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Extraordinary finds at "Pompeii of the north"

SCAtoday.net - Sat, 2014-10-11 15:23

Archaeologists marvel at discoveries from the Binchester Roman Fort near Bishop Auckland in northern England, a 2nd century site which has been dubbed the "Pompei of the north." (photos)

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Categories: SCA news sites

Job Opening – Compleat Anachronist Editor

East Kingdom Gazette - Sat, 2014-10-11 12:22

The Society for Creative Anachronism Inc. is accepting applications for the position of Editor for The Compleat Anachronist.

The Compleat Anachronist is a journal published four times a year. Each issue is approximately 60 pages long and focuses on a single topic relevant to the time period 600 C.E. to 1600 C.E. The single-topic format gives readers an opportunity to review a subject in much more detail than Tournaments Illuminated, a Kingdom Arts and Sciences publication, or a local newsletter can provide.

The Editor is responsible for oversight of all aspects of issue production, including recruiting authors and reviewers, manuscript development, as well as submitting quarterly reports to the Board of Directors and the Publications Manager. A team approach to issue production is encouraged to assist in effective and timely management of the publication. The Editor may recruit a support staff, including assistant editors, graphic artists, and other assistants. The Editor needs to either be, or have on staff, a graphic artist with access to and experience with a computer running Quark or InDesign and the ability to export files to high resolution pdf format. Contributing authors are generally responsible for providing their own illustrations, photographs or other artwork, but it is helpful for the Editor to develop a pool of artists to assist authors if needed.

Qualifications for the position include excellent written and oral communication skills, leadership skills, the ability to prioritize tasks and meet deadlines, and strong computer skills. Professional experience in editing, design, art direction or desktop publishing and prior experience in an SCA chronicler position are desirable, but not required. The position requires approximately 20 to 35 hours per month (this includes recruiting authors, screening manuscripts, proofreading, layout, correspondence, and online reviewing). The deadlines to get the finished layout to the printer are 15 December, 15 March, 15 June, and 15 September. The issues are mailed quarterly in January, April, July, and October. Reasonable expenses are covered by the Corporation and may include: paper, printer cartridges, stamps, and a post office box. You will be asked to submit an expense report, with receipts attached, to receive reimbursement. The Editor also receives a small stipend from SCA once an issue is completed.

Hard copies of résumés (both professional and within the Society, including offices held and awards received) must be sent to: SCA Inc. Attn: CA Editor Position P.O. Box 360789 Milpitas, CA 95036-0789 Electronic copies may also be sent to resumes at sca.org. Résumés must be received by January 31st, 2015. Questions regarding the position may be directed to Gloria Woodard, Publications Manager via telephone at 804-243-6874, or via email at pubmanager at sca.org. Leslie Vaughn, President Society for Creative Anachronism, Inc. president at sca.org. 602-758-0079
Comments are strongly encouraged and can be sent to:
SCA Inc.
Box 360789
Milpitas,  CA 95036

You may also email comments@lists.sca.org.

This announcement is an official informational release by the Society for Creative Anachronism , Inc.  Permission is granted to reproduce this announcement in its entirety in newsletters, websites and electronic mailing lists.


Filed under: Corporate Tagged: Complete Anachronist, job opening

Louvre crowdfunds to buy gorgeous Teschen Table

History Blog - Fri, 2014-10-10 23:31

It’s a cultural institution throwing a bake sale to secure a national treasure again, this time the Louvre museum in Paris which needs the funding power of the crowd to purchase the Teschen Table, a masterpiece of 18th century goldsmithing, mineralogy and furniture-making that has an illustrious political history to boot. The table is priced at 12.5 million Euros, most of which the Louvre has already raised. The last remaining million ($1.67 million) they hope to raise in donations by January 31st, 2015.

The table was made in 1779 by Johann-Christian Neuber, a goldsmith, jeweler and lapidary at the Dresden court of Frederick Augustus III, Elector of Saxony. Neuber became known for his gold snuff boxes inlaid with hardstones and gemstones. He called them Steinkabinettabatiere (stone cabinet snuffbox) because they were like miniature cabinets of curiosities. Neuber would number every stone and include a booklet with the numbered list identifying each mineral and where it was mined. His work combined the high craftsmanship of the goldsmith with the scientific approach of the geologist, and it was highly sought after by scholars and collectors alike. They weren’t easy to get as Neuber’s pieces weren’t for retail; they were usually given as gifts by the Elector of Saxony.

