Feed aggregator

Want an A&S Challenge?

East Kingdom Gazette - Thu, 2015-04-02 17:48

Feast Preparation, By Mistress Rhonwen glyn Conwy

A finalized list of A&S challenges for Artisans’ Village (June 5-7) is available.  We have 18 wonderful challenges representing a diverse array of arts, including cooking, scribal, costuming, glass bead/jewelry making, and the performing arts. We also have several research and persona based challenges, some of which would be applicable for a wide variety of arts or sciences.

Please view the list of challenges below, and go to the even website for more information about each challenge http://www.hartshorn-dale.org/village/challenges.htm

We hope to see you and your work at the event!

Submitted by Lissa Underhill

LIST OF CHALLENGES

Galen, What Should I Make for Dinner?
–Tristan de Worrell

Faith-Filled Food
–Judith bas Rabbi Mendel

Create a 16th Century Italian Item of Clothing or Accessory
–Kataryn Mercer

The Gift of Tongues
–Galefridus Peregrinus
–Judith bas Rabbi Mendel

An Untraveled Path Challenge
–Renye Wurm

Siens Experimente
–Alesone Gray of Cranlegh

Mistery of Grocers of our City of London
–Alesone Gray of Cranlegh

All In A Days Work
–Ibrahim al-Rashid

Write a Biography
–Markesa Manuel de Carvalhal

Procrastinators Challenge
–Sarah le Payller

Wire-wrapped bead challenge, in two parts.
–Sarah le Payller

Funny, It Does Look Jewish
–Reb Eleazar ha-Levi

Make Earrings
— Carowyn Silveroak

Kingdom Inspired Largesse
–Rainillt de Bello Marisco

Recreate a Period Glass Bead
–Elysabeth (Lissa) Underhill

Thinking Inside the Box: Formal Poetic Forms
–Aildreda de Tamwurthe on behalf of the East Kingdom College of Performers

“Tik, tak! hic, hac!”: Art about Artisans
–Sabine de Kerbriant

Getting your nibs wet
–Lada Monguligin


Filed under: Arts and Sciences Tagged: Hartshorn-dale

Validating the Principessa

SCAtoday.net - Thu, 2015-04-02 14:29

Art historians around the world are never quick to validate a "lost" work by one of the great masters. Thus is the case of La Bella Principessa, a small, "pen-and-ink portrait of a Florentine woman with a Mona Lisa-esque smile," believed to have been created by Leonardo da Vinci. (photo)

read more

Categories: SCA news sites

The frightening illuminations of the Getty

SCAtoday.net - Thu, 2015-04-02 10:18

For Halloween 2014, Bryan C. Keene of the J. Paul Getty Museum blog Iris, chose to look at some of the frightening images of medieval, illuminated manuscripts in the museum's collection. The article is richly illustrated with examples. (photos)

read more

Categories: SCA news sites

Court Report: Festival of the Passing of the Ice Dragon, March 21, A.S. XLIX, Barony of the Rhydderich Hael

AEthelmearc Gazette - Thu, 2015-04-02 09:45

Documented from the Scrolls of the Reign of Titus and Anna Leigh, King and Queen of Æthelmearc: the Business of Their Court at the Festival of the Passing of the Ice Dragon in the Barony of Rhydderich Hael 21 March AS 49, accompanied by Their Highnesses Timothy and Gabrielle, Prince and Princess of  Æthelmearc, Their Excellencies Carolus and Isolda, Baron and Baroness of Rhydderich Hael, and His Highness Steinnar, Prince of Ealdormere. As recorded by Their Silver Buccle Herald, Kameshima-kyō Zentarō Umakai, with the assistance of Master Fridrikr Tomasson av Knusslig Hamn, Gullskel Herald, THL Sophie Davenport, Seedling Pursuivant, and Drotinn Jorundr hinn Rotinn, Golden Alce Herald.

In the morning:

Brehress Gwendolyn the Graceful singing for Delftwood. Photo by Lord Simon Peregrine.

Brehress Gwendolyn the Graceful was brought forward to explain the loss of the regalia of the Sylvan Bard that was entrusted to her care. Said regalia was in the possession of Their Excellencies Fergus and Helene of Delftwood, who offered to return it in exchange for a song in praise of their Barony. Brehress Gwendolyn then sang her new song, “Sails,” written for exactly such a purpose. Pleased with Her Excellency’s song, Their Excellencies returned the Sylvan Bard regalia to its rightful owner.

Lord Horatius Cincinnatus was inducted into the Order of the Keystone for his service to the Barony of the Rhydderich Hael, including serving as its Knight Marshal. Scroll illuminated by Baroness Juliana Rosalia Dolce di Siena and calligraphed by Tiarna Padraig Ó Branduibh.

Lord Horatius Cincinnatus. Photo by Lord Simon.

Lady Katerin Starke was created a Companion of the Golden Alce for her skills on multiple fields of combat, including heavy rattan, fencing, and archery, as well as her service as marshal. Scroll illuminated by Lady Gillian MacGill of Verona and Lady Fenris McGill Feu Bleddyn and calligraphed by Lady Juliana Stafford.

Lady Katerin Starke. Photo by Lord Simon.

Lord Bovi Davidsson was elevated to the Order of the Keystone for his toil in multiple kitchens, including creating the offerings for the day’s event. Scroll illuminated by Sir Sextus Plinius Callidus and calligraphed by Tiarna Padraig Ó Branduibh.

Lord Bovi Davidson. Photo by Mistress Hilderun Hugelmann.

Mistress Ysabeau Tiercelin. Photo by Mistress Arianna of Wynthrope.

Mistress Ysabeau Tiercelin and Shishido-nagon Tora Gozen approached Their Majesties to complete a bit of overdue business: the presentation of Shishido’s completed hitatare from her elevation to the Order of the Pelican. However, when the hitatare was revealed to Their Majesties and the populace, it had also been embroidered with a wreath of laurel leaves. The Order of the Laurel was brought forth, and Shishido-nagon was ordered to accompany them to the vigil that had been prepared for (and, unknowingly, mostly by) her, that she might contemplate elevation to that Order and answer Their Majesties that evening.

In the evening:

His Highness Steinnar thanked Their Majesties, Their Highnesses, Their Excellencies and the populace for the hospitality He had received that day. He presented gifts to all assembled, and announced that, when summer had come to Æthelmearc and the East and Middle joined forces to invade the Sylvan Lands, He would lead Ealdormere’s forces in league with Æthelmearc.

Baron Caleb Reynolds. Photo by Arianna.

Baroness Ekaterina Volkova announced that Baron Caleb Reynolds had won the day’s Scroll Blank competition, having contributed more than 40 scroll blanks to the Signet’s office. However, Ishiyama-roku-i Gentarō Yori’ie was still the overall winner of the competition for the reign.

Tribe Tuatha Firen came forth and announced that they would run the traditional War Practice Pick-a-Prize raffle this year and for two more years, but they seek another household, shire, Barony, or other group of people to take over at that time. Any who are interested, please seek out Baron Caleb to begin discussions of the procedures required.

Klaus von Dofster was Awarded Arms for rendering last-minute emergency assistance to the Crown. Scroll forthcoming.

Lady Alays de Gant was elevated to the Order of the Keystone for her service to the equestrian community of Æthelmearc. Scroll by THL Eleanore Godwin.

Lady Alays de Gant. Photo by Mistress Hilda.

Master Emrys Eustace hygt Broom was inducted into the Order of the Keystone for his service as webminister and copy editor. Scroll in progress by THL Renata la Rouge.

Master Emrys Eustace hyght Broom. Photo by Arianna.

Lord Robert MacEwin of Thornhill was created a Companion of the Sycamore for his love of the fiber arts, most particularly spinning. Scroll by Mistress Gillian Llewellyn of Ravenspur.

Lord Robert MacEwin of Thornhill. Photo by Arianna.

Minamoto-dono no Taikawa Saiaiko was Granted Arms, elevated to the senior sixth court rank and named to the Order of the Fleur d’Æthelmearc for her study and teaching of Japanese culture. Scroll illuminated by Lady Isabel Fleuretan and calligraphed by Kameshima-kyō Zentarō Umakai.

Minamoto-dono no Taikawa Saiaiko. Photo by Mistress Hilda.

Lady Fiora d’Artusio was Granted Arms and elevated to the Order of the Fleur d’Æthelmearc for her teaching of period fencing techniques and her skill at scribal arts. Scroll by THL Alianora Bronhulle, medallion by Duchess Branwyn ferch Gwythyr.

THLady Fiora d’Artusio. Photo by Arianna.

Don William Parris was inducted into the Order of the Fleur d’Æthelmearc for his in-depth study and teaching of period fencing manuals and techniques. Scroll by Lady Maria Ariadne.

Don Will Parris. Photo by Mistress Hilda.

Mistress Mahin Banu Tabrizi was created a Companion of the Fleur d’Æthelmearc for her enthusiastic learning, teaching and creation of woven trim and tapestry arts. Scroll illuminated by Baroness Alex and calligraphed by Kameshima-kyō Zentarō Umakai.

Mistress Mahin Banu Tabrizi. Photo by Arianna.

Duke Marcus Eisenwald was inducted into the Order of the Fleur d’Æthelmearc in absentia for his great skill in costuming, especially in creating garb by hand. Scroll forthcoming.

THL Meadhbh inghean ui Bhaoghill was elevated to the Order of the Millrind for her years of service to the equestrian community and to the Pennsic tollner. Scroll by Countess Aidin ni Lier.

THLady Meadhbh inghean ui Bhaoghill. Photo by Mistress Hilda.

THL Hrefna Ulfvarrinsdottir was served a Writ of Summons, that she might appear before Their Majesties’ Heirs and sit vigil in contemplation of elevation to the Order of the Pelican in recognition of her service as historian and order clerk, as well as her support of her Shire. Scroll illuminated and calligraphed by THL Ismay Ponde upon wording by Count Sir Jehan de la Marche.

THLady Hrefna Ulfvarrinsdottir. Photo by Mistress Hilda.

THL Zoe Akropolitina was served a Writ of Summons, that she might appear before Their Majesties’ Heirs and sit vigil in contemplation of elevation to the Order of the Pelican in recognition of her service to the Youth Combat community and to her Barony and Kingdom. Scroll illuminated by Meisterin Felicitas Flußmüllnerin and calligraphed by Fa Ren Zhang Ming Li.

THLady Zoe Akropolitina. Photo by Mistress Hilda.

Mistress Shishido Tora Gozen with Their Majesties. Photo by Arianna.

