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Period or Not…Names

East Kingdom Gazette - Tue, 2014-05-20 14:16

This is a recurring series by Mistress Alys Mackyntoich on whether certain names currently can be documented to period based on existing evidence..  There are a lot of names that people think are medieval, but actually aren’t, and others which people think are modern, but in fact are found in the SCA’s period.  If you would like to suggest a name, send an email to the Gazette.

Today’s names are Shakespeare’s heroines.

The names of Shakespeare’s heroines are frequently requested as SCA names.  Many of these names are easily found in period Europe.

Beatrice is found in various spellings throughout Europe, including England, France and Italy, through the later parts of period. [1], [3]

Bianca is found as a female name in Italy.[2]

Celia likewise is a female Italian name.[3]

Cordelia is found in sixteenth and early seventeenth century England.[4]

Hero is found as a female given name in England, the Netherlands and Germany.[5]

Juliet is found in early seventeenth century England.[6]

Olivia is found in England and Italy.[2], [7]

Portia can be found as the name of real women in sixteenth century Italy.[2]

We very recently found evidence of Miranda as a female given name in Spain.[8]

We are still researching whether a number of other Shakespearean names are documentable.  As more and more period books and documents become generally available through digitization, we continue to uncover evidence for names we previously thought “undocumentable.”

[1] “English Names found in Brass Enscriptions” by Janell K. Lovelace (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/brasses/women.html)

[2]  “Names from Sixteenth Century Venice” by Julia Smith (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/16thcvenice.html).

[3] “Feminine Given Names from the Online Catasto of Florence of 1427″ by Josh Mittleman (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/catasto/)

[4] “Something Rich and Strange: “Undocumentable” Names >From The IGI Parish Records” by Alys Mackyntoich (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/SomethingRichandStrange.html).

[5]  “England Marriages, 1538–1973 ,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NJ9C-GYB), Hero Olde and Wilmott, 17 Jan 1603; citing Gwinear, Cornwall, England, Batch: M02571-3; “Netherlands, Marriages, 1565-1892,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FN7W-NTG : accessed 22 Apr 2014), Hero Cornelisz and Jannetje Alberts, 08 May 1611; citing Amsterdam, Noord-Holland, Netherlands, Batch: M01224-8

[6]  “England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/V5LP-V4L), Juliet Mordent, 15 Jul 1621; citing SAINT BOTOLPH BISHOPSGATE, LONDON, LONDON, ENGLAND, Batch: P00161-1

[7] “England Marriages, 1538–1973 ,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/V52F-1F9), Ricardus Howarde and Olivia Hille, 11 Jun 1587; citing High Ham, Somerset, England; Batch: M01936-2

[8] “España, defunciones, 1600-1920,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FNMS-RL8), Miranda Miguel, 10 Feb 1642; citing Murcia, Murcia, Spain; Batch:  B86284-3

 


Filed under: Heraldry Tagged: heraldry, names

Lilies War offers tour for non SCAdians

SCAtoday.net - Tue, 2014-05-20 12:24

Officials of Lilies War, which takes place June 13-22, 2014 at Smithville Lake in Clay County, Missouri, have announced that tours for the public will be available June 15, 2014.

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Categories: SCA news sites

"Threads" offers costumers a chance to design for 1/2 scale dress forms

SCAtoday.net - Tue, 2014-05-20 09:37

Threads Magazine has anncounced its 2014 American Sewing Expo (ASE) Challenge: 1/2-Scale Design Challenge on the theme of "Fashion Icons through the Ages." The contest is limited to 100 entries and garments must be finished by August 1, 2014.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Roman marching camp found in Thuringia

History Blog - Mon, 2014-05-19 23:12

A Roman marching camp from the 1st to 3rd century A.D. has been discovered near the town of Hachelbich in Thuringia. It’s the first Roman military camp found in the eastern German province and the first camp that is more than a day’s travel from the eastern border of the empire on the Rhine. In fact, it’s closer to the Elbe River than it is to the Rhine (the Elbe is about 150 miles east of the site, the Rhine 220 west), a strong indication that the Roman military did not completely withdraw to the Rhine even after three legions led by Publius Quintilius Varus were slaughtered by Germanic tribesmen at the Battle of Teutoburg Forest in 9 A.D.

