Feed aggregator

Chivalry died at Agincourt

SCAtoday.net - Tue, 2014-11-18 15:01

In an excerpt from his book Agincourt: My Family, The Battle And The Fight For France, in the Mail Online, English writer and adventurer Sir Ranolph Fiennes discusses his ancestors' parts in the 1415 Battle of Agincourt, the day, he writes, chivalry died.

read more

Categories: SCA news sites

5000-year-old human footprints found in Denmark

History Blog - Mon, 2014-11-17 23:04

The excavations of future construction sites for the Fehmarn Belt Link tunnel continue to strike archaeological gold. Last month it was a 3,000-year-old flint dagger with an intact bark handle. Now Museum Lolland-Falster archaeologists reveal they’ve discovered two sets of Stone Age human footprints left around an extensive system of fixed gillnets, sticks of hazel mounted on stakes to form continuous weirs that trapped fish when the tide came in, on the Danish island of Lolland.

The Stone Age footprints are estimated to date back as far as 5,000 BC to 2,000 BC, to the time when water levels in the Baltic Sea were rising due to melting glaciers in northern Europe, and prehistoric people were able to use the inlets as bountiful fishing grounds. The individuals that made the footprints constructed elaborate fishing fences to catch their prey, and researchers say that the large wooden fences which interconnected to create a single continuous trap, were likely the cause of the footprints.

“What seems to have happened was that at some point they were moving out to the [fish fence], perhaps to recover it before a storm” project manager for the Museum Lolland-Falster, Lars Ewald Jensen says. “At one of the posts, the footprints were found on each side, where someone had been trying to remove it from the sea bottom.”

At least two people were involved in this rescue operation, leaving two sets of footprints of different sizes. They walked onto the wet seabed to pull up what they could of the gillnets and left deep impressions when their feet sank into the ground. Sand and mud then flowed into their prints. Thousands of years later, those prints were still clearly visible to archaeologists, both at the original depth and in dents on the surface.

Up until land reclamation efforts in the late 19th century, the coastal area where the footprints were found was dotted with fjords and streams and subject to regular flooding from the sea. A major Baltic flood in 1872 claimed 80 lives on Lolland. As a result, a vast dyke was built along nearly 40 miles of the island’s south coast. The dyke dried out the fjords. The gillnets bear witness to the constant battle against the incursions of sea water. The wattle had to be repeatedly repaired over the lifetime of the gillnets due in part to flood damage. Museum Lolland-Falster archaeologist Terje Stafseth notes in the museum press release (pdf):

“The investigations have shown that the Stone Age population repeatedly repaired, and actually moved parts of the capture system in order to ensure that it always worked and that it was placed optimally in relation to the coast and currents. We are able to follow the footprints and sense the importance of the capture system, which would have been important for the coastal population to retain a livelihood and therefore worth maintaining.”

These are the second-oldest human footprints found outside of Africa, with the oldest being the 800,000-year-old ones discovered on the rapidly-eroding foreshore of a beach in Happisburgh, Norfolk, in May of 2013. Most Stone Age remains recovered in Denmark are midden piles, broken tools or pottery. Archaeologists have found animal footprints from the period, but these are the first Stone Age human footprints ever found in Denmark.

Footprints and fishing trips weren’t the only discoveries on this ancient beach. Archaeologists also discovered several animal skulls from domestic and wild animals that appear to have been placed there deliberately as part of a ritual offering by farmers who inhabited the area in around 4,000 B.C. Fragments of skulls from assorted animals were placed on the coastal sea floor and then surrounded by crania of cattle and sheep. Axe shafts were placed around the skull sacrifice area which turned out to be quite large at 70 square meters (83 square yards).

The excavation is ongoing but the clock is ticking. This site along with so many others is likely to be destroyed when construction of the tunnel begins in a few months. The footprints and gillnets will be covered by an above-ground facility. All that will be left of the footprints that survived thousands of years will be flat molds taken by the archaeologists.