Shishido-nagon Tora Gozen was called forth to answer Their Majesties’ question posed earlier that day. Before she could answer, though, she felt that she needed to be relieved of the obligation of Kingdom Equestrian Officer. THL Meadhbh inghean ui Bhaoghill was summoned forth and named as Shishido-nagon’s successor to that office. Now freed of that obligation, Shishido-nagon was free to accept elevation to the Order of the Laurel. Rhiannon Elandris spoke on behalf of the Order of the Golden Lance of Gozen’s inspiration, love and passion for all things equestrian, and that she makes others want to try new things and get better at the things they already do. His Highness, Duke Sir Timothy, explained that he did not fully understand what the word “peer” meant until he moved to Æthelmearc, and few exemplified Peerage better than Gozen. Viscount Syr Bear recounted how he and Viscountess Judith had elevated Gozen to the ranks of nobility, and was pleased to see her perseverance and skill had grown. Master Tigernach mac Cathail, OP, spoke to her service to the equestrian arts already evidenced by her status as a Companion of the Pelican, as well as her devotion to the animal arts A&S display at Pennsic. Mistress Ysabeau Tiercelin conveyed the words of Master Alexander Caithness, OL, who had, along with Mistress Rannveigr, been asked to start the equestrian program in Æthelmearc and had chosen Gozen as one of their first marshals. Her Majesty spoke of Gozen helping Their Majesties get authorized in equestrian arts in order to help Her fulfill Her dream of riding horseback in Gulf Wars Opening Ceremonies, including escorting Her when She was thrown from Her horse. Gozen was presented with a broach bearing the badge of the Order by the Æthelmearc Equestrians and – at long last – her hitatare by Mistress Ysabeau Tiercelin. A scroll illuminated by Mistress Una de Saint Luc and calligraphed by Mistress Daedez was read, and Kameshima Silver Buccle explained to Their Majesties and the populace that, while there were many honorifics that would be appropriate in our Society to refer to Peers, there was one that was used in period to refer to the head of a school of a particular art. In that vein, Shishido-iemoto Tora Gozen was then proclaimed a Companion of the Laurel to the acclaim of all present.

Mistress Cori Ghora, newest Jewel of Æthelmearc. Photo by Mistress Hilda.

Baroness Ekaterina Volkova, the Jewel of Æthelmearc, was summoned forth to return the Jewel medallion so that it might be passed to the next recipient. Their Majesties then called forth Mistress Cori Ghora and, in thanks for everything that she does for the Kingdom and the populace, and for the example that she sets, named her the 38th Jewel of Æthelmearc. Scroll etched in copper by Baroness Ekaterina Volkova.

Her Majesty reminded the populace that Æthelmearc’s fencing and archery armies are not as numerous as will be needed to repel the combined Eastern and Midrealm forces that will bear down on Æthelmearc this coming summer, and encouraged all with an interest in those areas to attend their local practices and train for the upcoming War.

Dame Bronwyn MacFhionghuin announced that she was in possession of tutorial kits for Her Highness’s Pennsic favors, and invited one and all who were interested in helping to construct them to contact Her Excellency.

Their Majesties gave leave to Their Excellencies to hold their Baronial Court and announce the winners of the day’s Arts and Sciences Pentathlon.

There being no further business, Their Majesties’ Court was closed.


Categories: SCA news sites

17th c. Ottoman war camel unearthed in Austria

History Blog - Thu, 2015-04-02 07:01

In 2006, archaeologists excavating a site of a future shopping center in the town of Tulln on the Danube in Lower Austria discovered the skeleton of a large mammal. The location once boasted a tavern named “Auf der Rossmühle” (On the Mill) and it was in what would have been the tavern’s cellar that they found the skeleton. At first they thought it was a bovine or a very large horse, but archaeozoologist Dr. Alfred Galik identified it as a camel.

Testing of both the mitochondrial DNA and the nuclear DNA confirmed the morphological evidence that the animal was a hybrid of a dromedary mother and a Bactrian camel father. Its teeth and bones indicate the animal was an adult male, probably gelded, older than seven years. Lesions on the mandible show the camel was accustomed to wearing a harness and lesions on the shoulder blades were likely caused by the animal being made to rise and sit frequently to allow riders to mount and dismount. These are relatively minor repetitive stress deformities. Had the lad been used as a beast of burden, there would be significantly more damage to the bones. He was also fairly slender, so not ideally suited to bearing heavy loads but well suited as a riding animal. There are no signs of abuse or malnutrition. This guy was treated well.

Researchers were able to date the animal with some precision to the second half of the 17th century thanks to artifacts found buried in the backfill with the remains. A Rechenpfenning, a coin or token used for math calculations rather than legal tender, bearing the face of King Louis XIV dates to between 1643 and 1715. A lead bottle containing the cure-all theriac (I don’t think this one is going to get revived any time soon) labeled with the name of a Vienna apothecary’s shop placed it squarely in the 17th century as “Apotheke zur Goldenen Krone” was in business between 1628 and 1665. Documentary evidence found that the the property changed hands in 1690 which is doubtless when the cellar was backfilled for new construction above it.

While camel remains ranging in date from the Roman to the early modern era have been discovered before in Central Europe, they were disarticulated bones or partial skeletons at best. This is the first complete camel skeleton found and the timing makes it all the more intriguing because the late 17th century saw the final culmination of three centuries of war between Habsburg Austria and the Ottoman Empire where the camels came from. The overwhelming victory of the allied European powers at the Battle of Vienna in September of 1683 marked the turning point. Fighting continued until the Treaty of Karlowitz was signed in 1699, but the Ottoman forces were on the defensive the entire time and ultimately lost Hungary and Transylvania for good.

One of the leaders of the Holy League alliance, King of Poland John III Sobieski, who famously led the largest cavalry charge in history (18,000 horsemen) to inflict the coup de grace on the struggling Ottomans at the Battle of Vienna, wrote to his wife afterwards:

God and our Lord forever blessed be, He gave victory and glory to our people as the past centuries never knew before. All over the camp, countless riches fall into our hands. The enemy, their dead littering fields and the camp, flees in confusion. Camels, mules, cattle, sheep, which it had on the sides, our troops now take….

Tulln is just 25 miles northwest of Vienna. It was the staging ground where the allied troops met before the Battle of Vienna. Perhaps this camel made his way to the city as part of the spoils King John III Sobieski mentioned, or it may have been part of a peaceable exchange earlier that summer. Ottoman troops occupied the countryside around Tulln in August of 1683 but never conquered the town. Diplomatic channels were open since the Holy Roman Emperor’s ambassador and his secretary were released to Tulln by the Ottomans at that time.

We know it wasn’t still in Ottoman hands when it died, because they would have butchered it (which is part of the reason why there are so few complete camel remains found in Europe). There are no cut marks on the bone and the position of the articulated skeleton means it was buried intact. Researchers believe the camel may have been kept as an exotic animal exhibit in Tulln. With little experience in the care and feeding of camels and limited resources in a time of war, the locals probably wouldn’t have been ideal zookeepers. When the camel died a few years later, it was put in the cellar with a bunch of trash and covered by the backfill.

Categories: Arts and Sciences, History

Hilarious Heraldic Hijinks

East Kingdom Gazette - Wed, 2015-04-01 20:22

Every year the Eastern College of Heralds issues an April 1 Letter of Intent. Letters of Intent are submitted containing Name and Armory submissions. Most of the College throughout the Known World put up letters in OSCAR (Online System for Commentary And Response), and these items are all from the East’s letter.

Those in the Central Region & further north should particularly appreciate #30.

1: Amma Flammen Wurffer – New Name –

Submitter desires a feminine name.

Consulting herald: Helesone Flaming Sheep

All elements are found in the Family Search Historical Records:

Amma Ehin; Female; Christening; 01 Mar 1607; Biberach (OA. Biberach), Württemberg, Germany; Batch: C00368-5
Agnessa Flammen; Female; Christening; 15 Nov 1559; EVANGELISCH, GROETZINGEN, SCHWARZWALDKREIS, WUERTTEMBERG; Batch: C94434-1
Magdalena Wurffer; Female; Marriage; 29 May 1564; Stuttgart, Württemberg, Germany; Batch: M91614-9

Double surnames are permitted in German per Appendix C.

2: Badde Idea Beare – New Name

Meaning (a warning to others) most important.

Badde is a 16th century English surname which can be used as a given name by precedent [Alton of Grimfells, 4/2010, A-East]. It is found in the Family Search Historical Records:

Anne Badde; Female; Christening; 21 Mar 1551; SOLIHULL, WARWICK, ENGLAND; Batch: P01075-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JW6F-ZQ9)

Idea is a English given name also found in the Family Search Historical Records:

Idea Brownynge; Gender Unknown; Burial; 19 Dec 1570; Chilham, Kent, England; Batch: B03136-4 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JC57-DXQ)
Idea Wilkes; Female; Marriage; 23 Nov 1598; Ombersley, Worcester, England; Batch: M04028-2 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NKS4-466)

Double given names are found “late” in English per Appendix A of SENA.

Beare is a surname found in Hitching & Hitching, References to English Surnames in 1601 and 1602 at p. xxii

3: Bathowsse Babe – New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Language (English) most important.
Culture (English) most important.

Consulting herald: Helesone Flaming Sheep

Bathowsse is a 16th cen. English surname which is usable as a given name by precedent. [Alton of Grimfells, 4/2010 LoAR, A-East]:

William Bathowsse; Male; Burial; 06 Apr 1575; St. Botolph Aldgate, London, England; Batch: B00047-6 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JC9D-6Q6)

Babe is an English surname:

Madlyn Babe; Female; Christening; 12 Oct 1589; Rye, Sussex, England; Batch: C00086-4

4: Bilbo Biggens – New Name & New Device

Or, on an open book gules an annulet Or.

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Consulting Herald: Yehuda Matzoh Brei Omlet

Bilbo appears as a surname in “Index of Names in the 1582 Subsidey Roll of London” by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/english/alisurlondon1582.html). Sixteenth century English surnames can be used as given names by precedent. [Alton of Grimfells, 4/2010 LoAR, A-East]

Biggens is a gray-period English surname found in the Family Search Historical Records:

John Biggens, Male, 20 Mar 1630, Coveney, Cambridge, England, B01253-6, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NG65-2QJ

5: Bilbo Biggens – New Heraldic Will

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

The submitter provided the following statement:

My dear Bagginses and Boffins, Tooks and Brandybucks, Grubbs, Chubbs, Hornblowers, Bolgers, Bracegirdles and Proudfoots. Today is my one hundred and eleventh birthday! Alas, eleventy-one years is far too short a time to live among such excellent and admirable hobbits. I don’t know half of you half as well as I should like, and I like less than half of you half as well as you deserve. I, uh, I h-have things to do. I regret to announce — this is The End. I am going now. I bid you all a very fond farewell.

REDACTED, known in the Society as Gandálfr inn hvíti, attested to the following to Frodo Shireborne:

He’s gone to stay with the Elves. He’s left you Bag End along with all his possessions.

We believe this constitutes an acceptable Heraldic Will naming Frodo Shireborne as heir of the submitter. We apologize for the non-standard form.

6: Blue Clews – New Name & New Badge

Please consider the following possible conflicts identified by OSCAR (many will not be conflicts): Black Willow, House(3/1983), Blackwell, House (4/2002)

(Fieldless) A dog sejant affronty azure

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound (bloo cloos) most important.

Consulting heralds: Badde Idea Beare (name) and Conall Blue Dog (badge)

Blue is a 16th century English surname found in the Family Search Historical Records:

Godfridus Blue; Male; Marriage; 03 Feb 1577; Saint Michael, Tatenhill, Stafford, England; Batch: M00984-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V5KY-292)

By precedent, such surnames can be used as English given names. [Alton of Grimfells, 4/2010 LoAR, A-East].

Clews is found in the gray period in English in the Family Search Historical Records:

Anna Clews; Female; Christening; 01 Oct 1620; SAINT MICHAEL, TATENHILL, STAFFORD, ENGLAND; Batch: P00984-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V5LC-9BP)

7: Christmas Daye – New Name

Client requests authenticity for 16th cen. English.