In 1778, Frederick Augustus became embroiled in the War of the Bavarian Succession. Maximilian III Joseph, Prince-Elector of Bavaria, died childless of smallpox in 1777. A number of high-powered candidates vied to claim his title, among them Charles Theodore of Sulzbach, Prince-Elector and Count Palatine, who was the direct heir, Empress Maria Theresa of Austria, her son and co-ruler Holy Roman Emperor Joseph II, King Frederick II of Prussia and the Elector of Saxony. Negotiations between interested parties proposed various partitions, but nobody could agree on how to slice the Bavarian cake and in July of 1778, Austria and Prussia went to war.

The conflict almost immediately settled into a stalemate. Maria Theresa, who was intimately familiar with how messy wars of succession could be, got Frederick of Prussia and her reluctant son to engage in peace talks brokered by Russia and France. France sent its Ambassador to Vienna, the Baron de Breteuil, to the Austrian Silesian town of Teschen, strategically located between Austria and Prussia, to negotiate a treaty in March of 1779. On May 13th, 1779, the belligerent parties signed the Treaty of Teschen. Charles Theodore would inherit Bavaria, but it and the Palatinate would combine to give him just the one vote in the election of the Holy Roman Emperor, and he would have to cede some territory to Austria. Austria had to recognize Prussia’s claim to the margraviates of Ansbach and Bayreuth. The Elector of Saxony got a sweet payoff of six million guilders.

With six million extra guilders jingling in his pocket, Frederick Augustus was in a generous mood after Teschen. He gave the Russian representative, Prince Nikolai Wasilyevich Repnin, a Meissen porcelain service composed of hundreds of pieces and a large allegorical centerpiece (now lost) with bases made by Neuber. The Baron de Breteuil got Neuber’s masterpiece: a table made in the style of his snuffboxes only far grander, with miles of gilded bronze, stone insets 10 times larger than on the boxes and far more of them. On the tabletop there are 128 stones — including agate, amethyst, onyx, opal, topaz, sardonyx, jasper, petrified wood — all from Saxony. Five Meissen porcelain medallions bearing allegories of peace and art painted in grisaille by Johann Eleazar Zeissig (also known as Schenau), are placed in the center and cardinal points.

As he did with his snuffboxes, Neuber numbered each stone and created a booklet identifying the type and find site of every number. The numbering begins in the center of the table with the small round gemstones then continues clockwise in concentric circles. You can hover over the tabletop insets on this page to see what kind of stones they are and where they came from.

The hovertext can’t possibly do the booklet justice, however. For this very special assignment, Neuber commissioned Dresden artist and engraver Carl Gottfried Nestler to write every entry in the booklet in a hand so beautiful, so clean, so regular that if you didn’t know it was handwritten you wouldn’t believe it. Someone needs to make a Nestler font because that handwriting deserves to be immortalized.

The table became famous in its own time. Historians wrote about it as early as 1782, and it even made a cameo in volume one of Marcel Proust’s Remembrance Of Things Past as a prized piece belonging to the Princesse d’Iéna. In the Swann In Love section, the terribly fashionable Princesse de Laumes laments that her husband wants her to visit the Princesse d’Iéna whom she does not know. She and General de Froberville have this exchange:

“But I must tell you what he’s told me about their house; it’s quite enough. Can you imagine it, all their furniture is ‘Empire’!”
“But, my dear Princess, that’s only natural; it belonged to their grandparents.”
“I don’t quite say it didn’t, but that doesn’t make it any less ugly. I quite understand that people can’t always have nice things, but at least they needn’t have things that are merely grotesque. What do you say? I can think of nothing more devastating, more utterly smug than that hideous style—cabinets covered all over with swans’ heads, like bath-taps!”
“But I believe, all the same, that they’ve got some lovely things; why, they must have that famous mosaic table on which the Treaty of…”
“Oh, I don’t deny, they may have things that are interesting enough from the historic point of view. But things like that can’t, ever, be beautiful … because they’re simply horrible! I’ve got things like that myself, that came to Basin from the Montesquious. Only, they’re up in the attics at Guermantes, where nobody ever sees them.