The discovery of a large third century battlefield on Harzhorn hill in Lower Saxony in 2008 confirmed that there was a significant Roman military presence east of the Teutoburg Forest more than 200 years after Varus’ humiliating defeat. Archaeologists estimate about 1,000 Roman soldiers fought (and won) at Harzhorn. The Hachelbich marching camp is about 60 miles southeast of Harzhorn. It covers 18 hectares and was large enough to accommodate an entire legion of around 5,000 soldiers. As a marching camp, it wasn’t a permanent fortress, but rather a protective enclosure built by the legionaries in one evening so they could camp down in a defended position. They wouldn’t have spent more than a few days there while on their way elsewhere, in this case probably east towards the Elbe.

The site was found in 2010 during road work, but it was kept quiet while archaeologists explored the area. They excavated more than two hectares and covered another 10 hectares with magnetometers and aerial surveys. Now that the site has been identified as a military camp, the Thuringian State Office for Heritage and Archaeology has announced the find. They’re keeping the exact location a secret, however, to keep looters from ravaging the place on the hunt for portable Roman artifacts.

A rough rectangle with round corners, the camp is standard Roman military issue. No matter where they were, legions on the move set up a minifortress in the wilderness at the end of each day’s march. At Hachelbich, the meter-deep trenches dug around the camp were the easiest feature to spot in the soil. Two perimeter trenches have been found, each more than 400 meters long.

On the camp’s northern edge, the soldiers built a gate protected by another trench that projected out past the perimeter. “It’s typically Roman—no Germans did that sort of thing,” Kuessner says. The trenches were part of a simple, but effective makeshift perimeter defense: A low wall of dirt was thrown up behind the trench, then topped with tall stakes, to create a defensive barrier almost 3 meters wide and 3 meters high. Erosion wiped away the wall long ago, but it left discolorations in the soil where the trench was dug.

Archaeologists also unearthed the remains of eight bread ovens close to the camp perimeter, which shows an impressive commitment to quality food considering the legionaries weren’t going to be there for long. Some artifacts confirming the military nature of the camp were found: four hobnails from the soles of Roman caligae, fittings from a sword scabbard and horse tackle.

The style of the artifacts places the camp in the first two centuries of the first millennium and radiocarbon dating supports the range, but archaeologists haven’t found anything to narrow it down any further or link to the camp to the reign of a certain emperor. Excavations will continue this year and the next at least. After the crops in the valley are harvested this fall, archaeologists will be able to excavate the farmland. They hope to find coins that will provide a precise date, or an artifact with the legion number on it that would write a new chapter in Roman military history.

Categories: Arts and Sciences, History

Teller talks Tempest

SCAtoday.net - Mon, 2014-05-19 20:03

In celebration of William Shakespeare's 450th birthday, magician Teller (the quiet one), recently co-directed a new version of the Bard's magicial play, The Tempest. In a video, Teller discusses the production with Mark Mobley for a segment of NPR's The Record.

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Categories: SCA news sites

“Quivers and Quarrels” Looking for New Editor

East Kingdom Gazette - Mon, 2014-05-19 17:35

Alec Craig, arrows and forks

TheGazette has received the following request for a volunteer:

 As you may or may not know the Archery Community has a quarterly newsletter called “Quivers and Quarrels.”  We have had a wonderful editor/Chronicler working on it but she  needs an immediate replacement.

Are there any Archery enthusiasts you know who would flourish in this kind of role? The Q&Q Chronicler serves as a deputy to me and has a host of people supplying material for their newsletter.

If you know anyone who might be interested, please have them contact me at pubmanager@sca.org.  I will gladly answer any questions they may have about the job.  This might also be a good training ground for future Kingdom Chroniclers.

Please spread the word.