Consulting herald: Badde Idea Beare

Christmas is found in Withycombe (3rd edition p.65, header) which states, “this, like other names of Church festivals, was sometimes given to children born on that day and is found from the 13th C down to the present day.” The Oxford English Dictionary (Compact ed. p.408) dates this spelling to 1568.

Daye is an English surname dated to 1569, 1574, 1574, 1584 and 1615 in “Surnames in Durham and Northumberland, 1521-1615″ by Julie Kahan (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juetta/parish/surnames_d.html).

8: Christmas Daye – New Alternate Name

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Please consider the following possible conflicts identified by OSCAR (many will not be conflicts): Noel Raphael(10/1985)

Noel Revel

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Client requests authenticity for 13th cen. French.
Language (French) most important.

Consulting herald: Badde Idea Beare

Noël is a male given name in “An Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris” by Colm Dubh (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/paris.html). The accent is an editorial addition that should be removed for registration. [Gregoire de Lille, 5/2010 LoAR, A-Lochac].

Revel is an unmarked surname dated to 1292 s.n. Revel at p. 171 of “DRAFT: Bynames in Medieval France (Sept. 2014)” by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/frenchbynames.pdf).

9: Costa Rica – New Name & New Device

Please consider the following possible conflicts identified by OSCAR (many will not be conflicts): Cassius Drusus(2/2007)

Azure, a fess gules fimbriated argent

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Consulting herald: Julia Chocolate Miaou

Costa is a masculine name dated to 1222 in Fehértói, in this header spelling. Kázmér s.n. Kosztafia (Costa’s son) says it’s a Slavic diminutive of Constantine, and dates the marked patronymic to 1548-1549. Although he includes no unmarked examples of this particular patronymic, such bynames were (and are) very common in Hungarian (as listed in Appendix A).

Rica is dated to 1211 as a masculine name in Fehértói, in this header spelling.

10: Dragon filius Grifonis – New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Meaning (Dragon, son of Grifon) most important.

Consulting herald: Julia Chocolate Miaou

Dragon is a Hungarian given name found in Fehértói s.n. Dragan: +1135/+1262/1566: Lampertus comes in villa Wouita terram … emit … a quodam nomine Dragon (something about Count Lampertus buying land from a guy named Dragon?).

filius Grifonis is a Latin marked patronymic found in Fehértói s.n. Greph: 1289/1302: vinea Eberhardi filii Grifonis ac pueorum eius “vineyard of Eberhard son of Grifon along with his boys” (or something like that).

11: Dragon Reborn – New Name & New Badge

Argent, an oriental dragon passant gules.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No changes.

Consulting herald: Robert Jordan

The submitter provided extremely voluminous documentation, some of which was clearly finished by someone else. Those volumes of paper can be simplified to the following:

Dragon is a 16th century English surname found in the Family Search Historical Records:

John Dragon, Male, Burial, 06 Jun 1597, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England, Batch: B00190-7 ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J853-5ZW )

By precedent, late period English surnames can be used as English given names. [Alton of Grimfells, 4/2010 LoAR, A-East]

Reborn is an English surname found in the Family Search Historical Records:

Thomas Reborn, Marriage, 1587, Glatton, Huntingdon, England, Batch: M16864-1 ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N6ZP-6BX )

Submitter prefers to depict the dragon with five toes, but his status as emperor is not clear. Submitter likely has the right to display a dragon with four toes, as he was proclaimed king.

12: Dragon Reborn – New Alternate Name

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Randal Thor

Submitter desires a masculine name.

The submitter’s primary name appears elsewhere on this letter.

Randal is an Anglicized Irish male name found s.n. Ranell, dated to 1602, in “Names Found in Anglicized Irish Documents” by Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnglicizedIrish/Masculine.shtml).

Thor is a 16th century English surname found in the Family Search Historical Records:

Nathaniel Thor; Male; Burial; 25 Feb 1589; Carlton-Castle, Lincoln, England; Batch: B02618-3 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JCMV-VYF)

13: Frodo Shireborne – New Name & New Device

Or, on an open book gules an annulet Or, a label azure.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Meaning (from the Shire) most important.

Consulting herald: Gandálfr inn hvíti

Frodo is an Old English male name dated to 1087 in the PASE database (http://www.pase.ac.uk/pdb?dosp=VIEW_RECORDS&st=PERSON_NAME&value=19591&level=1&lbl=Frodo)

Shireborne is a surname found in “Welsh names from Newport charters, 1385″ by Constanza of Thamesreach (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/constanza/newport-1385.html).

As Old English and English/Welsh are part of the same Language Group under Appendix C of SENA, there may be as much as 500 years between name elements. SENA PN.2.C.2.a.

The submitter was named as heir in a heraldic will found elsewhere on this letter. Therefore, the submitter is permitted to register a device conflicting with that of Bilbo Biggens differenced by a label.

14: Furius Heracles – New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Consulting herald: Euripides of Athens

Furius is a nomen found in “A Simple Guide to Imperial Roman Names” by Ursula Georges (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/roman.html)

Heracles is a cognomen found at p. 199 A Study of the Cognomina of Soldiers in the Roman Legions by Lindley Richard Dean (http://books.google.com/books?id=MF0KAAAAIAAJ).

15: Gandálfr inn hvíti – New Name Change

OSCAR NOTE: ‘Old Item’ should contain the former primary name. The form that is there is not a registered name.

Old Item: Gandálfr inn grái, to be released.
Submitter desires a masculine name.
Meaning (the white) most important.

Gandálfr is an Old Norse given name found in Geirr Bassi’s The Old Norse Name at p.10. By precedent, the name is registerable despite its literary association. [Da’ud ibn Auda 4/1991]

inn hvíti is an Old Norse byname meaning “white,” found in “Viking Bynames found in the Landnámabók” by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/norse/vikbynames.html).

The submitter supplied a lengthy persona story justifying the change, none of which is necessary for documentation. Damn entertaining, though.

16: Geva Dam – New Name

Please consider the following possible conflicts identified by OSCAR (many will not be conflicts): Guy of Aydon(1/2013)

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Meaning most important.

Consulting herald: Temperance Drinkwater

Geva is a feminine given name found in Talan Gwynek’s “Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames” s.n. Geva, dated to 1086, 1199 and 1313.

Dam is a surname dated to 1327 in R&W s.n. Dams.

17: Hodor Hodor – New Name

Consulting herald: Bran Stark

All elements are found in Zofia Abramowicz, Lila Citko, Leonarda Dacewicz. Słownik Historycznych Nazw Osobowych Białostocczyzny (XV-XVII w.) [Historical Dictionary of Personal Names in Białystok (15-17th centuries)], Vol. I. Białystok: Instytut Filologii Wschodniosłowianskiej Uniwersytetu w Białymstoku, 1997.

Hodor is a variant spelling of the attested Polish given name Chodor, dated to 1528 and 1545 (s.n. Chodor). The notes on this name state that it is an East Slavic form of the Old Church Slavonic Fieodor.

Examples of the interchangeability of H- and Ch- include the following names (in Polish-language examples):

  • s.n. Chmiel – Hmiel (1560) / Chmiel (1566)
  • s.nn. Chocin, Choc, Chocień – Hocin (1560) and Chocień (1560) are both derived from the given name Choc(z)
  • s.n. Choc(z)ewocz – Choczewicz / Hocewicz (1560)
  • s.n. Chodoszewic – Chodoszewic (1558, 1566) / Hodoszowic (1558
  • s.n. Chodziechowni – Hodziechowni (1551) is a compound name derived from the prototheme Chodz(i)-
  • s.n. Chw(i)edor – Chwiedor (1558, 1580) / Hwiedor (1640-1)

Polish names use patterns of unmarked patronyms (see Appendix A of SENA).

18: Hodor Hodor Hodor – New Name

Consulting herald: Bran Stark

All elements are found in Zofia Abramowicz, Lila Citko, Leonarda Dacewicz. Słownik Historycznych Nazw Osobowych Białostocczyzny (XV-XVII w.) [Historical Dictionary of Personal Names in Białystok (15-17th centuries)], Vol. I. Białystok: Instytut Filologii Wschodniosłowianskiej Uniwersytetu w Białymstoku, 1997.

Hodor is a variant spelling of the attested Polish given name Chodor, dated to 1528 and 1545 (s.n. Chodor). The notes on this name state that it is an East Slavic form of the Old Church Slavonic Fieodor.

Examples of the interchangeability of H- and Ch- in Polish include the following names:

  • s.n. Chmiel – Hmiel (1560) / Chmiel (1566)
  • s.nn. Chocin, Choc, Chocień – Hocin (1560) and Chocień (1560) are both derived from the given name Choc(z)
  • s.n. Choc(z)ewocz – Choczewicz / Hocewicz (1560)
  • s.n. Chodoszewic – Chodoszewic (1558, 1566) / Hodoszowic (1558
  • s.n. Chodziechowni – Hodziechowni (1551) is a compound name derived from the prototheme Chodz(i)-
  • s.n. Chw(i)edor – Chwiedor (1558, 1580) / Hwiedor (1640-1)

Polish names use patterns of unmarked patronyms (see Appendix A of SENA).

This name can be interpreted as having either a double given name or double surname. The name has the appearance of relationship conflict with Hodor Hodor, who appears elsewhere on this letter. Hodor Hodor has granted permission to conflict as long as there is at least one additional element in this name. The addition of another given name and a byname meets this requirement. This name has a relationship conflict with Hodor Hodor Hodor, but this name should be registerable because the submitter is assumed to allow permission to conflict with himself.

The consulting herald supplied the following: “I asked what name he wanted, and he just said, ‘Hodor’. I explained that we require a byname as well, and he offered one: ‘HODOR’. When I told him there was a conflict, he sounded sad, and said, ‘hodor’. I took it to mean that he allowed me to add this element.”

19: Hodor Hodor Hodor – New Alternate Name

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor

Consulting herald: Bran Stark

All elements are found in Zofia Abramowicz, Lila Citko, Leonarda Dacewicz. Słownik Historycznych Nazw Osobowych Białostocczyzny (XV-XVII w.) [Historical Dictionary of Personal Names in Białystok (15-17th centuries)], Vol. I. Białystok: Instytut Filologii Wschodniosłowianskiej Uniwersytetu w Białymstoku, 1997.

Hodor is a variant spelling of the attested Polish given name Chodor, dated to 1528 and 1545 (s.n. Chodor). The notes on this name note that it is an East Slavic form of the Old Church Slavonic Fieodor.

Examples of the interchangeability of H- and Ch- in Polish include the following names:

  • s.n. Chmiel – Hmiel (1560) / Chmiel (1566)
  • s.nn. Chocin, Choc, Chocień – Hocin (1560) and Chocień (1560) are both derived from the given name Choc(z)
  • s.n. Choc(z)ewocz – Choczewicz / Hocewicz (1560)
  • s.n. Chodoszewic – Chodoszewic (1558, 1566) / Hodoszowic (1558
  • s.n. Chodziechowni – Hodziechowni (1551) is a compound name derived from the prototheme Chodz(i)-
  • s.n. Chw(i)edor – Chwiedor (1558, 1580) / Hwiedor (1640-1)

Polish names use patterns of unmarked patronyms (see Appendix A of SENA) and double given names (Lillia de Vaux, “A Preliminary Survey of Names from the Historical Dictionary of Personal Names in Białystok, 2011 KWHSS Proceedings).