Categories: Arts and Sciences, History

Two Positions Available

East Kingdom Gazette - Mon, 2014-11-17 16:19

The East Kingdom Seneschal is looking for people to fill the following open positions:
Regional Seneschal for Tir Mara
Media Officer
If you are interested in either job, please send me a letter of interest and your resume or talk to me at an event.
Dueña Mercedes Vera de Calafia
Seneschal, East Kingdom


Filed under: Official Notices, Tidings

Summary of October BoD Meeting

SCAtoday.net - Mon, 2014-11-17 14:07

The Board of Directors quarterly meeting was held in St. Louis, MO on October 25, 2014, and the East Kingdom Gazette offers an unofficial summary.

read more

Categories: SCA news sites

Earliest officially licensed Batmobile for sale

History Blog - Sun, 2014-11-16 23:34

The Batmobile made for the 1966 TV show from a 1955 Lincoln Futura concept car by legendary car customizer George Barris may be the one we think of as the first Batmobile, but that’s just because the TV show was such a smash hit (pow! bam!) and the car so damn cool that it became an instant icon. Its iconic status garnered it $4.62 million including buyer’s premium when it sold at auction in January of 2013, and I myself repeatedly referred to it as the first Batmobile.

I was wrong. It’s the first of a long line of sublime to ridiculous television and film custom Batmobiles (the 1940s serials used a black Cadillac, a limo and a Mercury Eight, all off the line), but National Periodic Publications, owners of DC Comics, officially licensed a Batmobile built years before the TV show for promotional purposes. Its design comes straight from the comic book, a particularly great one at that, a product of the vision of artist Dick Sprang.

Dated February 1950, Detective Comics #156 hit the newsstands in December 1949 (spanning two decades!) and introduced a new Batmobile for a new decade. The story is that Batman is chasing mobster Smiley Dix when the bridge he’s driving over collapses. Batman breaks his leg and the Batmobile is totalled. Our hero takes advantage of his convalescence to build a new Batmobile — stronger, faster, and full of new bells and whistles. The “Batmobile of 1950″ was high-tech marvel with a radar antenna in the tail fin and a forensic laboratory in place of a back seat. It made an indelible impression on Batman fans, many of whom consider it the definitive design to this day.

Forrest Robinson was 13 years old when Detective Comics #156 was issued, and it certainly made an impression on him. For years he sketched ideas for a real Batmobile in his notebook. Ten years later, he bought a 1956 Oldsmobile Rocket 88 and designed a new look for it inspired by Sprang’s Batmobile. It took Robinson and his friend Len Perham three years of work in the Robinson family barn in New Hampshire to replace the Oldsmobile body with a custom fiberglass body 17 feet long and seven feet wide with the iconic single giant dorsal fin, an upturned bat-nose front, quad headlights, horizontal tailfins and doors that slide into pockets on the rear fenders. In 1963 the car was done. Robinson painted it space-age silver and drove it as his personal ride.

In 1966, the popularity of the Batman television program caused a Batmania throughout the land. The All Star Dairy Association, a national dairy co-op, spent $3 million to tap into this groundswell, licensing Batman, Robin and the Batmobile from National Periodic Publications for use in dairy-based promotional campaigns. They sold Batnog that Christmas and a variety of fruit drinks, ice cream, cones, sandwiches, etc. with Batman and Robin on the packaging. (Slam Bang Vanilla Ice Cream with Banana Marshmallow needs to make a comeback, by the way. It should never have left us.) It worked like a charm. By early 1967, sales on Batman-packaged ice creams increased 300%.

All Star’s New Hampshire affiliate, Green Acres Ice Cream, leased Robinson’s car to play to make personal appearances as the Batmobile. They repainted it in Batman black, put the Batman Dairy Foods logo on the doors and under the dorsal fin, and drove it around three northeastern states promoting Batman & Robin ice cream products. This was the first ever officially licensed touring Batmobile. George Barris’ Batmobiles, the Futura and its fiberglass-on-Ford-Galaxie copies, didn’t start touring until 1967.

After its turn selling ice cream to the kiddies, Forrest Robinson sold the car for $200 to a friend of his in 1967. The friend didn’t show the car much love, I’m afraid, and it spent decades rusting in a New Hampshire field before passing through several hands until it was acquired in 2011 by Florida car collector George Albright. He researched its history, contacting Robinson, Perham and dairy executives who remembered its service as the Batmobile. Not having the time and resources to dedicate to a proper restoration of the vehicle, in 2013, a month after the Barris Batmobile made such a splash at auction, he put it up for sale on eBay with a minimum bid of $19,800. He wound up pulling it and doing a private deal, selling it for an undisclosed amount to Toy Car Exchange LLC who have spent the past year restoring it to pristine condition. Thanks to the addition of red accents, it looks more Batmanny than it ever did.

