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Resubscribe to the EK Discussion Lists

East Kingdom Gazette - Wed, 2014-06-18 16:13

With the recent migration to new East Kingdom servers, members have been advised that they need to resubscribe to the various discussion lists. Duchess Katherine would like people to know that resubscription is only required for the discussion lists. There is no need to resubscribe to the polling lists.


Filed under: Uncategorized Tagged: discussion lists

Offa's Dyke may be misnamed

SCAtoday.net - Wed, 2014-06-18 12:40

Offa's Dyke, a linear earthwork stretching 177 miles (285 km) in Chirk near the Shropshire border, may be misnamed. Legendarily built by King Offa of Mercia during his reign between 757 and 796, the earthwork may actually be 200 years older.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Pennsic 43 Online Pre-Registration deadline extended through June 18

SCAtoday.net - Wed, 2014-06-18 10:15

Due to technical problems with the online registration site in recent days, Coopers Lake Campground has extended the deadline for online Pennsic registration until the last minute of June 18, 2014.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Plans for Richard III’s tomb, reburial finalized

History Blog - Tue, 2014-06-17 23:44

As there has been no appeal lodged to contest the ruling of the High Court that the remains of King Richard III are to be reinterred in Leicester Cathedral, plans for the reburial have been finalized. The Cathedral Fabrics Commission for England have approved the tomb design of architects van Heningen and Haward. There’s no inlaid marble white rose of York underneath the raised platform in this version. Instead, a plinth made of black Kilkenny marble will seal the tomb beneath the Cathedral floor. Richard’s name, dates and motto will be engraved into the sides of the plinth — the nature of the marble will make the lettering appear white in contrast with the dark color of the smooth surface — while his coat of arms is inlaid in marble and semi-precious hard stones at the top foot of the plinth.

On top of the plinth will be a large rectangular block of Swaledale fossil stone, quarried in North Yorkshire, deeply incised with a cross along its full length and breadth. The fossil stone is so called because it is peppered with visible fossils, once-living beings long dead whose remains have been brought to light and immortalized in stone, a metaphorically significant analogy to Richard’s fate.

Underneath the plinth, Richard’s remains will be laid to rest in a lead ossuary which will be placed in an oak coffin which in turn be placed in a brick lined vault under the Cathedral floor. The precise design of the wooden coffin is still being worked out and will be announced at a later date, but the carpenter who will make the coffin has been selected already. It’s Michael Ibsen, Richard’s sixteenth grand-nephew, a direct descendant down the maternal line of Richard’s sister Anne of York whose mitochondrial DNA helped identify the King’s remains. He’s a cabinet and furniture maker by trade, so it’s a fitting commission in every way. Ibsen accepted the work offer with alacrity, calling it “a very appropriate gift to offer to [his] royal ancestor.”

The oak coffin will play an important role in the reburial ceremony. The ossuary will be placed in the coffin at the University of Leicester and the coffin will then be transported to the Cathedral along a public route that will follow what we know of King Richard’s movements on the last days of his life. It will be received formally by Cathedral officials accompanied by the medieval service of Compline. The coffin will then lie in state covered with a pall that will feature scenes from Richard’s life and death. The public will be invited to pay their respects at this time.

The reburial service will not be a funeral as Richard had one of those already. Instead it will be a special service designed according to detailed research of medieval reinterment rites (reburials were quite common back then, and there are extant sources describing the services). The service will conclude with the coffin being lowered into the brick vault. The tomb will be sealed overnight with the stone plinth and the sarcophagus-like Swaledale fossil stone marker.

The tomb and marker will be installed in an ambulatory (an open walking space) between the new Chapel of Christ the King and the sanctuary under the tower, the most holy place in the Cathedral where the main altar stands. It will be a peaceful, quiet spot, separated from the main worship area of the Cathedral by the relocated Nicholson screen, an ornately carved screen created in the 1920s by ecclesiastical architect and baronet Sir Charles Nicholson to separate the nave from the chancel.