The Breteuil family did not hide it in the attic. It’s been at the Château de Breteuil about 25 miles southwest of Paris since 1821, leaving only on rare occasions on loan to museums for special exhibitions. In 2010, the family decided to sell the table to raise money to maintain the château and deal with some inheritance issues. They had a foreign buyer lined up and applied to the government for an export license. To block its export, the Teschen Table was declared National Treasure, but the block would expire in 30 months (March 31st, 2013) if the state did not acquire the piece.

In July of last year, the Teschen Table was declared “a work of major patrimonial interest” which granted it another reprieve while funds were raised. The Louvre managed to scrape almost the entire value from its acquisition budget and corporate donors, but needs the aid of the public to reach the final goal. You can donate online here.

Categories: Arts and Sciences, History

St. Eligius

East Kingdom Gazette - Fri, 2014-10-10 17:14

The Barony of Dragonship Haven once again welcomes the artisans and scientists of the Kingdom to their annual St. Elegius Arts and Sciences Faire and Competition on November 15th in Meriden CT.  In addition to the arts & sciences competition, the day will include several martial activities, the Master Alexander Challenge, a hearty day board, and a dessert revel to celebrate the Barony of Dragonship Haven’s Birthday.

St. Eligius Arts and Sciences Competition

Viking embroidered blouse as exhibited in the AS 48 St. Elegius competition

The St. Eligius Arts and Sciences Competition is designed to be something like a martial tourney divided into different levels of competition based on the competitor’s skill level, and judged in a face-to-face style that is allegorical of armored combat. 

Competition levels

Each contestant declares his or her entry as belonging to one of the following levels. Entrants are allowed to choose the correct level for each entry and to enter different items at different levels. 

Novices have entered a few small competitions (or none) and feel rather inexperienced in Art and Science contests. (Analogy: Novice Tourney) Entries will further be divided into ‘New to A&S Contests’ and ‘New to the SCA’ (>3 years) at the registration table.

Artisans have entered competitions and have gotten feedback & refined their entry so it shows to best advantage. (Analogy: Cadet’s/Squire’s Tourney)

Experienced competitors have entered several local or Kingdom-wide contests. This group also includes any Laurel whose entry is anything-BUT-what-they-were-laureled-for. (Analogy: competes in King & Queen’s Champion Tourney)

Laurels & masters are either members of the Order of the Laurel entering examples of the work(s) for which they received their recognition, or any non-Laurel who chooses to enter in this group, thus they are scored on their their mastery of an art or science. (Analogy: competes in Best of the Knowne World Tourney)

Competition Rules
  1. Face-to-face scoring is the order of the day so come prepared to talk about your work. We contend that A&S contest is a form of tourney, so it’s an in-person sport. You must be present to score & be scored.
  2. Since the combatants declare the winner of a martial bout, St. Eligius entrants will score entries in their contest group: novices scoring novice entries, artisans scoring artisan entries; Laurels scoring Laurels & masters entries etc. An orientation to scoring will be available for every entrant and a consultant will be available for each group. Use them for info, but make up your own mind.
  3. Not all entries from the same person must be entered at the same level. Please limit entries to not more than 3 in a level, or 5 total. (Note: a Laurel is never a novice or an artisan, but may properly enter as Experienced Competitor for new artforms and/or as Laurel/master entering something for which they received their Laurel.)
  4. Performance entries should NOT be longer than 5 minutes for solos, or up to 10 minutes for groups.
  5. Research papers are limited to 8 pages and must be received in electronic format by the competition coordinator 2 weeks before competition (Nov 3rd). They will be read by non-contestants, but face-to-face scoring will still occur.
  6. All food, beverage, and cosmetic entries must have a full ingredients list to avoid foreseeable allergies.
  7. Works too bulky to transport may be entered using photographs and write-ups. Works-in-progress are welcome.
  8. There is no age limit on entries. Bring your best even if you made it 20+ years ago.
  9. A St. Eligius 12 Question sheet should accompany entries in this contest (strongly recommended). It is OK to say “see documentation”; and provide a more formal write-up. Any pictures of related items or extant examples should be included to help those scoring your work. Your documentation from prior competitions/displays can be included for completeness. Sources should be generally regarded as reputable and applicable to the entry.
  10. Use of smart phones or computers to show images or references or is permitted but not required. No equipment will be supplied, but you may share or borrow. NO internet access is available.