Toy Car Exchange has now put the restored 1963 Batmobile for sale at Heritage Auctions’ Entertainment & Music Memorabilia auction on December 6th. The opening bid is $90,000.



Categories: Arts and Sciences, History

New secrets of Stonehenge revealed

SCAtoday.net - Sun, 2014-11-16 13:23

Just when scientists think they have learned everything there is to know about Stonehenge, new technologies reveal tantalizing secrets. Laser scanning of the area around the monument showed at least 17 circular shrines as well as other neolithic structures. (photo and map)

read more

Categories: SCA news sites

Keep yer treasures on ice, matey

SCAtoday.net - Sun, 2014-11-16 08:45

Whether it's for beer or coldcuts, disguising a modern cooler at period events is always a great idea. Joshwelch9 borrowed the idea from absinth-dragon and posted his plan to turn a cooler in a cool pirate chest on Instructables. (photos)

read more

Categories: SCA news sites

St. Francis manuscripts leave Italy for the first time

History Blog - Sat, 2014-11-15 23:26

Nineteen medieval artifacts from the Sacred Convent of St. Francis in Assisi that have never left Italy since their creation 700 years ago are heading to New York. There are no known extant documents written in Saint Francis’ own hand (historians think he dictated rather than writing himself). These 13th and 14th century manuscripts are the earliest surviving documents about Francis’ and the mendicant order he founded. The exhibition, Friar Francis: Traces, Words and Images, will be on display at the UN Headquarters from November 17th through the 29th but it’s not open to the public. They will be on public display when they move to the Brooklyn Borough Hall from December 2nd to January 14, 2015.

It’s divided into three sections. The first section, Traces, focuses on documents that are closely connected to Francis’ lifetime. The centerpiece is Codex 338, a collection of the oldest existing copies of Saint Francis’ writings, including the 12 chapters of the Rule of the Friors Minor and the Canticle of the Creatures or Canticle of the Sun, one of Francis’ most celebrated poems. The Canticle of Creatures is the first surviving works written in a dialect (Umbrian) recognizably resembling modern Italian. It is considered the oldest poem in Italian literature. There are also several Papal Bulls issued in the 1220s by popes Honorius III and Gregory IX regarding the regulation of the new order and, after Francis’s canonization in 1228 just two years after his death, ordering the construction of a new church to house his earthly remains.

The second section, Words, deals with hagiographies of Francis written after his death. The oldest is a fragmentary parchment of Vita Beati Francisci (The Life of Blessed Francis) by Father Tommaso da Celano commissioned by Pope Gregory IX around the time of Francis’ canonization. There’s also a very rare manuscript of Celano’s second biography, Memoriale Desiderio Animae de Gestis et Verbis Sanctissimi Patris Nostri Francisci (Memorial of the Desire of a Soul Concerning the Deeds and Words of Our Most Holy Father Francis), aka Seconda Vita (Second Life), which was commissioned in the mid-1240s by Crescentius of Jessi, Minister General of the Franciscan Order. A later work from the end of the 14th century, Fioretti di San Francesco (Little Flowers of St. Francis), is an idealized portrayal that would become the most popular hagiography of the saint and the basis for many future works of literature and art about Francis.

The last section, Images, features depictions of Saint Francis in miniature from illuminated manuscripts. There’s Francis at the foot of the crucified Christ in Ubertino da Casale’s Arbor Vitae Crucifixae Jesu, Francis in a little box amidst floral borders in the Breviarium Fratrum Minorum illuminated by painter Sano di Pietro for the convent of Saint Claire in Siena, and Francis ranking with Adam and Christ on the first page of Genesis in a Bible.

Before these precious and fragile documents could travel, they were subject to months of careful conservation.

Over the past five months, Father Massetti, two other monks and three young restoration experts have cleaned all the manuscripts with a soft paint brush, page by page.

In some, the medieval ink had perforated the page; in others it had faded. Some were missing entire figures or miniatures, others the binding cover.

The restoration experts have repaired the fissures of the parchment with Japanese vegetable fiber or a bovine membrane. They have consolidated the ink and the colorful paintings through a starch gel.

Five of the manuscripts, ranging from the size of a choral book to the pocket format, were unbound, parchment by parchment, and were finally reassembled and stitched back together with a linen thread.

