were found buried wrapped in layer after layer of textiles. The dead were adorned in their most prized possessions — jewelry, clothes, headbands — and seated in fetal position in a basket. Grave goods, food and sacrificial objects were added, and then the entire basket was wrapped in layers of fine embroidered textiles with a rough cotton cloth on the outermost layer. That’s why the large textiles were needed, because by the time they got to the outer layers, the bundles got big, as much as five feet high and seven feet wide.

When Tello unearthed these marvels, they had been kept in pristine condition by the arid desert climate and the lack of oxygen and light in the underground burials. As soon as they were excavated, the textiles started to degrade. All the Paracas finds were sent to museums in Lima for study and conservation. In 1930, the dictatorship of Augusto B. Leguía was overthrown in a military coup led by Lieutenant Colonel Luis Miguel Sánchez Cerro. The subsequent social and political upheaval and war with Colombia left the Paracas textiles vulnerable to depredation. Looting and smuggling increased dramatically.

It was during this chaos that 89 Paracas textiles found their way to Sweden. They were smuggled out of Peru in the early 1930s by Sven Karell, then the Swedish Consul General in Peru, who acquired them on the black market and shipped them back home into the appreciative arms of the Ethnographic Department of Gothenburg Museum. They went on display in November of 1932, but they were exposed to UV light, varying levels of heat and moisture, and repeated handling, all of which contributed to their decay.

In 1939 the museum was renovated. To prepare for their new exhibition, the Paracas textiles were sewn onto linen or dyed cotton and framed in glass. In 1963 the textiles were mounted vertically onto panels that could be pulled out. This turned out to be a disaster, as the vibrations from the pulling out damaged the increasingly delicate pieces. Finally in 1970 the textiles were taken out of public view. The museum moved to a new building in 1992, by which time the textiles had been installed in custom-built display cases. Then the Paracas collection moved again in 2001, this time to the Museum of World Culture. Because the fibers were in such poor condition, the textiles were moved on air suspended truck.

They remained out of view until 2008, when after careful analysis the textiles which were found to be able to withstand movement were put on display. They were laid out horizontally and transported the short distance from the archives to the Museum of World Culture in vibration-free cases. A crane lifted them into the gallery through a window. The exhibition ran for three years. When the textiles returned to the museum archives, there was more fiber damage even with nothing but the utmost of caution employed in their transportation and display.

It was that 2008 exhibition that spurred the repatriation talks. Not only did the museum not deny that the textiles had been smuggled by the Consul General, the exhibition was entitled A Stolen World and detailed the whole saga without flinching. It’s quite remarkable, really. I’ve never seen a museum so directly confront its complicity in the traffic in looted antiquities. Peruse the museum’s dedicated Paracas website to see how they handle the issue and to view some exquisite photographs of the collection.

In December of 2009, Peru contacted the Swedish Ministry of Foreign Affairs formally requesting the return of the purloined Paracas textiles. Since the museum had just opened an exhibition whose catalog included copies of the letters between Karell and the Gothenburg Museum officials overtly plotting the receipt of stolen goods, there was none of the usual nonsense about “good faith” and “anonymous Swiss collections.” Peru’s legal right was undisputed. The main question was whether the textiles could stand transportation across the globe when they could barely stand to be transported a mile or so from storage to the display galleries.

Now those issues have been dealt with as responsibly as possible, and the first four Paracas textiles are on their way home. One of them is a particularly exceptional example, a cloak about 104 by 53 centimeters made of squares with 32 different figures of animals, humans, plants and tools. Paracas textiles usually employ single motifs repeated over and over, so this tiled design is unique. Archaeologists believe it represents the movement of time, like a gorgeously embroidered Advent calendar. According to the felicitously named Luis Jaime Castillo Butters, Peru’s Vice Minister of Cultural Patrimony, the Paracas calendar textile is “the most important textile from Peru and one of the most important in the world.”

 

Categories: Arts and Sciences, History

Peers created at 2014 Rowany Festival

SCAtoday.net - Sat, 2014-06-07 20:38

At Their recent Rowany Festival XXXII, Their Majesties of the Kingdom of Lochac, Alfar and Angharat, offered elevation to the Peerage to four of Their subjects.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Paul of Bellatrix - Pennsic 2014 Classes

SCAtoday.net - Sat, 2014-06-07 16:16

Sign-ups are now open for Duke Paul's individual or small group instruction sessions at Pennsic 2014.  opics of instruction are the choice of the student.

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Categories: SCA news sites

King’s and Queen’s Archery Champions Unofficial Court Report

East Kingdom Gazette - Sat, 2014-06-07 08:05

It was a mostly beautiful day upon which Their Imperial Majesties, Brennan Augustus and Caoilfhionn Augusta, visited their Barony of Bergental on 31 May 2014, AS XLIX for the competition to choose their Champions of Archery.