Glass beads made in a charcoal kiln as exhibited in last year’s St. Elegius competition.

Prizes will be awarded during court to the gentles achieving the highest single-entry score in each of the 5 groups: Novice 1 and Novice 2, Artisan, Experienced competitor, Laurels & masters.

Special competitions also being held concurrently.

St. Eligius 12 question sheet is NOT needed for these competitions.
Scoring is subjective on a 0 to 100 scale as shown on score sheet.

Medieval Moment

In honor of our patron, St. Eligius, we are asking that entries include a brief description of your experience of a Medieval Moment during the preparation of your project. Please describe (verbally or in writing) something that brought you closer to the artisan who originated the work you have adapted or used for inspiration. Descriptions may be written or verbal. A good story always scores well. See question # 11 in St. Eligius 12 Questions.

Master Alexander Challenge

In the spirit of Master Alexander the Younger, please enter an example of your work in an art that is new to you within the last year. New techniques within the art that you already practice do not count (i.e. glassblowing to enameling of blown glass beakers is an expansion of a skill, not a new-to-you art form.) Scoring will be only on the entry’s meeting the criteria of the art being new to you, and not on full documentation or mastery of the art. Minimal documentation of methods and how this is new to you is required. The intent is to give a supportive venue for trying new arts without the rigors of open competition. The prize is will be chosen and presented by Lady Cassandra de Matisse or her representative.

Artisan’s Progress

Display 3-5 examples of your work showing how your skill has progressed over the years. Works should include something from very early in your career (even if that was last week). Works may (but need not) be entered for individual scores. This competition is a chance to show your development as an artisan. Documentation should be very brief with rough dates of completion.

SCA Kluge:

Bring your best non-period items with a medieval flair (e.g. camp furniture, phone holder, lawn ornament) for recognition in this category.

Populace Choice:

Vote with beans for your favorite entry. Most beans wins.

Baron’s Choice:

Catch the Baron’s eye and gain his praise and a prize.

Beyond the Arts and Sciences Competition

Those artists and scientists who prefer not to be involved in scoring and being scored are warmly encouraged to DISPLAY their works for the delight and amazement of the populace. Please consider showing your works and let us see what you’re up to! Works-in-progress are welcome.

Those with a more martial inclination are well-provided with activities during the day as well.  List fields for both armored and rapier combat will be available and the Barony of Dragonship Haven will be holding tournaments to choose their new Champions in both disciplines.


Filed under: Events Tagged: Arts and Sciences, champions, Dragonship Haven, events

Long lost Salisbury Hall discovered beneath former stadium car park

SCAtoday.net - Fri, 2014-10-10 16:15

In 1322, the Salisbury Manor was built in Walthamstow, a suburb of London. The manor burned in the 16th century and was replaced by a Tudor structure, but was also lost. Now a team of archaeologists from Archaeology South East have found Salisbury Manor  beneath a former car park for Walthamstow Stadium.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Company of the Dove has "Breakfast with Jacquie Mackay"

SCAtoday.net - Fri, 2014-10-10 11:47

During a recent interview, Jacquie Mackay of 612 ABC Brisbaine (Australia) spoke with Jen Dunn of the Living History reenactment group Company of the Dove. A podcast of the interview is available on the website.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Agincourt 2014 photos online

SCAtoday.net - Fri, 2014-10-10 09:25

Master Caelin on Andrede reports that he has created an album of photos from Agincourt 2014 which took place recently in the Kingdom of Ansteorra. The photos are available to view on Flickr.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Period or Not…Names

East Kingdom Gazette - Fri, 2014-10-10 09:00

This is a recurring series by Mistress Alys Mackyntoich on whether certain names currently can be documented to period based on existing evidence..  There are a lot of names that people think are medieval, but actually aren’t, and others which people think are modern, but in fact are found in the SCA’s period.  If you would like to suggest a name, send an email to the Gazette.

Today’s name is Liam.

Liam has long been a problem name for the heralds.  Many people assume
it is medieval, but in fact we have no evidence of its being used as a
given name in the medieval or Renaissance era.  Nor has there been any
evidence of its being a period nickname for “William.”  The closest
thing to Liam we have found so far in an Irish context is a woman
named Joan nyne Lyeme (in other words, Joan daughter of Lyeme) in an
Anglicized Irish record from the era of Elizabeth I.[1]

However, for people determined to have the name Liam (such as certain
Peers of my long acquaintance), we have found a way to make it
registerable.  As I have discussed a few times in these articles,
there is an established a pattern of using late 16th century English
surnames as given names.[2]  The most well-known example of this is
Guildford Dudley, the husband of Lady Jane Grey, whose first name was
based on a family surname.