So not only is it the first (and probably only) chance people in the US will have the chance to see these rare artifacts, they will be in the greatest condition they’ve been in for centuries. The exhibition was on display at the Chamber of Deputies, Italy’s lower house of parliament, in the Montecitorio Palace earlier this year, and although many countries have asked to host it, only New York has received the honor. It’s a fitting choice, seeing as 40% of the six million visitors to the Basilica of San Francesco d’Assisi hail from the United States.

Categories: Arts and Sciences, History

Viking history as told by the victims

SCAtoday.net - Sat, 2014-11-15 15:08

Just how bad were the Vikings? Historians have debated the issue for decades. In a feature article for National Geographic by Christopher Shea, Yale history professor Anders Winroth, author of The Age of the Vikings, argues that contemporary accounts were exaggerated, and the writers often contradicted themselves.

read more

Categories: SCA news sites

Summary of October BoD Meeting

East Kingdom Gazette - Sat, 2014-11-15 11:46

The Board of Directors quarterly meeting was held in St. Louis, MO on October 25, 2014. The following are summaries of discussions that happened at the meeting. It is not a comprehensive account and does not cover all agenda items discussed.  The Gazette would like to thank Mistress Katrei Grunenberg and Baroness Slaine ni Chiarain for taking notes for the Gazette.

All board of director meetings will be held in Milpitas in 2016 as a cost cutting measure. The costs saved will be used to fund a special project.

Standard language has been created for all affiliate agreements.

The Board will try to get draft agendas up at SCA.org in advance of board meetings as a result of a request from the East Kingdom Gazette.

A variance was granted for the unexpected delay of a coronation in Trimaris when the crown princess had to miss the original date due to a hospitalization.

A suggestion was made that those who have received background checks to work with youth have a card from the corporate office stating this. The idea will be investigated.

Tournaments Illumination will be doing special issues for the 50th anniversary that will cover the history of the SCA as well as service, chivalry, and A&S.  They will be looking for articles.

Trimaris will be conducting an experiment in using PayPal at events.

Online auctions are not allowed for official SCA fundraisers. They may be used for private fundraisers.

Official SCA funds or fundraiser proceeds cannot be directly distributed to retainers or household members of the Crown. Private fundraisers are not included in this restriction.

The possibility of dissolving the Chirugeonate has been discussed as result of comments made by lawyers and insurance agents who advise the SCA. The feedback from members is supportive of keeping the Chirurgeonate. A committee will be formed to work on how to keep the Chirurgeonate and also address the concerns. The Board is looking for people to serve on the committee who have experience as a medical professional or as a chirurgeon. Interested parties should contact Chairman Berk.

Feedback will be requested for the suggestions made by the Peerage Exploratory Committee.

Chairman Simon retired from the Board. The new Chairman is Scott Berk.


Filed under: Corporate Tagged: board of directors

UK£3,000 needed to secure Lindisfarne Hoard

SCAtoday.net - Sat, 2014-11-15 10:42

In 2003, builder Richard Mason found an old, pottery jug on the island of Lindisfarne, in northern England. Later, he noticed that the jug contained 17 coins, dating from the reigns of Henry VI - Elizabeth I. The silver and gold hoard has been valued at UK£30,900, but the Great North Museum in Newcastle needs an additional UK£3,000 to purchase the coins for its collection. (photo)

read more

Categories: SCA news sites

Hospital scan reveals contents of Carolingian pot

History Blog - Fri, 2014-11-14 23:59

The Carolingian pot that was part of a Viking hoard discovered by metal detectorist Derek McLennan in Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland, last September has been CT scanned in a hospital. The silver alloy vessel is covered in verdigris (the green powdery substance produced from the corrosion of copper) and experts were concerned that it was too fragile to just take off the lid and dig out its contents blind. Richard Welander, Historic Scotland’s head of collections, contacted Dr. John Reid, a radiographer at Borders General Hospital and avid amateur archaeologist who had previously collaborated with Historic Scotland to scan the remains of a Roman soldier’s head discovered at the Trimontium fort in Newstead.

Dr. Reid secured permission from hospital chief Calum Campbell for the £485,000 CT scanner to be used on the pot. So as not to interfere with the machine’s normal operations on actual human beings, the vessel was brought in the evening and was scanned. Derek McLennan and Richard Welander were present to witness the pot’s innards scanned in 120 visual slices accurate to within a half a millimeter.