There was some fine shooting, nearly eighty archers took the field, including Their Majesties and Their Highnesses. In the end, sixteen stood to compete for the victory, and to be named Queen’s Champion.

The finals came down to Rupert the Unbalanced, and Urho of the Pines. Following a dramatic shoot-off, Rupert emerged the victor, and would be named Queen’s Archery Champion for the 5th time.

At the beginning of court Krakken Gnashbone relinquished his place to Rupert, who was presented the regalia of the Queen’s Archery Champion, and a scroll by Charis Accipiter.

Colin Ursell was thanked for his service, and relieved of his duties as King’s Archery Champion. His Majesty chose Peter the Red, who had displayed incredible prowess to reach the semi-finals, to serve as His champion. Peter received the regalia of the King’s Archery Champion, and a scroll by Charis Accipiter.

The skies began to open, and though a light rain started to come down, court continued onwards.

Godric of Hampton was called into court. There, he presented to Alexander von Heisler the medallion of a Master Bowman. Alexander has achieved a royal-round average greater than 80 points to earn that honor.

Jehannine de Flandres was called to attend the court. She had in her possession old IKAC (Inter-Kingdom Archery Competition) medallions from many years ago. Since all of the recipients were present, she passed them the earned awards for this.

Next was Duchess Avelina called before the court. There, she presented to a recipient of Her Queen’s honor of distinction, Alberic, a token for his work with the state dinner.

The rains abated, much to the delight of those in attendance.

Their Majesties invited before them Mirabet de Gumy. She was named a Lady of the Court, and presented an AoA scroll with calligraphy and illumination by Wulfgar Silverbraid, words by Theodora Bryennissa called Treannah.

Her Majesty addressed Her Highness, and invited her into court. She offered her a stuffed blue tyger, as congratulations on her becoming Princess of the East. However, this was a pretense to get Þóra Eiríksdóttir into court, so that the companions of Order of the Silver Crescent may be called forth. She was inducted into said order, presented a medallion as well as a scroll by Nest verch Tangwistel.

Her Majesty next invited the children who had participated in Her service initiative into court. They were presented with beads and cheered. Then were the rest of the children present called before the court, as was Her guard Llewellyn Walsh. Llewelyn took the toy box, and ran into the field, where he served as human piñata for the children to get toys from.

Duke Kenric æt Essex was called before the court. His Majesty did expound upon the many, many, many things Kenric does, and lamented that he leaves nothing for anyone else to do! However, such was his work that it did not go unrecognized, and this day was his rapier prowess in particular noted. The recipients of the Order of the Silver Rapier were called forth. Kenric was inducted to the order, and received a medallion and a scroll by Elisenda de Luna.

Their Majesties called before their court Elisabeth Playledere. She was named a Lady of the Court, and presented with an AoA scroll with calligraphy by þóra Eiríksdóttir, and illumination by Emma Makilmone.

His Majesty addressed Her Excellency Bergantal. He could not help by admire the fine illumination work on the scroll just presented. He invited Emma Makilmone before the court. Noting her contributions to the Arts and Sciences, the companions of the Order of the Maunche were called forth. Emma Makilmone was inducted into the order, and received a medallion, as well as a scroll by Eloise of Coulter.

It was the conclusion of a fine day, and thus closed the court of Their Imperial Majesties, Brennan Augustus and Caoilfhionn Augusta was closed. Long may they reign over the Empire of the East!

In service,
Malcolm Bowman
Eastern Crown Herald
PS – Thank you for Heraldic assistance to Ryan MacWhyte and Simona bat Leone. Additional thank you to Alys Mackyntoich and Eva Woderose.


Filed under: Court Tagged: archery, champions, court report

5,000,000!

History Blog - Fri, 2014-06-06 23:44

Just a short note today to announce that when I wasn’t looking, The History Blog passed 5,000,000 total pageviews since I installed the counter in September 2009. I posted about crossing the threshold of the first million in September of 2011, so stat-wise we’re moving along at a vigorous pace despite certain setbacks. This time I missed the moment the odometer flipped by more than 100,000, but I figured it’s still worth taking a moment to plant the 5 million flag.

Thank you all so much for your eyeballs and your comments and your hot tips and your kind words and for sharing my nerdy enthusiasms.

Categories: Arts and Sciences, History

"Quivers and Quarrels" needs articles

SCAtoday.net - Fri, 2014-06-06 14:58

Sir Jon FitzRauf, co-editor of Quivers and Quarrels, reports that material is needed for the summer edition of the SCA wide archery E-newsletter.

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Categories: SCA news sites