This name can be interpreted as having a double given name and double surname. The name has the appearance of relationship conflict with Hodor Hodor, who appears elsewhere on this letter. Hodor Hodor has granted permission to conflict as long as there is at least one additional element in this name. The addition of another given name and a byname meets this requirement. There is also a relationship conflict with Hodor Hodor Hodor, but the submitter is assumed to grant permission to conflict with himself.

20: Huge Suck Upp – New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Consulting herald: Ryan Hale Hydra

Huge is a 16th century English given name found in the Family Search Historical Records:

Huge Shakelton; Female; Marriage; 17 Oct 1557; Saint Martin, Birmingham, Warwick, England; Batch: M01072-1

Suck is an early 17th century English surname found in the Family Search Historical Records:

Abrie Suck; Female; Burial; 06 Sep 1625; St. Dunstan, Stepney, Middlesex, England; Batch: B02853-0

Upp is an early 17th century English surname found in the Family Search Historical Records:

Amy Upp; Female; Christening; 23 Oct 1625; SAINT ANDREW, PLYMOUTH, DEVON, ENGLAND; Batch: P00183-1

Double surnames are found in English per Appendix A of SENA.

21: Hurte de Eye – New Name & New Device

Per pale barry wavy azure and argent and barry wavy argent and gules, two concentric annulets counterchanged

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Consulting herald: Eynon Strayne

Hurte is a 16th cen. English surname found in the Family Search Historical Records:

John Hurte; Male; Marriage; 03 Sep 1583; Saint Giles Cripplegate, London, London, England; Batch: M02243-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NJ5H-XYS)

By precedent, such surnames can be used as given names. [Alton of Grimfells, 4/2010 LoAR, A-East].

de Eye appears as a place name in a Latin charter dated 1491 at pp. 525-26 of Report of the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts (https://books.google.com/books?id=Tj3YAAAAMAAJ).

22: Im Groot – New Name & New Device

Purpure, a mandrake proper issuant from a mazer argent

Consulting herald: Badde Idea Beare

Im is an English female given name found in the Family Search Historical Records:

Im Dytton; Female; Marriage; 24 Nov 1565; Somersby, Lincoln, England; Batch: M03148-2 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NV58-G5Y)

Groot is an English surname found in the Family Search Historical Records:

Jennett Groot; Female; Marriage; 26 Oct 1572; Howden, York, England; Batch: M00743-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N2S9-NZ3)

According to the Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry:

The mandrake is a plant whose root resembles a human figure; it is normally depicted with vague human features. It may also be called “mandragora”. The mandrake’s narcotic properties made it a favorite with mystics and herbalists.

In armory, the mandrake is rarely found in period armory: e.g., the arms of Bodyam or Bodyham, c.1540 [Dennys 129; cf. also BSB Cod.Icon 291:43]. The mandrake is affronty by default; Society practice grants it difference from a human figure.

23: Kata Kana – New Name

Please consider the following possible conflicts identified by OSCAR (many will not be conflicts): Koga Yoshitsune(6/1991)

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Culture (Hungarian-Japanese?) most important.
Meaning (Hungarian Japanese?) most important.

Consulting herald: Julia Chocolate Miaou

Kata is a Hungarian surname and given name. It is a header in Kázmér, dated in this spelling to 1541, and in the spelling Katha as early as 1402. As a family name, it most often originates as an unmarked matronymic based on a diminutive of Katalin (= Katherine). Kata is also a header in Fehértói, dated as a clan-name from 1220 and later, a feminine name from 1231 and later, and a masculine name from 1243 and later, spelled variously as Katha and Kata in all usages.

Kana is a Hungarian masculine name. It is a header in Fehértói, dated in this spelling to 1214, 1217, 1233, 1251, 1282, 1299, and 1300. Of these, the 1251 citation is part of a vernacular placename (Kanacuta: Kana’s well), showing that this name was the same in Latin and Hungarian. Therefore, the name is appropriate with the surname either first or last.

24: Lenny Briskoo – New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Consulting herald: Jerrigh Orbach

“In the College of Heralds, the submitters are served by two separate but equally important groups, the consulting and commenting heralds who investigate options, and the Submissions Heralds who return the offenders.”

Chung Chung!

Lenny is a gray-period English given name found in the Family Search Historical Records:

Lenny Lazen; Male; 13 Apr 1613; Guston, Kent, England; Batch: B03939-4 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JZCJ-NPB)

Briskoo is an italicized 16th/early 17th cen. Anglicized Irish surname found in Woulfe p. 232 s.n. Brioscú.

English and Anglicized Irish are part of the same Language Group under Appendix C of SENA.

25: Mad Margaret – New Name & New Device

Argent a violet purpure seeded Or within an orle of roses proper

Submitter desires a feminine name.

Consulting herald: Lijsbet Pu’erh Rose

Mad is an English female given name found in the Family Search Historical Records:

Mad Coleng; Female; Christening; 19 Apr 1590; SAINT GILES, READING, BERKSHIRE, ENGLAND; Batch: C01764-2 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NPLM-MHX)

Margaret is a late 16th century English given name found in “Late Sixteenth Century English Given Names” by Talan Gwynek (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/eng16/eng16ffreq.html). Unmarked matronymics are found in English per SENA Appendix C.

26: Mad Margaret – New Alternate Name

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Please consider the following possible conflicts identified by OSCAR (many will not be conflicts): Caergwen, House(6/1991), Caírech na hInnsi (2/2012), Caris Maniske (7/1985), Ceara Cháomhanach (3/2007), Ceara Shionnach (6/2012)

Crasey Megge

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound (cray-zee meg) most important.

Consulting herald: Lijsbet Pu’erh Rose

Crasey is an English given name found in the Family Search Historical Records:

Crasey Luchington; Female; Burial; 25 Feb 1635; Folkestone, England; Batch: B03582-0 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JC1V-N3F)

Megge is an English surname found in R&W s.n. Meggs dated to 1275.

27: Mad Margaret – New Alternate Name

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Poor Peg

Consulting herald: Lijsbet Pu’erh Rose

Poor is a 16th cen. English surname found in the Family Search Historical Records:

Elisabeth Poor; Female; Marriage; 18 Jul 1575; Rye, Sussex, England; Batch: M14836-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N6KJ-8J9)

Such surnames can be used as given names by precedent. [Alton of Grimfells, 4/2010 LoAR, A-East]

Peg is an English surname found in Bardsley s.n. Pegg dated to 1273.

28: Merlin bat Yoda – New Name

Submitter has no desire as to gender.
Culture (Jewish) most important.

Consulting Herald: Mort d’Arthur

Both name elements are from “A Jewish Memory Book: Nuremburg, 1349″ by Eleazar ha-Levi (Lew Wolkoff) in the Proceedings of the 2004 KWHSS.

Merlin – The “Memory Book” has four entries: Meralin eshet (wife of) Yosef, Merlin bot Yoel, Merlin eshet Avraham ha-Levi, and Miralin bot Hotzlin. Beider describes Merlin as a diminutive form of Miriam.

bat – SENA Appendix A lists “bat” (daughter of) as the form for female Hebrew patronymics.

Yoda – The given name Yoda is a variant of Yehudah. The name element appears twice in the “Memory Book:” Yoda bar Yakov and his son Yechiel bar Yoda. Also, Alexander Beider’s A Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names gives יודא.[Yod Vov (used as the vowel sound “oh”) Dalet Alef]’ 1392-1793 Frankfurt (28 persons), and Juda 1643-17991 Hamburg (99 persons).

29: Nice Asshe – New Name & New Device

Please consider the following possible conflicts identified by OSCAR (many will not be conflicts): Nakagawa Sukeie(12/2006), Noah Jay (1/2003), Nonesuche House (5/2012)

Argent, a chief doubly enarched sable

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Client requests authenticity for late period Ireland.

Consulting herald: Any Toole (name) and Istvan Potent Chief (device)

Nice is an Anglicized Irish male name dated to 1602 s.n. Nise in “Names Found in Anglicized Irish Documents” by Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnglicizedIrish/Masculine.shtml).

Asshe is an italicized 16th/early 17th cen. Anglicized Irish surname found in Woulfe p. 219 s.n. Ághas.

30: Noe More Snow – New Name & New Device

Please consider the following possible conflicts identified by OSCAR (many will not be conflicts): Ninian Morgan(7/2004)

Argent, on a chief azure three demi-towers issuant from the line of division Or

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound (No More Snow) most important.
Meaning (Please, No More Snow) most important.

Consulting Heralds: The entire EK College of Heralds

All elements are found in the Family Search Historical Records:

Noe Frost; Male; Burial; 16 Mar 1593;St. Botolph Aldgate, London, England; Bach: B00047-7 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JC98-KQ6)
Jone More; Female; Marriage; 18 Feb 1595; St. Botolph Aldgate, London, England; Batch: M00080-5 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NJQ4-336)
Frauncis Snow; Male; Christening; 01 May 1595; SAINT DUNSTAN, STEPNEY, LONDON, ENGLAND; Batch: C05576-5 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JMVM-QZJ)

Double surnames are found in English per Appendix A of SENA.

31: Peter Quill – New Alternate Name

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Starr Lord

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Meaning (Star Lord) most important.

Starr is a 16th century English surname found in “Index of Names in the 1582 Subsidy Roll of London” by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/english/engsurlondon1582n-z.html). By precedent, 16th cen. English surnames can be used as given names. [Alton of Grimfells, 4/2010 LoAR, A-East].

Lord is a surname appearing in Hitching & Hitching, References to English Surnames in 1601 and 1602 at p. xlviii

32: Peter Quill – New Household Name & New Badge

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Casa de Gamora

(Fieldless) A maiden vert crined gules and garbed sable

Meaning (Gamora’s house) most important.

Evidence for the pattern Casa de + surname in Spanish is found in the book Istoria de las bienandanzas e fortunas, by Lope Garcia de Salazar, written in the 1470s. Juliana Siren explains:

casa de X where X is a family name: we see both casa de los X and casa de X used interchangeably. This are mostly in the format “house and lineage/lineage and house” (casa e linaje/linaje e casa), so they’re clearly talking about a descent group rather than a physical location. Examples of casa de X from this book include: “casa e linaje de Mendoça,” “la casa de Velasco,” “casa e linaje de Guzman,” etc.

Gamora is a 16th century Spanish surname found in the Family Search Historical Records:

Antonio Gamora; Male; Christening; 12 Feb 1550; Medina del Campo, Valladolid, Spain; Batch: C87257-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FFMZ-N4B)
Juan Gamora; Male; Christening; 06 Sep 1533; SAN ESTEBAN, PORTILLO, VALLADOLID, SPAIN; Batch: J87320-2 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VWXL-R96)

The submitter therefore believes that Casa de Gamora fits the documented pattern. As both the named submitter and the nice green lady with him have very large guns, we are inclined to agree.

33: Rogue Flamenco – New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (Spanish) most important.
Culture (Spanish) most important.

Consulting Herald: Ermine Butterscotch Crampet

The entire name is found in Spain in the Family Search Historical Records:

Rogue Flamenco; Male; Christening; 28 Aug 1553; SAN MIGUEL, VALLADOLID, VALLADOLID, SPAIN; Batch: C87115-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FR73-4HL)

34: Scarlet O Hara – New Name & New Badge

(Fieldless) An aeolus contourny argent

Client requests authenticity for South.
Meaning (‘frankly, doesn’t give a damn’) most important.