At first glance, one view revealed the presence of an Anglo-Saxon openwork brooch, a 9th century style seen in several pieces from the Pentney Hoard, now in the British Museum. Further examination of the CT scan results identified four other silver brooches, some gold ingots and ivory beads coated in gold. The contents are all wrapped in an organic material of some kind, possibly leather.

Now that they know the layout of the contents, conservators will be able to remove the contents in a controlled way.

Richard Welander, head of collections with Historic Scotland, said: “When I saw the results I was reminded of the words of Sir Howard Carter when Tutankhamen’s tomb was opened in 1922 – “I see wonderful things”.

“We are all so grateful to the Borders General Hospital for allowing us to forensically examine one of the key objects of the hoard.

“As with human patients, we need to investigate in a non-invasive way before moving onto delicate surgery.

“In this case, that will be the careful removal of the contents and the all-important conservation of these items.”

The wrapping is going to make it a particularly challenging mission since it could easily fall apart the minute it’s exposed to air or interfered with in any way. I hope they film the surgery like they did the CT scan (see video below) because it’s sure to be fascinating.

The scan also revealed more detail of the decoration on the exterior of the pot which is partially obscured by mud and a textile of some kind (no word yet on what that is). It’s that decoration that identifies the pot as Carolingian in origin, created between 780 and 900 A.D. It is a very rare discovery in Britain — only three, including this one, have ever been found — and this one is complete with its original lid still attached.

Categories: Arts and Sciences, History

New SCA Membership Website Now Live

East Kingdom Gazette - Fri, 2014-11-14 16:30

The new SCA membership page is now available.

To access your information initially, you will log in with your member number and default password (first initial and last name, for example Jennifer O’Hara would use johara as a default password). You will immediately be prompted to create your own login credentials, both user name and password.

On the membership page, all of a member’s information is available, including type of membership; membership expiration date; and address, e-mail address, and telephone number on file. You can also renew or upgrade your membership, request a new membership card, and reprint proof of membership.

Additionally, there is a marketplace page where various publications are available for purchase. These include issues of Compleat Anachronist and Tournaments Illuminated as well as various society handbooks.


Filed under: Corporate

What's inside the Pot? Find out in this week's Medieval News Roundup

Medievalists.net - Fri, 2014-11-14 15:06
From a Medieval Fifty Shades of Grey to Black Death vs Zombie Apocalypse, here are some of the news medievalists want to know...

[View the story "What's inside the Pot? Find out in this week's Medieval News Roundup" on Storify]

Categories: History, SCA news sites

SCA Feast Survey results are online

SCAtoday.net - Fri, 2014-11-14 14:11

Wulfwen Atte Belle and Antonio Bellini have announced that the results for the SCA Feast Survey are now available to download from the Barony of Sternfeld website.

read more

Categories: SCA news sites

Baron Tigernach mac Cathail placed on vigil in AEthelmearc

SCAtoday.net - Fri, 2014-11-14 11:16

Kameshima Zentarou Umakai, Silver Buccle Principal Herald, reports that, at Their Court at Siege of Glengary, Their Majesties Titus and Anna Leigh of the Kingdom of AEthelmearc placed Baron Tigernach mac Cathail on vigil to contemplate elevation to the Order of the Pelican.

read more

Categories: SCA news sites

New Peers in Lochac

SCAtoday.net - Thu, 2014-11-13 23:15

Lord Gunther Boese, Canon Herald for the Kingdom of Lochac, reports that Their Majesties Niáll and Liadan have chosen to offer Peerages to four of Their subjects over the past two months.

read more

Categories: SCA news sites

Unique remains of Ice Age infants found in Alaska

History Blog - Thu, 2014-11-13 23:03

The skeletons of two Ice Age infants discovered at the Upward Sun River archaeological site in central Alaska are the earliest human remains ever found in northern North America. The presence of grave goods is also unprecedented for an infant burial of this era. The remains date to about 11,500 years ago. By analyzing tooth eruption sequences (the stages of the teeth growing out of the jaw), archaeologists were able to determine that one of them is a very young infant, between six and 12 weeks old, while the other was a neonate above 30 gestational weeks, so it was either stillborn or born too premature to live.