Thanks,
Honor
_______________________________________________
KChron mailing list
KChron@lists.sca.org
http://lists.sca.org/listinfo/kchron


Filed under: Archery, Uncategorized Tagged: archery, volunteers

Open position for the Society

SCAtoday.net - Mon, 2014-05-19 13:35

Leslie Vaughn, President of the Society for Creative Anachronism, Inc., has announced that Board of Directors is seeking applicants for the position of Society Seneschal and Vice President of Operations.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Mummified fetus found in Egyptian sarcophagus

History Blog - Sun, 2014-05-18 23:28

CT scans have revealed that a small cartonnage sarcophagus in the Wellcome collection at Swansea University’s Egypt Centre contains the mummified remains of a three to four-month-old fetus.

The sarcophagus is just over 20 inches long and painted in the style of the 26th Dynasty (ca. 600 B.C.), with a yellow and blue wig, wide collar, and brick red face. The body features crossing diagonal lines that form diamond shapes with a cream vertical band from collar to feet and two horizontal bands intersecting it. On the bands are painted hieroglyphics that don’t make any sense. Because of this, there have been some questions its authenticity but it’s not unheard of for genuine sarcophagus from this period to have gibberish hieroglyphics. Pioneering Egyptologist Sir William Matthew Flinders Petrie posited that the painters of mock hieroglyphics may have been illiterate and included the nonsense words because the presence of hieroglyphics was important for the voyage to the afterlife. The provenance of the piece can’t help because all we know about it is that it entered the collection in 1971.

In 1998, Singleton Hospital X-rayed the sarcophagus and found traces of what could be a small skull, but nothing conclusive. On April 28th of this year, Swansea Univerity’s Clinical Imaging College of Medicine CT scanned the sarcophagus which revealed far more details about what’s inside. The bulk of the space is filled with folded textile, likely linen bandages.

Within those folded strips of material, the CT scan showed a darker area about 3 inches long which researchers identified as a fetus in fetal position and with a placental sac. What could be the fetus’s femur was also identified.

“The length of the femur together with the size of the dark patch is consistent with that of a 12 to 16-week-old fetus,” Graves-Brown said.

“Another dark patch suggests the presence of an amulet and there are several areas with dark circles resembling strings of beads or tassels,” she added.

Strings of beads are fairly common in mummy wrappings from the 26th Dynasty.

The CT scan could not determine the gender of the fetus. The iconography of the sarcophagus suggests he was a boy. The striped wig was typically used on the sarcophaguses of men (although women were known to sport them as well) and the russet face paint is characteristic of male burials.

Fetus coffins are rare but not unheard of. There were two fetuses found in Tutankhamun’s tomb, and a whole section of the Eastern cemetery in Deir el-Medina was dedicated to the burial of children, fetuses and placentas. Egyptians believed the placenta was a twin of the self, so when a fetus or stillbirth was buried, the placenta was buried too.

Categories: Arts and Sciences, History

Medieval archway found under Cardigan Castle floor

SCAtoday.net - Sun, 2014-05-18 17:13

NPS Archaeology, working on an 18-month excavation at Wales' Cardigan Castle, has unearthed a stone archway dating to the 12th century beneath the floor of the castle. The archway is believed to have led to the tower of the original castle.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Accidental Medieval Siberian Mummies Discovered

SCAtoday.net - Sun, 2014-05-18 12:50

Just 29 km from the Arctic Circle, near Zeleniy Yar in Siberia, a group of bodies dating back to the Middle Ages have been found in shallow graves.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Met releases 400,000 high res images

History Blog - Sat, 2014-05-17 23:04

It seems the Met is feeling generous these days, not just in enhancing its collection but also in sharing it. As part of its new Open Access for Scholarly Content program, the museum is releasing 400,000 high resolution images that can be downloaded directly from its website and used for scholarly purposes without asking for permission or paying a fee.

In making the announcement, [Thomas Campbell, Director and CEO of the Metropolitan Museum of Art] said: “Through this new, open-access policy, we join a growing number of museums that provide free access to images of art in the public domain. I am delighted that digital technology can open the doors to this trove of images from our encyclopedic collection.”

OASC was developed as a resource for students, educators, researchers, curators, academic publishers, non-commercial documentary filmmakers, and others involved in scholarly or cultural work. Prior to the establishment of OASC, the Metropolitan Museum provided images upon request, for a fee, and authorization was subject to terms and conditions.