Cathedral officials hope to start the construction work this summer so the building can be finished by early 2015 in time for a Spring reburial. The total budget for this project is £2,500,000 ($4,240,000). The Diocese of Leicester will contribute £500,000 ($848,000) and £100,000 ($170,000) has already been collected in donations. Much of the rest will come from large grants from trusts, foundations and private donors. There will be a fundraising appeal later this year targeted to the Leicester community, giving local residents the opportunity to fund a specific element of the reburial project. Meanwhile, donations are open. If you’d like to contribute, you can do so online here or you can print out this pdf form for sending in a donation by mail.

Categories: Arts and Sciences, History

Pennsic Pre-Reg Extended to Wednesday June 18th

East Kingdom Gazette - Tue, 2014-06-17 18:10

Due to the server downtime on the Cooper’s website yesterday, paid Pennsic Registration has been extended through 11:59pm, Wednesday, June 18th.

There is a link to register on the Pennsic War Site. The Cooper’s Site lists registration as closed, but has changed the date, and you are still able to register.


Filed under: Pennsic

Quatrefoil stone helps trace history of Codnor Castle

SCAtoday.net - Tue, 2014-06-17 17:23

Codnor Castle, a 13th century stone keep and bailey fortress, is a fragile ruin in Derbyshire, England about which little is known, but the discovery of a 13th century stone quatrefoil may help experts learn more about the structure.

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Categories: SCA news sites

New work added to CalonSound Project

SCAtoday.net - Tue, 2014-06-17 12:18

The Falcon Banner, an online news source for the Kingdom of Calontir, reports that a new work, Hymn for the Soup Kitchen by Andrixos Seljukroctoni, has been added to the website for the CalonSound Project.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Elevations offered at AEthelmearc War Practice 2014

SCAtoday.net - Tue, 2014-06-17 08:31

Kameshima-ky Zentarou Umakai reports that at the recent War Practice, Their Majesties Tindal and Etain of the Kingdom of AEthelmearc offered elevation to the Peerage to four of Their subjects.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Make your own 19th c. patent medicines

History Blog - Mon, 2014-06-16 23:22

During an archaeological survey before construction of a new hotel at 50 Bowery in New York City, archaeologists unearthed a trove of 19th century bottles from when the space was occupied by a German beer garden. Atlantic Gardens offered beer and live entertainment from 1858 until it closed in 1916, leaving behind all kinds of dishes and bottles. Among the latter were bottles of patent medicine, nostrums made from combinations of herbs and alcohol or even narcotics like opium, that claimed to cure a wide variety of ailments.

One of the bottles was a small green glass cylinder labeled “Elixir of Long Life.” Two bottles of Dr. Hostetters Stomach Bitters were also discovered at the site. With the empty vessels in hand, the experts of contractor Chrysalis Archaeology decided to seek out recipes and recreate the products that once sold briskly at taverns as well as at apothecary shops and from street vendors.

After researching the brands in German, the team found that The Elixir of Long Life is a fairly straight-forward collection of ingredients from the herbalist handbook — aloe, an anti-inflammatory, gentian root, a digestive aid — combined with lots of alcohol. Dr. Hostetters Stomach Bitters went a bit further afield:

The Hostetters recipe is a bit more complex, containing Peruvian bark, also known as cinchona, which is used for its malaria-fighting properties and is still used to make bitters for cocktails, and gum kino, a kind of tree sap that is antibacterial. It also contains more common ingredients, including cinnamon and cardamom seeds, which are known to help prevent gas.

But it too was proportionally dominated by grain alcohol, so even if the herbs didn’t cure what ailed you, the rest of it would make you forget about how sick you were. In fact, although Dr. Hostetters bitters may not be sold as medicines anymore, its cousins like Angostura and Aperol are popular ingredients in cocktails and are often consumed before or after meals because they’re still considered digestive boosts, a hangover from their days of being sold at taverns to quell the stomach demons.

But why should the archaeologists have all the fun? Here are the recipes to make your own Elixir of Long Life and Dr. Hostetters Stomach Bitters in the comfort of your own home.