We do have evidence of a woman with the surname Liam who was married
in Cambridge, England in 1592.[3]  Because the pattern of using 16th
century English surnames as given names actually existed in period,
evidence of Liam as an English surname permits registration of Liam as
an English given name.  As it is considered an English name, it can be
used with an Irish or Scottish surname.

[1]  The Fourteenth Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records
in Ireland (https://archive.org/details/reportofdeputyke1416irel),
entry 4539.

[2]  September 2012 Cover Letter
(http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2012/09/12-09cl.html)

[3]  Joana Liam; Female; Marriage; 1592; Elsworth, Cambridge, England;
Batch: M13053-1 ((https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NJ1W-6MF).


Filed under: Heraldry

Bronze Age palace, burials unearthed in Spain

History Blog - Thu, 2014-10-09 23:23

A team from the Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB) excavating the Bronze Age archaeological site on the La Almoloya plateau in the southeastern Spanish municipality of Pliego have unearthed residential and government buildings and 50 tombs. The plateau’s steep slopes made it a highly defensible location that was occupied from 2,200 B.C. to 1,550 B.C. by the El Argar culture. The extensive construction and dense population point to La Almoloya having been an important political center 70 miles northeast of the Argaric capital of El Argar (modern-day Antas, Almeria).

Artifacts found inside the buildings were in excellent condition. Metals, ceramics, stone and bone survived alongside exceptionally rare textiles. The structures and their contents paint a picture of a rich urban environment that is unique in Bronze Age continental Europe.

The excavations indicate that the La Almoloya plateau, of 3,800 metres square, was densely populated and included several residential complexes of some 300 square metres, with eight to twelve rooms in each residence. The buildings’ walls were constructed with stones and argamasa [a kind of lime mortar], and covered with layers of mortar. Some parts contain stucco decorated with geometric and naturalistic motifs, a novelty which represents the discovery of an Argaric artistic style.

Among the discoveries made is a wide hall with high ceilings measuring some 70 square metres, with capacity for 64 people seated on the benches lining the walls. The hall includes a ceremonial fireplace and a podium of symbolic character. This unique building was used for political purposes and archaeologists consider that it must have been used to celebrate hearings or government meetings.

Archaeologists affirm that this is the first time a building specifically dedicated to governing purposes has been discovered in Western Europe, and believe that decisions were taken here which affected many of the region’s other communities.

The ceremonial hall is flanked by adjoining rooms. Because of its political significance and large size, archaeologists categorize this structure as a palace, and a highly advanced one at that, comparable only to near Eastern buildings from this era.

Another reason to deem the building a royal palace is a tomb that was found adjacent to the main wall of the government hall. It holds the skeletal remains of an adult man and woman who were buried with 30 artifacts made of precious metals and gemstones. The woman wore a silver diadem around her head, one of only five Agaric diadems ever discovered and none of the other four remain in Spain. They were found at the El Argar type site by Belgian mine engineers Henri and Louis Siret in the 1880s and are now in the permanent collection of the Royal Museums of Art and History’s Cinquantenaire Museum in Brussels.

The royal couple were also buried with four ear dilators, two of gold, two of silver, plus silver rings, earrings and bracelets. A bronze dagger had silver nails in the handle. These are rare and important examples of the advanced metallurgy of the El Argar culture. Two other pieces are uniquely significant on that score: a ceramic vessel with bands of finely layered silver and a punch with a bronze tip and a silver handle. Both of them are one of a kind objects that demonstrate the high level of Argaric silver craftsmanship.