To access the images, click on the collection database and either search by keyword, browse the featured artists/topics or browse by material, geographic location, era or departments. For getting lost in beautiful things, I’m partial to browsing by era and culture. Look for the OASC in a little box underneath the picture the left of the My Met link. To download the image, click on the down arrow to the right and save the image to your hard drive in the usual way. They also seem to allow hotlinking but that’s rude and unreliable in the long term so I wouldn’t do that.

Apparently some images that are still under copyright or whose status is unclear are not yet available for free use, but I haven’t encountered any in my browsing thus far. If the photograph is not free for use, it will not have the OASC icon underneath them
The museum will be increasing the number of available photographs as copyrights expire and new digital files are uploaded.

On a tangentially related (at best) note, while enjoying a random browse today I came across this arresting bronze of Roman emperor Trebonianus Gallus (reigned 251–253 A.D.). Almost the entire statue is original, a very rare survival of a complete third century freestanding bronze. Is that tiny head on that large body not the weirdest thing? And that’s an idealized portrayal, or at least the body is. He’s posed like a famous statue of Alexander the Great carved by Lysippos that inspired many a fine figure for centuries. The face, on the other hand, appears to be realistic which makes for an eye-catchingly disproportionate combination. Still, there’s no question the head and body are of a piece. The museum X-rayed the statue and found the head is original to that body.

Categories: Arts and Sciences, History

Seeking Howe's

SCAtoday.net - Sat, 2014-05-17 18:32

600 years ago, Howe's was a satellite community of Cambridge, England. Then it disappeared off the map. Now archaeologists have begun investigating Howe's, along with three other villages, that ringed the medieval university town.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Crown Tournament Results

East Kingdom Gazette - Sat, 2014-05-17 16:22

Vivat Prince Edward !

Vivat Princess Þóra !

Vivant the Kingdom of the East!

The Gazette is especially grateful to Mistress Alys Mackyntoich for her diligent reporting from the fieid today.


Filed under: Events, Tidings Tagged: Crown Tournament, Crown Tourney

Crown Tournament Finals – Fifth Bout

East Kingdom Gazette - Sat, 2014-05-17 16:22

The fifth and final bout of the Spring Crown Tournament was fought with sword & shield.

Victor: Duke Edward Grey of Lochleven


Filed under: Events, Heavy List, Tidings Tagged: Crown Tournament, Crown Tourney

Crown Tournament Finals – Fourth Bout

East Kingdom Gazette - Sat, 2014-05-17 16:12

The fourth bout of the finals was fought with two swords.

Victor: Duke Edward Grey of Lochleven


Filed under: Events, Heavy List, Tidings Tagged: Crown Tournament, Crown Tourney

Crown Tournament Finals – Third Bout

East Kingdom Gazette - Sat, 2014-05-17 16:09

The third bout of the finals was fought with axes.

Victor: Sir Thomas of Ravenhill


Filed under: Events, Heavy List, Tidings Tagged: Crown Tournament, Crown Tourney

Crown Tournament Finals – Second Bout

East Kingdom Gazette - Sat, 2014-05-17 16:04

The second bout of the finals was fought with great sword.

Victor: Duke Edward Grey of Lochleven

 


Filed under: Events, Heavy List, Tidings Tagged: Crown Tournament, Crown Tourney

Latest techniques used to help conserve ancient bridges

SCAtoday.net - Sat, 2014-05-17 16:00

Researchers from the Applied Geotechnology Group at the University of Vigo in Spain are using the latest technology to study 80 Roman and medieval bridges to determine the original construction of the bridges and the best ways to conserve them.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Crown Tournament Finals – First Bout

East Kingdom Gazette - Sat, 2014-05-17 15:59

The first bout of the finals was fought with sword & shield.

Victor: Sir Thomas of Ravenhill


Filed under: Events, Heavy List, Tidings Tagged: Crown Tournament, Crown Tourney

Crown Tourney – Second Finalist

East Kingdom Gazette - Sat, 2014-05-17 15:41

The Gazette is pleased to report that Sir Thomas of Ravenhill has advanced to the finals of the Spring Tournament for the Crown of the East. He will face Duke Edward Grey of Lochleven,

 


Filed under: Events, Heavy List, Tidings Tagged: Crown Tournament, Crown Tourney