Scarlet is an English given name found in the Family Search Historical Records:

Scarlet Stacy; Male; Christening; 11 Jun 1591; SAINT GREGORY BY SAINT PAUL, LONDON, LONDON, ENGLAND; Batch: C05426-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NYNC-6ML)

O Hara is an Anglicized Irish surname dated to 1602 found s.n. Cormock in “Names Found in Anglicized Irish Documents” by Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnglicizedIrish/Masculine.shtml)

English and Anglicized Irish can be combined under Appendix C of SENA.

According to the Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry, s.v. wind (http://mistholme.com/dictionary/wind/):

Winds are masses of air in natural motion. Invisible in nature, they’re depicted in art as a human heads issuant from cloud, usually shown visibly blowing air from their mouths. Frequently depicted in period art (e.g., on maps), we know of a single example in period armory, in the canting arms of de Zeffiro, c.1550 [BSB Cod.Icon 268:233].

In Society blazon, the generic wind may also be called an “aeolus”. Other types of wind include the “boreas”, an icy-bearded old man; the “zephyr”, an androgynous youth; and the female “mistral”. Winds face dexter by default, and should be shown in profile (though some are affronty); they should never be in trian aspect.

35: Silk Pouch – New Name

Consulting herald: Julia Chocolate Miaou

Silk is based on Fehértói s.n. Selk, where the spelling Sylk is dated to 1292 as the name of a landowner. I/y switches are common in these records, to the point that Fehértói treats the letters as equivalent, uniformly using ‘i’ in headers and cross-references.

Pouch is a Hungarian surname dated in this spelling to 1383 s.n. Pócs in Kázmér. It’s an unmarked patronymic based on an old diminutive of Pál (= Paul). It is also found as a secondary header under Poch in Fehértói Katalin: _Árpád-kori személynévtár_ (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 2004), dated to 1275 and 1300 as a masculine name.

36: Simon Peres – New Name

Please consider the following possible conflicts identified by OSCAR (many will not be conflicts): Schönberg, Haus(1/1995), Simon Briggs (11/2011), Simon Piroska (7/2002), Susannah of York (12/2013)

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (Anglo-Hungarian?) most important.
Culture (Anglo-Hungarian?) most important.

Consulting herald: Julia Chocolate Miaou

Simon is an English male given name found in R&W s.n. Simon: Simon 1134-40, William le fiz Simon Hy2, William, John Simon 1291, 1296.

Peres is a surname found in R&W s.n. Pierce: Geoffrey Peres 1237.

Alternatively, Simon is found as a given name in “Hungarian Personal Names of the 16th Century” by Walraven van Nijmege (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/hungarian/index.html#thelist) dated to 1560 and 1574.

Peres is found in Kázmér s.n. Peres: This spelling continuously from 1391. Occupational term meaning “lawyer”.

37: Simon Peres – New Alternate Name

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Peres Simon

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (Anglo-Hungarian?) most important.
Culture (Anglo-Hungarian?) most important.

Consulting herald: Julia Chocolate Miaou

Peres is a male given name found in R&W s.n. Pierce: Peres le cordener 1292

Simon is an English surname found in R&W s.n. Simmons: William Simon 1291 and in R&W s.n. Simon: John Simon 1291, 1296.

Alternatively, Peres is a Hungarian occupational byname meaning “lawyer” found in Kázmér s.n. Peres: This spelling is found continuously from 1391.

Simon is a Hungarian male given name found, among other places, in Kázmér s.n. Német: 1557 Nemet Simon.

38: Socrates Thunder – New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound (THUN-DER!) most important.
Language (English) most important.
Culture (English) most important.

Consulting Herald: Badde Idea Beare

The entire name is found in the Family Search Historical Records for England:

Socrates Thunder; Male; Marriage; 15 May 1585; High Ercall, Shropshire, England; Batch: M00896-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N28L-2Z5)

39: Soyland Greene, Barony of – New Order Name

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Award of No-merit

Consulting herald: Badde Idea Beare

This Order name follows the pattern of naming orders after the given names of individuals. The May 2011 LoAR states that “[a] given name can be used to create an order name (one named after a founder or inspiration).” [Order of Taillefer, 5/2011 LoAR, A-Lochac].

No-merit is an English given name dated to 1589 in Bardsley’s Curiosities of Puritan Nomenclature

40: Soyland Greene, Barony of – New Order Name & New Badge

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Order of Ebola

Argent goutty de sang, a fess wavy azure

Sound (ee-bow-lah) most important.

Consulting herald: Badde Idea Beare

This award is intended for those whose enthusiasm for serving the Barony is infectious.

This Order name follows the pattern of naming orders after the given names of individuals. The May 2011 LoAR states that “[a] given name can be used to create an order name (one named after a founder or inspiration).” [Order of Taillefer, 5/2011 LoAR, A-Lochac].

Ebola is a German female given name found in the Family Search Historical Records:

Ebola Helkings; Female; Marriage; 09 Apr 1622; Borken, Westfalen, Preußen, Germany; Batch: M98571-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4XM-WMF)

The Lingua Anglica Order of can be used with the German Ebola per SENA NPN 1.B.2.

41: Soyland Greene, Barony of – New Branch Name & New Device

Or, in pale a cubit arm palewise gules emergent from a flesh-pot all between three laurel wreaths vert.

Meaning (is people!) most important.

Consulting heralds: Butterscotch Crampet (name) and Matzoh Brei Omelet (armory)

Barony is one of the designators for local groups per SENA Appendix E.

Soyland – Watts, s.n. Soyland Moor. The entry says it’s derived from the the place name Soyland + ModE moor. Soyland = ‘newly-cultivated swamp land’. Dated instances include Soyland(e) (dated 1542-1649), and Soyland Mo(o)r(e) (dated 1624).

Greene – surname found in Hitching & Hitching, dated 1601-2. Green in various spellings is also part of compound place names, such as in the example Acton Green (dated 1640), Watts, s.n. Acton Green.

The pattern of toponym + surname is found in Juliana de Luna, “Compound Placenames in English” (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/EnglishCompoundPlacenames/). Early Modern English examples of such manorial additions include Broughton Astley (dated from 1535) and Broughton Pouges (dated 1526), Marsh Gibbyon (dated 1553×1601), and Lye Dallamer (dated 1558×1601), found in Watts, s.nn. Broughton, Marsh, and Leigh, respectively.

A petition in support of the name was provided. We’re uncertain why there are bite marks on the paper . . .

42: Soyland Greene, Barony of – New Heraldic Title

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Hunger Pursuivant

SENA NPN 1.B.4 states that the standard heraldic designators for heraldic titles for Kingdoms are Herald and Pursuivant.

“Heraldic Titles from the Middle Ages and Renaissance” by Juliana de Luna (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/HeraldicTitles/) provides evidence of English heraldic titles based on surnames.

Hunger is an English surname found in the Family Search Historical Records:

Jhoone Hunger; Female; Marriage; 3 Jan 1599; St. Marys, Leyton, Essex, England; Batch: M16395-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NKXV-3H7)

43: Tooth Feri – New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (Hungarian) most important.
Culture (Hungarian) most important.

Consulting herald: Julia Chocolate Miaou

Tooth is a Hungarian surname meaning “Slav, Slovak” dated in this spelling to 1542 s.n. Tót in Kázmér Miklós: _Régi Magyar Családnevek Szótára_ (Magyar Nyelvtudományi Társaság, Budapest, 1993).

Feri is a masculine name dated to 1560 in Walraven van Nijmegen: “Hungarian Personal Names of the 16th Century” (heraldry.sca.org/names/hungarian/index.html). Feri is a diminutive of Ferenc (= Francis), which means that it is appropriate in a vernacular context, where the surname comes first.


Filed under: Heraldry

Breaking News: A Brief History of Fart Jokes

AEthelmearc Gazette - Wed, 2015-04-01 19:10

NOT SAFE FOR WORK!

Some manuscript examples in the links below contain medieval drawings of nudity, which may or may not contain intimate body parts your boss will hate to see on your work monitor/device. Seriously. You might not want to show your squeamish spouse, either. In fact, I’m not too sure I want to see them again. Read on at your own intellectual peril, because fart jokes, while perfectly historical, may cause your employer to fire you and your I.Q. to drop alarmingly. ~Aoife

Img: The Fridge Art Society    

Just in time for April Fool’s Day, I am …proud? No. …excited? Not quite. Superlatives fail me, but I have plumbed the depths of the internet to find something funny to satisfy your inner twelve-year-old on this esteemed holiday.

Our historical counterparts weren’t as squeamish as we modern versions might be when it comes to bodily functions. And hey, show me somebody who has never laughed at a fart joke, and I will show you some pantalones del fuego. Here, for your delectation therefore, I present to you a list containing images and anecdotes of historical folks making themselves one with the internal winds of nature. From Shakespeare to Abu Hassan, who farted so loudly that it was used as a time reference from then on (you know, like ‘after the Hurricane’). Behold, the power of farting.

I shall now slink ashamedly into my cave and beat myself with a cat o’ nine tails until a more adult topic comes to mind for my next links list. Suggestions welcome.

Cheers,

Aoife
Dame Aoife Finn of Ynos Mon
m/k/a Lis Gelatt
…somewhere in Aethelmearc.

Who knew illuminated manuscripts contained so many fart and poop jokes?  This is a brief article on farts and related bodily functions in marginalia, as those weird little decorations on medieval manuscripts are called. Oh, how the creation of those drawings must’ve been very tedious, given all the naughty illustrations they contain. There are links to more images, in comments at the end of the article.

Img: People of Color in European Art History

Saturday Timewaster: Japanese Fart Scrolls  “I did find out enough to know that this isn’t the only farting scroll out there in existence – in fact, in the 90s, a collection of fart scrolls sold for $1,500 at the famous Christie’s auction house.” So says Hiyoshi, the page author. Sadly, he also made a video to accompany the images. I was not brave enough to try it, but go ahead. You know you want to.

Collectors Weekly: Naughty Nuns, Flatulent Monks, and Other Surprises of Sacred Medieval Manuscripts   Kaitlyn Manning of B. L. Rare Books and Manuscripts said ““I think it’s such a shock when you have this idea in your head of what medieval society was like,…and then you see these bizarre images that make you question your assumptions.” The wild mixture of illustrations challenges our contemporary need to compartmentalize topics like sex, religion, humor, and mythology.”

Funny Junk: Medieval Marginals  “Medieval Marginalias, dating from 500-1500 CE. In these photos we see that the true evolution of the human race is only the methods in which we consume fart, poop, and penis jokes. And of course, a vast number of homicidal bunnies.”

IMG source: Portable TV

 UltraGross: The Fart Jokes of William SHakespeare  “Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! Rage, blow!” The authors of Ultra Gross have combed Shakespeare for references to flatulence. You might be surprised at how many references they found!

Portable TV. Fart Proudly: The Best Fart Jokes in the Classics   This web article is in the form of a slideshow. From Ulysses to Benjamin Franklin, scholarly hours have been spent reading and combing the classics for fart references. As far as juvenile-subject work goes, I am amazed that this was a terrific read.