Categories: Arts and Sciences, History

Abandoned school becomes Richard III grave visitor center

SCAtoday.net - Thu, 2014-10-09 17:35

Leicester, England mayor Peter Soulsby was on hand recently to celebrate the opening of a UK£4 million visitor center near the site of the grave of Richard III, discovered in 2012 in a city car park. The center is housed in an abandoned school building.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Laurels' Prize Tourney 2014 photos online

SCAtoday.net - Thu, 2014-10-09 13:17

Lady Helene von Braunschweyg reports that she has created an album of photos from Laurels Prize Tourney, which took place September 13, 2014 in the Kingdom of Ansteorra. The photos are available to view on Flickr.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Ansteorra lauded for volunteer hours at Gulf Wars

SCAtoday.net - Thu, 2014-10-09 10:02

Gulf Wars Exchequer, Baroness Genevieve McCullum de Caen, reports that the Kingdom of Ansteorra totaled over 4700 hours of volunteer time at the 2014 Gulf Wars. She lists the hours for the top five groups.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Head of goddess found at Arbeia Roman fort

History Blog - Wed, 2014-10-08 23:46

A volunteer with WallQuest, a community archaeology project excavating Arbeia Roman fort in South Shields at the easternmost end of Hadrian’s Wall has discovered a carved stone head of a goddess. The small figure is just over three inches high and is finely carved. She wears a mural crown — a crown in the shape of battlements — that identifies her as a protective goddess. Archaeologists believe she is a representation of Brigantia, the goddess of the northern British tribe of the Brigantes. Indeed, an altar inscribed “Deae Brigantiae sacrum Congenncus (V[otum] S[olvit] L[ibens] M[erito]” (To the sacred goddess Brigantia Congenncus willingly and deservedly fulfilled his vow) was unearthed 100 yards from the head in 1895, and at least one other statue of Brigantia wearing a mural crown has been found.

The find is a small, finely carved female head which is believed to date back to the second century AD and stands at 8cm high. Every part is delicately carved including eyes, nose, mouth and hairstyle with traces of pink paint on the statues face as well as a bit of red on her lips.

The head dates to the 2nd century A.D., early in the life of the fort which was first built overlooking the River Tyne around 160 A.D. and enlarged in 208 A.D. to serve as a maritime supply base the soldiers along Hadrian’s Wall. We know the stone goddess predates that expansion because it was found in an aqueduct channel that was filled so new construction could be done on top of it. The statue of the goddess wouldn’t have been freestanding on its own; given the discovery of her head and the altar found in the 19th century, it’s likely that there was a shrine to Brigantia in Arbeia that was demolished to make room for the enlargement of the fort.

Troop divisions at Arbeia that have been identified thus far include boatmen from the Tigris River in what was then Persia, now Iraq, Gaulish infantry, Spanish cavalry (First Asturian) and Syrian archers. Although locals probably enlisted later on, when the statue was standing, it was these units from all over the empire who were likely responsible for creating the shrine to the local goddess.

Nick Hodgson, WallQuest Project Manager, said:

“The head is a truly wonderful find. Northern Britain was a dangerous place for the Roman army in the second century AD; if the goddess is Brigantia it shows how keen the Romans were to placate the spirits of the region.”

It must have worked, because Arbeia and the civilian settlement that grew in its shadow remained in active use for decades after most of the other fort settlements on Hadrian’s Wall were abandoned or greatly contracted. There was new construction in the Arbeia settlement in the late 3rd century or early 4th. This is attributable to its commercial importance as a maritime fort and market center. The only permanent masonry granaries ever found in Britain were built in Arbeia. The fort and settlement were in use through the end of the Roman occupation in the 5th century.

The head of Brigantia will be conserved over the next few months. In Spring of 2015, it will go on display at the Arbeia Roman Fort & Museum. At the same time the community excavation project at Arbeia will begin again, and volunteers will have the opportunity to look for the rest of the statue.

Categories: Arts and Sciences, History

No Pineapples in the Queen’s Presence!

East Kingdom Gazette - Wed, 2014-10-08 21:57

Presentation of Dispatched Pineapples

All know our good Queen Thyra’s skill with the bow, and that She is ever eager to test Her mettle at the butts. So it was that at the most recent Pennsic War, while She was yet Princess of our fair realm, She and Her retinue processed to the archery range for the Saint Sebastian’s Shoot, to enjoy a fine day of shooting and good fellowship.

Pineapples, in their only appropriate condition

One of the challenges that day required archers to score hits on several small targets — pineapples, as it happens — before attempting to hit a further higher-scoring target — a boar. Her Highness easily vanquished the first three small targets, but the fourth was crafty and mocked Her by moving out of the way of each arrow she sent toward it. In frustration, Her Highness declared “That pineapple is banished!” A trusted retainer quietly advised Her that She did not yet possess the authority of banishment, but that She soon would.