These are the youngest individuals from the late Pleistocene to receive a formal burial found anywhere in North America. The only discovery that comes close is the child buried at the Late Clovis Anzick site in Montana around 13,000 years ago, and he was two years old at time of death. It’s rare to find burials of very young infants from highly mobile foraging societies because they didn’t stay in one place for long so there’s no central location like a cemetery and the odds are slim of encountering individual burials even of larger humans. The Upper Sun River site was a residential campsite, not a dedicated burial ground, and yet, three individuals were found buried there within the same feature: the two inhumed infants with grave goods, and a cremated three-year-old with no grave goods. That’s another thing that is unique about this discovery.

Archaeologists found evidence of six different occupations of the site separated by hundreds or thousands of years. All but one of them were short-term camps occupied for no more than a few days while people hunted small game (squirrels, hares, ptarmigan) and fished the plentiful summer salmon in the nearby Tanana River. They’d take their harvest back to the base camp and cook it on hearths. The third occupation is the only one that had a longer-term presence. In addition to 10 cooking hearths, the third occupation features the remains of a dwelling and the burials.

Because of the undisturbed faunal and lithic material excavated from the context of the burials, it seems the two infants were buried at the same time. The cremated remains were buried later (they were found first, in 2010; the infant remains were found last year about 16 inches beneath the cremation) but all three were either buried during the same summer or in subsequent summers. Radiocarbon dating confirms that the lower and upper finds are contemporaneous. Given the consistency of the faunal remains in the ground fill and in the hearth that tops the burial pit, the third occupation base camp was populated by the same people. They could have been the one band or maybe even one family. Archaeologists are optimistic that they’ll be able to retrieve testable samples of nuclear, mitochrondrial and Y-chromosome DNA from the remains which should tell us whether they had a familial relationship.

Since the double infant burial and the toddler cremation were done by the same people around the same time, there is no obvious reason for the differential treatment of the burials. It wasn’t a seasonal accommodation — frozen ground in the winter forcing cremations — because all three burials happened in the summer. There may have been a situational distinction — who was present for the burials, say — or perhaps a religious or cultural one.

The grave goods and funerary customs in the double infant burial are extensive. Archaeologists unearthed four antler rods, foreshafts to which projectile points would have been hafted, decorated along the whole length with geometric abstract incisions. This too is unprecedented. There are some scratchings or possible ownership marks on other paleo-Indian foreshafts, but these are the first ones found with the whole length decorated. Two stone projectiles, dart or spear points, were found placed at the end of two of the rods, exactly where they would have been attached with animal sinew that has now deteriorated. That makes these the earliest hafted shafts discovered in North America, and the first concrete evidence that the foreshafts were topped with stone points.

The entire pit and its contents were covered with ochre, a common element in pre-historic burials most likely due to the association of red with blood and therefore life. The bottom of the pit was lined with ochre, all of the grave goods were coated in it and all of the bones. The articulation of the infant skeletons — knees drawn to the chest, arms folded — suggest they were wrapped in that position before burial. Over time the wrappings disintegrated and the ochre in the pit then covered the bones.

[University of Alaska Fairbanks professor Ben] Potter and his colleagues note that the human remains and associated burial offerings, as well as inferences about the time of year the children died and were buried, could lead to new thinking about how early societies were structured, the stresses they faced as they tried to survive, how they treated the youngest members of their society, and how they viewed death and the importance of rituals associated with it.

“Taken collectively, these burials and cremation reflect complex behaviors related to death among the early inhabitants of North America,” Potter said.

Here is some b-roll of the excavation with great close-ups of the ochre-coated antler rods and a projectile point in situ:

Categories: Arts and Sciences, History

Call for Applicants – Southern Region Deputy Rapier Marshal

East Kingdom Gazette - Thu, 2014-11-13 19:04

Don Frasier MacLeod has requested we share the following announcement with our readers.

As I have mentioned, I am in the process of replacing several of my Regional Rapier Deputies, and to that end I am officially requesting resumes for anyone interested in the Southern Regional Rapier Deputy position.  I would like to take this opportunity to thank Don Griffith Davion for his outstanding service to the Southern Region and the East Kingdom as Southern Regional Rapier Deputy.  I will be accepting resumes until December 1st, after which time I will review those resumes I have received and make a decision as to Don Griffith’s successor.

In Service,
Don Frasier MacLeod, KRM, East


Filed under: Fencing

Ansteorra Fall 2014 Coronation photos online

SCAtoday.net - Thu, 2014-11-13 18:00

Caelin on Andrede reports that he has created a large album of photos from Fall 2014 Coronation which took place recently in the Kingdom of Ansteorra.

read more

Categories: SCA news sites