Further Fart Reading

Ramsey G. 2002. ‘A Breath of Fresh Air: Rectal Music in Gaelic Ireland’ in  Archaeology Ireland Vol. 16, No. 1. Dublin.

Enders, Jody, Ed./Trans. 2011 “The Farce of the Fart” and Other Ribaldries:  Twelve Medieval French Plays in Modern English. Philadelphia.

Yes, those books are real, scholarly works on farting. No joke.


Categories: SCA news sites

What Does Your Heraldry Actually Say About You?

AEthelmearc Gazette - Wed, 2015-04-01 17:09

An SCA device can be viewed as a Rohrschach test to learn more about the Scadian who registered it. Let’s see what these devices tell us about their owners, shall we?

Here are 16 actual registered devices of people in Æthelmearc. Please note that this is all intended in good fun, and since most of these belong to people we call friends, we hope it’s taken that way!

1. You like to stick needles in Scotsmen’s kilts. Or sometimes maybe into the Scotsmen.

Click to see whose arms these are

2. You have a complicated relationship with deer.

Click to see whose arms these are

3. You have no interest in drawing anything but straight lines.

Click to see whose arms these are

4. You may have a slight fixation on swords.

Click to see whose arms these are

5. You played too much Frogger as a kid.

Click to see whose arms these are

6. You have some pretty bizarre nightmares.

Click to see whose arms these are

7. You’re a big fan of Dr. Seuss.

Click to see whose arms these are

8. You are a pool shark.

Click to see whose arms these are

9. You are practicing to be a hypnotist.

Click to see whose arms these are

10. You have a little list of people you want to shoot. Nine of them, to be precise.

Click to see whose arms these are

11. You are obsessed with the musical “Cats.”

Click to see whose arms these are

12. You like people to think you’re just a sweet, non-threatening girl. Then when they get close enough, you stab them.

Click to see whose arms these are

13. You are secretly an alien who came here from another planet.

Click to see whose arms these are

14. You have murder on your mind.

Click to see whose arms these are

15. You really dig French vampires.

Click to see whose arms these are

16. We… uh… just… what?

Click to see whose arms these are

Bonus points if you can identify the owners of these arms!

Happy April Fool’s Day!

It’s all Arianna’s fault.

All images taken from the Æthelmearc Kingdom Roll of Arms, which is maintained by Mistress Alheydis von Körckhingen.


Categories: SCA news sites

You Won’t Believe These Images Are From Real Medieval Manuscripts!

AEthelmearc Gazette - Wed, 2015-04-01 14:49
You’ve seen SCA scrolls with miniatures, but you’ve never seen anything like THESE before!

In the interest of keeping this a family-friendly site, we’re only using images that qualify as G, PG, or PG-13. But trust us, our medieval ancestors were… earthy… folk. Sometimes with a twisted sense of humor.

These images are from actual medieval manuscripts, and are usually referred to as grotesques or drolleries. They often appear in the margins of 13th-15th century manuscripts.

We’re not sure what this beastie is, but we’re glad someone has it under control, even if riding it naked looks like an ill-advised plan.

Is this break dancing or yoga?

Talk about angry birds….

There’s one in every crowd. Sometimes two.

 This looks like proof that “Grays” visited us long before there was an Area 51.

The original Pushme-Pullyu, only backwards:

Our ancestors seem to have had a strange fear of giant rampaging snails.

They also seem to have believed that bunnies were going to take over the world, or maybe kill us all in our sleep.

Or maybe bunnies and snails will just go after each other.

And then there are women using their distaffs in battle.

There are also some pretty wacky human-animal hybrid critters:

And then there are the ones that defy description:

    

      

Happy April Fool’s Day!

It’s all Arianna’s fault.

Images are taken from the Macclesfield Psalter, the Luttrell Psalter, the Croy Hours, the Gorleston Psalter, the Rutland Psalter, the Vaux Psalter, the Missale Romanum of Amiens, and Le Livre du Lancelot du Lac.

Yes, real medieval manuscripts. And we didn’t even include the really creepy ones.


Categories: SCA news sites

Future SCA Events to Take Place Only in Facebook

SCAtoday.net - Wed, 2015-04-01 13:07

Bowing to the inevitable, the Board of Directors of the SCA Inc. has announced that beginning May 1, 2016, all SCA events will take place in cyberspace, using Facebook.

read more

Categories: SCA news sites

It Has Been Rumored…

AEthelmearc Gazette - Wed, 2015-04-01 12:10

It has been rumored that a wealthy industrialist is so inspired to become King that he seeks a current Kingdom to move in to. He would then open one of his large call centers there and each employee would receive an SCA membership as a benefit of employment. That Kingdom would benefit from having new members and employment for any current SCA member who needs a job. In return the wealthy capitalist would like to grow that area into a Principality and then to a Kingdom without the usual policy, long period waits and rules, wink-wink nudge-nudge, where he would sit as King as often as possible via a tournaments where the boss should win.

It has been rumored that being able to perform a period dance shall be a requirement of a Peerage and each member of said Orders will have to dance publicly at least once per year as physical limitations allow.

It has been rumored that Hedgehogs are not actually made of Hedgehog.

It has been rumored that SCA electronic publications like supplements are held prisoner by the SCA and cannot be republished outside the SCA newsletter website even if they are multiple years old.

It has been rumored that a new ten-page disclaimer, waiver, and standard celebrity form has been commissioned to cover all past, current, and future disclaimer, waiver, and celebrity needs. New offices will be formed for the proper administration, evolution, and storage of said forms, as said forms could evolve intelligence, gain speech, and eventually eat someone. If all goes well such new officers could create hundreds of new novel disclaimer, waiver, and standard celebrity addendums leading to thousands of service Grant and Peerage memberships.

It has been rumored that what happens in Lochac stays in Lochac.

It has been rumored that there are so many local events that they will soon be rationed so that in addition to Kingdom events, each Barony may hold only two events plus their champions tourney, and Cantons and Shires may hold only one event each. The only exception is holding a Kingdom event such as Crown, Coronation, or an Academy.

It has been rumored that given enough time, the Office of Redundancy will create rules so brilliantly complex and encompassing that both the Tax and Penal codes will fall to their knees and cower in the wake of the new legislation. The sections on period alcohol and shoes alone will require a Doctorate in Weasel Wrangling.

It has been rumored that illicit cloved oranges led to more than one slapping.

It has been rumored that the Children’s Water War will count as a War Point. Red and blue dyes will be supplied to each side for a thirty-minute siege of the Castle with “res” points.

Photo by Grizzly of Ironstar from the Pennsic Independent

It has been rumored that the Lost Boys have been found.

It has been rumored that the phrase “or we could get sued” will be added to the end of each new rule in Corpora.

It has been rumored that by the rules of Chivalry and decency, what happens on the Battlefield late at night should not be announced on Social Media the next morning.

It has been rumored that Jugging will become the official sport of sophisticated Kingdoms.

It has been rumored that private parties in private camps may ask Bards to leave if they cannot perform naughty drinking ditties.

It has been rumored that this is April Fools and all of this is nonsense and could not possible be taken as true in any way or form, but to avoid any lawsuits, please sign this standard disclaimer, waiver, standard celebrity form.

It has been rumored that no Moose were injured in the writing of this article.

Thank you and carry on good citizens.

We can neither confirm nor deny the rumor that this post was written by Master Filippo de Sancto Martino.

Happy April Fool’s Day!


Categories: SCA news sites

Pennsic Blood Drive Becomes Fully Authentic

SCAtoday.net - Wed, 2015-04-01 10:24

The traditional Pennsic Blood Drive, held the middle weekend between Peace Week and War Week, is getting an extreme makeover this year, as blood collection will now follow fully period medical practices.

read more

Categories: SCA news sites

Tir Mara Heraldic Submissions/Les Soumissions Héraldique Venant De La Principauté de Tir Mara

East Kingdom Gazette - Wed, 2015-04-01 09:37

En français

Greetings from Ryan, Brigantia Principal Herald of Kingdom the East!

When I took office over two years ago I quickly noticed a problem. When heraldic submissions came in from Tir Mara they had to be in US Funds. The Money order transfer fee would add $5CDN to the cost of the submission. Such an expense is patently unfair. I have been working with the Kingdom Submission Herald, Mistress Alys, and the Kingdom Exchequer, Mistress Ignacia, and we have been talking with several persons in Tir Mara during our travels in order to find a way to remove this burden from our Tir Maran members.

I’m happy to say that we’re finally about to put a solution into place. Starting in May Tir Marans will be able to submit their paperwork and send their fees to Baroness Jeanne de Robin from L’Ile du Dragon Dormant, our new Blue Alaunt Herald. She has agreed to bear the burden of collecting the funds for Tir Maran submissions and deposit the monies into a bank in Canada. Therefore the costly transfer fees will fall onto the College’s account once or twice a year instead of the individual submitter’s pocketbook for each individual submission.

In order to simplify the process, and to encourage Tir Maran submissions, for the time being the Fees for our Tir Maran heraldic submissions will be the same as the US fees, $8CDN.

As of May first heraldic Submissions from the Crown Principality of Tir Mara can be sent to:
Jeanne de Robin
Joanna Hobbins
PO Box 63515 CC VAN-HORNE
Montreal, QC
H3W 3H8

Please make checks payable to “SCA Inc. – East Kingdom”

As Always, in service to the Society, Kingdom, Crown, and College,
Ryan Brigantia

En français
Salutation de la part de Maitre Ryan, Brigantia Herald du Royaume de l’Est

Au moment où j’ai pris l’office de Hérault du Royaume il y a plus de deux ans j’ai rapidement pris conscience d’un problème. Les soumissions héraldique venant de la Principauté de Tir Mara devait être en dollar US. Le coût du transfert monétaire augmentait la facture de plus de cinq dollar par soumission. Ce coût supplémentaire est inéquitable. J’ai travaillé avec la responsable des soumissions du Royaume, Maitresse Alys ainsi que l’Échiquier du Royaume, Maitresse Ignacia. De plus nous avons aussi discutés avec plusieurs résidents de Tir Mara durant nos voyages pour trouver un moyen de retirer ce poids des épaules de la population de la Principauté.

Je suis heureux de vous annoncer que nous avons trouvé et mis en place une politique. Commençant au début Mai, les soumissionnaires pourront envoyer leurs documentations et paiement à Son Excellence Jeanne de Robin de l’Ile du Dragon Dormant, notre nouvelle « Blue Alaunt Herald ». Elle a accepté la responsabilité de recevoir les soumissions ainsi que l’argent pour ensuite déposer ce dernier dans une banque canadienne. Conséquemment le coût du transfert de devise sera assumé par le Collège des Hérault du Royaume de l’Est en lieu et place des coûts assumés auparavant par chaque soumissionnaire.

Dans le but de simplifier les procédures ainsi que motiver les résident de Tir Mara à faire des soumissions, jusqu’à édit contraire le coût par soumission sera au même montant que pour les habitant en territoire du sud de la frontière sans tenir compte du taux de change. Soit 8$ CND par soumission.

Commencant en Mai les soumissions de la population de Tir Mara devront être envoyé a :

Jeanne de Robin
Joanna Hobbins
PO Box 63515 CC Van-Horne
Montreal, QC
H3W 3H8

se il vous plaît faire les chèques payables à « SCA Inc. – East Kingdom »

Comme toujours au service de la Société, du Royaume, de la couronne et du Collège.
Ryan Brigantia

Traduction : Eginhard d’Aix la Chapelle


Filed under: Announcements, En français

12 Things You Didn’t Know About King Titus

AEthelmearc Gazette - Wed, 2015-04-01 09:00

So, you think you know King Titus? Well, think again. Here are some things that only his closest retainers and lackeys know about His Majesty, the King of Æthelmearc.