Thus it was that one of Her first acts after being Crowned was to ban pineapples from Her presence. Herewith follows the text of Her proclamation:

By Thyra the Queen.  Having considered that the peace of our realm is greatly disrupted by the predations of the dread, awful and terrible creature known as the piña de Indes, called by some the “pine-apple,” lately brought from the New World to our shores by agents of Spain for nefarious purposes, and our own Royal Person having been greatly and foully troubled and harassed by the same upon the archery range at the Pennsic, and wishing to restore and bring our realm to justice, tranquility and peace, We do therefore condemn and perpetually exile from this our Eastern Realm all such piña de Indes now dwelling herein.  Should any such piña de Indes be hereafter found within the lands where our will holds the power of law, their goods shall be escheat to the Crown, and they shall be put in the Crown’s irons for their trespass, then their ears shall be removed and be nailed to the market cross before they are removed from this realm.  And if thereafter they are found again within our Eastern Realm, they shall be hanged.  We do further prohibit and ban, with the full force of our royal authority, for the term of our reign, all and any of our subjects, spiritual and temporal, from bringing the dread and terrible piña de Indes into the Royal Presence under the pain of treason, loss and forfeiture of life, land and goods.

with toothpicks strongly resembling Her Majesty’s arrows…

Several relatives of the offending fruit were brought before the Queen, who ordered that they be dealt with (in Her kitchens) as a lesson to other potential malefactors. They were expeditiously dispatched, and their mortal remains were later presented in Court, with their heads paraded on pikes, and their bodies having been expertly prepared by the Royal Cooks for Their Majesties’ enjoyment.

Photos by Lord Sergei Rozvad syn.
Writ text by Mistress Alys Mackyntoich.


Filed under: Court, Tidings Tagged: pineapples

Archaeologists fail to solve mystery of Silchester

SCAtoday.net - Wed, 2014-10-08 18:18

Archaeologists have packed their tools and left the site of the Silchester Roman town in Hampshire, England, still without an answer as to why the major town was abandoned in the sixth century.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Viking burial research project draws to a close

SCAtoday.net - Wed, 2014-10-08 13:38

In 1999, Stephen Harrison and Raghnall Ó Floinn have headed a project to catalog Viking burials beneath the city of Dublin. Their work has produced an 800-page book entitled Viking Graves and Grave Goods in Ireland. The site is now considered the largest Viking burial zone in western Europe outside of Scandinavia.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Bergental/BBM Yule – December 13 – RP!

East Kingdom Gazette - Wed, 2014-10-08 13:00

This year’s joint Yule celebration will be held December 13, 2014 in Bergental (Springfield, MA).

Be Merry, Good Friends! Bergental and the Barony Beyond the Mountain unite once more to celebrate Yule and you are all invited guests. Traditional festivities include merchants, performances, music, games and family activities, A&S Classes, Heraldic Consultation, the Yule Ceremony, a Mysterious Stranger and a few surprises.

Our joyous Yule festivities will be graced by Their Royal Majesties King Edward and Queen Thyra.

Site Address:
First Congregational Church of West Springfield
20 Lathrop Street
Springfield, MA 01089
USA

The Site Opens at 10am and Closes at 10pm

Site Fees, including Dayboard:
Adults:  $10 prereg/$13 at the door
Children ages 6-17:  $8 prereg/$10 at the door
Family cap for site fee = $36 prereg/$46 at the door
$5.00 non-member surcharge added where applicable and in addition to the family cap.

Pre-registrations MUST BE RECEIVED by Wednesday November 26th.

If you live in Canada, please contact Mistress Pagan to arrange pre-registration without extra currency conversion fees.

Feast Fees: $10  per person occupying a chair, regardless of age, and in addition to the family cap.

WE WILL NOT be accepting feast reservations after the cut-off date of November 26th.

YOU MUST PRE-REGISTER if you wish to eat the feast!

Make checks payable to: “SCA MA, Inc., Barony of Bergental”.

Send Reservations to:
Mistress Pagan Graeme (Yolanda Graham)
36 Stratford Terrace, Springfield MA 01108
mistresspagangraeme@yahoo.com
413.364.0039

Autocrat contact info:

Bergental Co-Steward:
Mistress Eleanore MacCartheigh (Phred Jenkins)
misphred@yahoo.com

BBM Co-Steward:
Lady Ciara McRobbie (Anne Akin)
anne.akin@pfizer.com

Feast Cooks:
Master Aethelhawk Keyfinder
aethelhawk@yahoo.com
THL Siubhan Wallace
siubhanwallace@yahoo.com
(Jim and Judi Tazelaar: 802-279-6371)


Filed under: Events Tagged: BBM, Bergental, royal progress, Yule

Get Your East Kingdom 2015 Calendar!

East Kingdom Gazette - Wed, 2014-10-08 11:41

A small portion of the month of May by Mistress Ro Honig von Summerfeldt with Mistress Carolyne de laPointe

The Labours of the East, a 2015 calendar with artwork by scribes of the East Kingdom to benefit the Royal Travel Fund, goes on sale today. Each month features a poem about an SCA activity with an accompanying illustration. Blank notecards are also available in sets of 6 that feature parts of the illustrations.

The calendar and the notecards were designed for the enjoyment of members of the SCA regardless of kingdom and to explain the many things that happen in the SCA to people who are unfamiliar with the organization.

The calendar features poetry by Master Christian von Jaueregk and magnificent scribal and calligraphic art by Mistress Rhonwen glyn Conwy; Lady Lada Monguligin; Lady Sakura’i no Kesame; Mistress Eleanore MacCarthaigh; Mistress Ro Honig von Summerfeldt with Mistress Carolyne de laPointe; Mistress Eva Woderose; Lady Palotzi Marti; Baroness Emma Makilmone; Dona Camille des Jardins with Mistress Carolyne de la Pointe; Dona Isabel Chamberlaine; Mistress Khioniya Nikolaevna Ryseva;and Lady Lisabetta Medalia with Mistress Eleanor Catlyng.

Calendars are $17 + $ 3 shipping.  Notecards are $12 + $3 shipping. Calendars and notecards can be ordered at the website until November 1, 2014.

To see the artwork and order yours, go to www.eastkingdombookofdays.org.


Filed under: Arts and Sciences, Tidings Tagged: calendar, Calligraphy and Illumination

Polling Award Recommendations Due October 25

East Kingdom Gazette - Wed, 2014-10-08 10:40

Unto all who hear these words, greetings,

The second polling of Edward III and Thyra II will be starting shortly.

Recommendations are requested via the online form:
http://fluidsurveys.com/s/EKRecommendations/

All recommendations for our 2nd polling are due by Saturday, October 25.

Order members will be asked to respond to their 2nd polls by Saturday, Nov 22.

Please remember that there are always new folks who need to be considered, and long-standing members who have been overlooked. Please take a look at the current Order of Precedence, as well: http://op.wiglaf.org/index.php.

There is no deadline for non-polling recommendations.

Saying thank you to the populace via the awards system is one of the most important roles of the royalty. We appreciate your assistance in finding those who deserve such recognition.

In Service to the East Kingdom,
Edward & Thyra
King & Queen

Editor’s Note:  Need more information about the East Kingdom awards polling process? This article gives a good overview. You do not need to be a member of an order to recommend someone for an order. Any person may recommend any other person for any award.

East Kingdom polling awards are as follows:

Kingdom Orders of High Merit
Order of the Silver Crescent (OSC): Service
Order of the Maunche (OM): Arts and Sciences
Order of the Tygers Combattant (OTC): Armored (Rattan) Combat
Order of the Sagittarius (OSag): Archery
Order of the Golden Rapier (OGR): Rapier Combat

A quick guide to the full descriptions of all East Kingdom awards can be found here: http://www.sca.org/awards/east.html

Society Level – Peerages
Order of Chivlary: Armored (Rattan) Combat
Order of the Laurel: Arts and Sciences
Order of the Pelican: Service

 


Filed under: Court, Law and Policy, Official Notices Tagged: award recommendations, awards, Edward and Thyra, polling deadlines, polling orders, pollings

Medieval teen given face in Scotland

SCAtoday.net - Wed, 2014-10-08 09:12

In 2009, the remains of nearly 400 people were discovered by workers for the Edinburgh Trams system in Leith, Scotland. Now forensics experts have given one of the individuals, a teenage boy, a face. (photos)

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Categories: SCA news sites