1. He won season 2 of Dancing with the Stars.

2. He wore a reindeer codpiece with a light-up nose to Steltonwald 12th Night.

3. He made his Broadway debut as King Arthur in Camelot.

4. He was voted “Sexiest King” at this year’s Estrella War.

5. He is a huge fan of Batman.

6. He has been turned into a meme more times than any SCA royal in history.

7. He is actually kind of shy.

8. He secretly hates going to court.

9. He’s the grandson of Yul Brynner.

10. He is a notorious photobomber.


11. He is adored by his dog.

12. And he adores his Queen.

Here’s the kicker – only 8 of these are actually true. Can you guess which ones? The answer will be revealed at the end of the day, so check back later!

Happy April Fool’s Day!

It’s all Arianna’s fault.

With thanks to everyone whose photos we stole appropriated borrowed used for this article.

And (drumroll…..) here are the correct answers:

  1. False, but only because he didn’t enter.
  2. True, though it was unveiled in all its… er… splendor only at the start of court.
  3. False, though His Majesty would no doubt make a notable Arthur.
  4. False, but if there had been such a vote, we are absolutely certain he would have won.
  5. True. In fact, he may well BE Batman.
  6. True. One of the royal retainers, Lady Rivka bat Daniyel, even provided an image with a transparent background solely for the purpose of meme creation. Many of the ones we posted here were created by Lady Minamoto Kumamoto Sakurako.
  7. Believe it or not, this is true. In a crowd of people he doesn’t know, when not on the throne, His Majesty can be a little shy.
  8. True only when he is not King. That’s why he’s always on a mission to make court fun.
  9. False, at least as far as we know.
  10. True. As you can plainly see.
  11. True. Except that technically, Molly was Her Majesty’s dog first, but she fell in love with Titus when he moved in and Her Majesty has played second fiddle to Titus (in the chihuahua’s mind) ever since.
  12. True. Obviously.

Categories: SCA news sites

Anglo-Saxon eye salve kills MRSA superbug

History Blog - Wed, 2015-04-01 07:09

Since Alexander Fleming first noticed that the Penicillium mold that had accidentally contaminated his petri dish was lethal to the Staphylococcus bacteria inside it in 1928, humans have become accustomed to a world where infections can be cured with no more effort than having to swallow a few uncomfortably large pills for a week. The days when a scraped knee could kill seem like ancient history, but they’re not. Bacteria have become increasingly resistant to the antibiotics in the medical arsenal and with very few new antibiotics discovered over the past two decades, the prospect of a world of infectious microbes we cannot kill has become a terrifying reality. According to the CDC, 23,000 people a year die from antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections.

Even Fleming knew the antibiotic gravy train ran on unstable tracks. He noted in the official Nobel Lecture (pdf) he delivered in the days leading up to the ceremony awarding him the 1945 Nobel Prize in Medicine: “It is not difficult to make microbes resistant to penicillin in the laboratory by exposing them to concentrations not sufficient to kill them, and the same thing has occasionally happened in the body.” The bacteria that survive the antibiotic onslaught and their descendants develop resistance to that antibiotic. If any survive the next antibiotic deployed against them, they become resistant to that one as well and on and on through the entire pharmacopoeia.

That’s how Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria came to set up shop particularly in hospitals because MRSA laughs at our puny human doctors with their losery old penicillins and amoxicillins. The rate of MRSA infections at US academic hospitals doubled between 2003 and 2008, and since there hasn’t been a new class of antibiotics discovered since the 1980s, MRSA and other drug-resistant bacteria are only getting stronger.

The potential disaster here is so far-reaching it’s hard to grasp. It’s not just pneumonia and injuries that used to be easily treated that will become many times more fatal. Cancer treatment, organ and device (mechanical knees, hips, etc.) transplants, dialysis, open-heart surgery, any surgery at all, for that matter, including plastic surgery, even getting tattoos all rely heavily on antibiotics to keep patients alive. See the World Health Organization’s Antimicrobial Resistance: Global Report on Surveillance (pdf) to learn more about the post-antibiotic apocalypse we’re facing.

Scientists all over the world are looking for new drugs to combat the rise of superbugs, among them a team from the University of Nottingham who have taken an approach so old it’s new again. The brain child of Dr. Christina Lee, an Anglo-Saxon expert from the University’s English department, the study tested the efficacy of a recipe for a salve to treat eye infections found in Bald’s Leechbook, a collection of remedies for illness written in Old English around 950 A.D. in Winchester that is now in the British Library. Here is a translation of the recipe in volume two of Oswald Cockayne’s outstandingly titled Leechdoms, Wortcunning, and Starcraft of Early England, published in 1864-6. (I need to integrate “wortcunning” into my daily vocabulary.)

Work an eye salve for a wen, take cropleek and garlic, of both equal quantities, pound them well together, take wine and bullocks gall, of both equal quantities, mix with the leek, put this then into a brazen vessel and let it stand nine days in the brass vessel, wring out through a cloth and clear it well, put it into a horn and about night time apply it with a feather to the eye; the best leechdom.

No disrespect to Oswald Cockayne and his mastery of the catchy book title, but his translation needed updating for use in a scientific context. Dr. Lee translated the recipe from the original manuscript, researching ambiguous words for optimal accuracy. Researchers, led by microbiologist Dr. Freya Harrison, were meticulous in recreating the recipe as faithfully as possibly, even securing the wine from a vineyard that is known to have been in use in the 9th century. They made four batches of the salve and a control batch without any of the vegetable ingredients, then applied Bald’s salve to well-established MSRA cultures (with a dropper, not a feather) and waited for 24 hours before counting the surviving bacteria.

The team made artificial wound infections by growing bacteria in plugs of collagen and then exposed them to each of the individual ingredients, or the full recipe. None of the individual ingredients alone had any measurable effect, but when combined according to the recipe the Staphylococcus populations were almost totally obliterated: about one bacterial cell in a thousand survived.

The team then went on to see what happened if they diluted the eye salve – as it is hard to know just how much of the medicine bacteria would be exposed to when applied to a real infection. They found that when the medicine is too dilute to kill Staphylococcus aureus, it interfered with bacterial cell-cell communication (quorum sensing). This is a key finding, because bacteria have to talk to each other to switch on the genes that allow them to damage infected tissues. Many microbiologists think that blocking this behaviour could be an alternative way of treating infection.

Bald’s onion and bile salve, it turns out, is an MRSA-killing machine.

Dr Harrison commented: “We thought that Bald’s eyesalve might show a small amount of antibiotic activity, because each of the ingredients has been shown by other researchers to have some effect on bacteria in the lab – copper and bile salts can kill bacteria, and the garlic family of plants make chemicals that interfere with the bacteria’s ability to damage infected tissues. But we were absolutely blown away by just how effective the combination of ingredients was. We tested it in difficult conditions too; we let our artificial ‘infections’ grow into dense, mature populations called ‘biofilms’, where the individual cells bunch together and make a sticky coating that makes it hard for antibiotics to reach them. But unlike many modern antibiotics, Bald’s eye salve has the power to breach these defences.”

It worked in vivo, too, on mice with MRSA-infected skin wounds at Texas Tech University.

As promising as this study is, it’s still in the early stages. The AncientBiotics program is crowdfunding to hire a summer intern to help them move forward briskly with this incredibly exciting research. They just reached their goal of £1,000 so they’ll definitely get funded, but given the modesty of the original goal and the global importance of this project, I’d love to see them raise a lot more than that. There are 26 days left in the fundraiser. Donate!

Categories: Arts and Sciences, History

Viking Artifact Surfaces In Delaware River

AEthelmearc Gazette - Wed, 2015-04-01 07:00

Half of a Bishops Crozier-turned-Viking-plunder, twin of the one found in the Delaware River during a dredging project.

Photo: Museum of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Norway

Reuters 21 April 2015

Scientific American via University of Pennsylvania Department of Antiquities written by Inglenook Rosebottom

Philadelphia, PA. Crews dredging the Delaware river in Philadelphia have come across something amazing. Spring thaw and run off have built silt to alarming levels after a winter of excessive snowfall. It is a yearly tradition that Philadelphia city crews dredge the mouth of the river to prevent flooding. This year is no exception.

Many unusual items have come to light during the annual project. Including, in the past, the remains of Native American canoes, a pristine but waterlogged Audi R8 valued at $100,000, bags of garbage and drug paraphernalia, and the torso of a then-unidentified Caucasian male in 1998. This year’s top find, however, is causing quite a stir. Chief amongst the questions asked is this: “How did it get there?”

Gleaming up from the wet silt piled into the bed of a city crew truck, a mysterious artifact surfaced that has the history department at the University of Pennsylvania, which oversees the project, baffled. Chief archaeologist Wilhelm Lagerschmidt cautioned readers to take the find at face value, and not attach any speculative history to the find.

What is it, though? It turns out, against all odds, that the piece has an identical twin. That twin, pictured above, is currently residing in the museum of the University of Science and Technology in Norway. The twin artifact in Norway has a long an convoluted history of its own. Once, in approximately the eighth or ninth century, it was the head of a Bishop’s Crozier from the North of England. The richly jeweled and filigreed piece was probably seized as plunder or passed as trade goods by Vikings from Norway.

An enterprising Norwegian, having acquired the piece, chopped the fancy gold ball in half, and made it into two turtle-shell shaped pins, similar to but fancier than the cup brooches most Norwegian women would have worn at the time. This however, is where the twins part ways. Twin Two was found inside a tin box shaped like a church, in a Norwegian grave belonging to a high-status woman from the town of Romsdal. That grave itself was uncovered in 1961.

How Twin One got from Romsdal, Norway to Philadelphia, PA is a mystery that only time and investigation can unravel. “It is just as likely that it was stolen from the grave, traded on the black market, and lost in the river as a transaction went bad in this century, than it is that some Viking man or woman sailed down the coast of the North American continent and up the Delaware river,” Lagerschmidt cautioned. He continued, “At this point, the so-called runic stones found in Northern Pennsylvania, hauled from the edge of the Susquehanna river, are entirely unconnected by concrete evidence. Many believe them to be a hoax. But there is a little boy inside of me that is jumping up and down in joy, imagining that there were Viking Warriors on the river flowing past what would eventually become Philadelphia. It is finds such as these, which are fabricated from start to finish from real news (see link below), that we say unto you the reader, Happy First of April my friends.”

Shared by Dame Aoife Finn

Resource Information: NTNU


Categories: SCA news sites

Court Report: Gulf Wars, Kingdom of Gleann Abhann, 18-19 March AS 49

AEthelmearc Gazette - Tue, 2015-03-31 14:02

Documented from the Scrolls of the Reign of Titus and Anna Leigh, King
and Queen of Æthelmearc: the Business of Their Court at Gulf Wars in
the Kingdom of Gleann Abhann, 18-19 March AS 49. As recorded by
Maistir Brandubh Ó Donnghaile, Sigil Herald with the assistance of
Baron Robert O’Connor, Sycamore Herald.

Photo by Maistir Brandubh O Donnghaile

Wednesday March 18 on the Fencing Tournament Field

Don Orlando di Bene del Vinta. Photo by Lady Arianna dal Vallone.

Their Majesties invited the Assembled Royalty of the Known World in attendance, to bear witness as They issued a Writ of Summons to Don Orlando di Bene del Vinta to confer with Their Heirs, Timothy and Gabrielle, as to when he would accept entry into the Order of Defense. Writ by Catharine Wolfe.

Thursday March 19 in Æthelmearc Camp

King Titus and Queen Anna Leigh invited the members of the Golden Thorn to rise and then presented Helen of Avalon, THLady Cristina inghean Ghriogair, Lord Uaithne mac Faelin, Lady Ailis inghean Mhaolain, Lady Katerina McGilledoroughe, Lady Arianna dal Vallone, Master John the Pell, THLord Marek Viacheldrago, Master Tofi Kerthjalfadsson, Countess Genevieve du Vent Argent, Lady Phelippe Ulfsdotter, Don Annanias Fenne, Maistir Brandubh O’Donnghaile, Amalia Lesniak, Alaric of Steltonwald, Master Alastar MacCrummin, Meistress Myfanwy ferch Rhiannon, THLady Anna im Turm, THLady Ines of Alegria, Lady Cassandra de Matise, Lady Siobhan MacDermott, Mistress Shishido Tora Gozen, Lady Rowena McCara, THLady Alianora Bronhulle and Baron Ichijo Honen with Golden Thorns for their service to the crown in travelling to Gulf Wars to support the kingdom of Æthelmearc.

Sir Byron. Photo by Mistress Illadore de Bedagrayne.

Their Majesties then invited THLord Marek Viacheldrago, Sir Thomas
Byron of Haverford, and Don Orlando di Bene del Vinta to come forward and presented each with a scroll of appreciation as each had stood as a Champion of Æthelmearc to represent the kingdom in the War Point Tournaments.

Helen of Avalon was Awarded Arms for her service as she had attended the war to support the kingdom and assisted driving a van full of other’s gear. Scroll limned by Mary Ann of Seamarch, scrivened by HL Vistillia Messalina Pulcheria.

Baron Robert O’Connor, photo by Mistress Illadore.

Their Majesties called forth Lady Arianna dal Vallone and praised her for her skills in the fencing melees of the war, as she had singlehandedly stopped an Atlantian charge.

Baron Robert O’Connor was called forth and presented with theÆthel mearc Award of Excellence for serving as the land agent and camp organizer for the Gulf Wars camp.  Scroll limned by HL Signey of Starvanger, and scrivened by HL Vistillia Messalina Pulcheria.

THLady Phelippe Ulfsfotter, photo by Maistir Brandubh.

Lady Phelippe Ulfsdotter was called forth and inducted into the Order of the Millrind for her service to the Kingdom as Webminister and seeing the kingdom through many changes in the policies of that office.  Scroll by HL Lillius MacGuffin and Mistress Adela Scrijver van Brugge.

Baroness Katerina McGilledoroughe, photo by Maistir Brandubh.

Their Majesties called forth Lady Katerina McGilledoroughe and invited her friends to come forward and join her as They created her a Baroness of the Court for her service to Their Majesties as Head Retainer. Scroll by THLady Alianora Bronhulle.

Their Majesties then thanked all who had come to attend Gulf Wars and fight for Æthelmearc, and then dismissed the crowd to their entertainments.

There being no further business, Their Majesties’ Court was closed.

Photo by Mistress Illadore.

In Honor and Service,

Kameshima Zentarō Umakai
高貴国境の王国の治部卿
Silver Buccle Principal Herald, Kingdom of Æthelmearc


Categories: SCA news sites

Sistine Chapel "dazzles" after tech makeover

SCAtoday.net - Tue, 2015-03-31 12:45

A new lighting system will allow visitors to the Vatican's Sistine Chapel  to appreciate Michelangelo's famous frescoes more than ever better. The chapel makeover "cost some three million euros (US$3.77 million)—with 1.9 million euros spent on the lighting alone."

read more

Categories: SCA news sites

New Æthelmearc Arts & Sciences Website Debuts

AEthelmearc Gazette - Tue, 2015-03-31 11:28

The NEW Æthelmearc Kingdom Arts and Sciences website is up! You can see it here.

The Kingdom Minister of Arts & Sciences, Master Fridrikr Tomasson av Knusslig Hamn, and his Deputy, Mistress Orianna Fridrikskona, are excited to offer this great new resource to Æthelmearc’s artisans.

“The new A&S website is designed to make information gathering easier,” said Master Fridrikr. “We have a new calendar page, more space for images of Arts and Sciences from around the kingdom, [and] new areas for artisans to share their work. It is streamlined and user-friendly. I hope that everyone will go and look at it, and that the artisans and scholars of Æthelmearc will use the website to share their work with the kingdom.”

Mistress Orianna continued, “Our monthly message will be there as well as information on A&S activities both around the Kingdom and in some of our neighboring Kingdoms. We are also hoping to start a regular focus on individual areas of study, so watch for those.”

The site was built by Lady Amalie Reinhardt and THLady Desiderata Drake, for which the Ministers of Arts and Sciences are very grateful.


Categories: SCA news sites

Rare Earl of Lancaster devotional panel found on Thames riverbank

History Blog - Tue, 2015-03-31 08:35

Archaeologists from the Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA) have unearthed a rare 14th century devotional panel dedicated to the death of rebel-turned-martyr Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster. The team was excavating the north bank of the Thames near London Bridge in advance of construction in 2000 when they found the rare piece in a medieval land reclamation dump. The waterlogged soil of the Thames riverbank is an outstanding preserver of artifacts, and this lead alloy panel with its delicate openwork has survived in excellent condition along with organic artifacts like timber revetments from the Roman period and the Middle Ages, the remains of plants used for cloth dyeing and a medieval leather knife sheath.

The panel was originally a mass-produced object sold at a pilgrimage site dedicated to the earl. People bought them as devotional objects, often for use in small home shrines. Thomas Plantagenet, Earl of Lancaster, would not at first glance seem to be the ideal subject for religious reverence. A holy man he was not. What he was was a powerful baron, the holder of no fewer than five major earldoms (Lancaster, Lincoln, Salisbury, Leicester, Derby) that made him the second wealthiest man in England after the king, the paternal grandson King Henry III of England and a thorn in the side of the unpopular King Edward II, his cousin.

At first Thomas supported Edward, but the bloom was soon off the rose, in large part thanks to Edward’s lavishing of titles, monies and power on his low-born favorite Piers Gaveston. By 1311, three years after he’d carried Curtana, the sword of St. Edward the Confessor, at his cousin’s coronation, Thomas was the leader of the Ordainers, a group of barons, earls and bishops demanding, among other things, that Gaveston be exiled. When Gaveston returned less than two months after this his third exile and Edward gave him all his lands and titles back, the Ordainers went to war. He was captured, tried and beheaded. Lancaster was one of the judges and Gaveston was executed on his property.

From then on it was one fight after the other between the royal cousins. For a while Lancaster had the upper hand in a big way, becoming the de facto king after Edward’s army was defeated by the forces of Robert the Bruce at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314, but in 1318 he was ousted and the two Hugh Despensers, father and son, took over as power behind the throne and Edward’s favorite. Lancaster marshalled his private army, struck up a deal with Robert the Bruce and rebelled against the crown.

On March 16th, 1322, Lancaster and the King’s allies went head to head at the Battle of Boroughbridge. Lancaster lost. He was taken prisoner and tried for treason in a sham court (the judges included both Despensers and the King) in his own castle at Pontefract where he was not allowed to speak in his own defense. He was convicted, of course, and on March 23rd, he was executed by beheading (Edward had commuted the traditional sentence of hanging, drawing and quartering on account of Lancaster’s royal blood).

Within weeks after Lancaster’s execution, shrines dedicated to him began to crop up, at the site of his execution at Pontefract Castle, his tomb in Pontefract Priory and at Old St. Paul’s Cathedral in London. Rumors of miracles at the priory tomb and execution site abounded and soon Thomas was venerated as a popular saint. He was so popular Edward II put an armed guard around the priory to keep the crowds away. In response money was raised from all over England to build a chantry chapel on the site of his execution.

His saintliness rested not in his personal piety or holy behavior (there certainly wasn’t much of the latter), but in his rebellion against a despised king. This was a thing in Medieval England: make saints out of fallen political/military heroes. Simon de Montfort received similar devotions after his death in 1265. What better way for Edward III to distance himself from his father after Edward II’s murder than to side with the cult of St. Thomas of Lancaster? In 1327 petitioned Pope John XXII that Thomas be canonized as an official saint of the Church, but it never happened.

Notwithstanding his lack of a Church-sanctioned halo, Thomas continued to be revered locally at least until the Dissolution of the Monasteries. His relics were believed to hold specific healing properties — his belt helped women in labour, his hat cured migraines — and a hymn called the Lancaster Suffrage was included as part of the daily prayers in the psalters and Books of Hours of wealthy Lancastrians. Here’s the one from Manuscript 13 (ca. 1330) in the Bridewell Library at Southern Methodist University:

Antiphon: Oh Thomas, Earl of Lancaster,
Jewel and flower of knighthood,
Who in the name of God,
For the sake of the state of England,
Offered yourself to be killed.
Versicle: Pray for us, soldier of Christ.
Response: Who never held the poor worthless.
Collect: Almighty everlasting God, you who wished to honor your holy soldier Thomas of Lancaster through the lamentable palm of the martyr for the peace and state of England just as he is lead through the sacrament for God’s own exceeding glory [and] through your holy miracles. Bestow, we pray, that you grant all faithful venerating him a good journey and life eternal. Through Christ our Lord, Amen.

For people who could not afford to have French illuminators make them their own personal prayer books, devotional panels provided a less expensive entre into the private veneration of St. Thomas. Although they were very popular in the 14th century, few of these panels have survived. The British Museum has two examples, one smaller and one larger, neither of them are in great condition. The figures on the smaller piece are crudely designed and while the larger panel has an elaborate Gothic cathedral-like structure and more people in it than the MOLA panel, they aren’t as finely crafted and the piece is fragmented. You can see in the picture that it’s being held together with wires.

The MOLA piece is five inches high and 3.5 inches wide and divided into four scenes that are to be read clockwise from the top left. In scene one, Thomas is captured. The caption in French reads “Here I am taken prisoner.” In scene two he is put on trial. The caption reads “I am judged.” In scene three he is convicted and conveyed by horse (the quality, or lack thereof, of this horse was a big issue in some of the chronicles) to the site of execution. The caption: “I am under threat.” In the last scene Thomas is beheaded by sword. The caption states simply: “la mort” (death). These shenanigans are presided over by Jesus Christ and the Virgin Mary, perched atop the sun and moon, waiting to welcome Lancaster’s saintly soul to heaven.

This is the only Lancaster devotional panel known to have French labels explaining each scene. It’s also the only one known with surviving gilding which highlights the sun and moon.

Up until now the panel has only been known by Museum of London experts, but the riverbank excavation, including detailed information about the panel, has just been published (Roman and Medieval Revetments on the Thames Waterfront) so the museum is putting the panel on display for the first time. The exhibition in the museum’s Medieval Galleries will run from March 28th to September 28th of this year.

Categories: Arts and Sciences, History