Elixir of Long Life:

Aloes – 13 grams
Rhubarb – 2.3 grams
Gentian – 2.3 grams
Zedoary (white turmeric) – 2.3 grams
Spanish saffron – 2.3 grams
Water – 4 ounces
Grain alcohol (vodka, gin) – 12 ounces

Squeeze out the liquid from the aloe and set aside. Crush the rhubarb, gentian, zedoary and Spanish saffron (for a modern twist, use a blender for this part), and mix them with the aloe liquid, water and alcohol. Let the mixture sit for three days, shaking frequently. Then filter it using a cheesecloth or coffee filter, and serve. Be careful with the liquid — the saffron can dye your hands or other kitchen items.

Dr. Hostetters Stomach Bitters:

Gentian root – 1 1/2 ounces
Orange peel – 2 1/2 ounces
Cinnamon – 1/4 ounce
Anise – 1/2 ounces
Coriander seed – 1/2 ounce
Cardamom seed – 1/8 ounce
Un-ground Peruvian bark (cinchona) – 1/2 ounce
Gum kino – 1/4 ounce
Grain alcohol (vodka, gin) – 1 quart
Water – 4 quarts
Sugar – 1 pound

Mash together the gentian, orange peel, cinnamon, anise, coriander, cardamom and Peruvian bark. Mix the crushed ingredients with the gum kino and the alcohol. Let the mixture sit in a closed container for two weeks, shaking occasionally. Strain the mixture, add the sugar and water to the strained liquid and serve.

 

Categories: Arts and Sciences, History

Wark Castle vanguard of Flodden 500 project

SCAtoday.net - Mon, 2014-06-16 21:05

The Battle of Flodden, between the Scottish and English kings, took place in 1513. Now the battle is being commemorated by experts and volunteers for the Flodden 500 Archaeological project. The focus for 2014 will be Wark Castle on the Northumberland side of the River Tweed.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Known World Children's Fete volunteers needed

SCAtoday.net - Mon, 2014-06-16 16:48

Lady Aine O Grienan is seeking volunteers to help with the Known World Children's Fete at Pennsic 43. The fun-filled afternoon will take place the Wednesday of War Week.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Web Team Working on Migration Issues

East Kingdom Gazette - Mon, 2014-06-16 15:34

Lady Raffaella Mascolo, EK Webminister, and her team are working to resolve the issues that remain from the server migration over the weekend. She assures the Gazette that solutions will be achieved as soon as possible, and asks everyone affected to please have patience.

Most changes were implemented gradually and with minimal impact over the last month or so, but many people have been affected by the more visible purging last Friday of all the e-mail discussion lists hosted on the EK servers. Note that there were many special interest lists and officer staff lists affected, not just the award Order discussion lists, and some lists’ administrators and subscribers did not realize that they would be affected by the final move last Friday.

The subscribers of every list “at eastkingdom dot org” were purged, and only the list titles and administrators were set up on the new server. Members of the lists were instructed to re-subscribe beginning today (see Mailing List Migration), but the transfer has been complicated by the many people who attempted to re-subscribe between Friday and Sunday.

If you tried today to re-subscribe to any lists, your request is probably pending approval by the administrators of each list; you should receive an automated message when your request is approved. If your request was made before today, it may or may not be pending. To this writer’s knowledge, NO approval messages have gone out, except for lists that can be joined without administrator approval. If you have not yet received an approval message, please wait a day or so before worrying, re-trying or inquiring.

The best way to re-subscribe to the Order discussion and polling distribution lists is through the Polling Lists page.

For other lists (such as “exchequers” or “ekchatelaines”, etc.) send an e-mail from your account to:  listname-join@lists.eastkingdom.org
substituting listname with the actual name of the list you wish to join; the message body and subject line can be left empty, or just put “subscribe”.

Some special interest groups may be taking this opportunity to set up new e-mail lists hosted elsewhere. If a list you were on has another way of communicating with its members (such as a FaceBook page or Google Group), check there for instructions.

Update, 6:30pm June 16, 2014:

Greetings,
The moderators for the lists / polling orders have been informed that the
lists are active again. PLEASE give them time to approve all requests to
join back to discussion lists and polling order lists.
YIS,
Raffaella Mascolo
EK Web Minister


Filed under: Official Notices Tagged: email discussion lists, webminister, websites

Bannockburn comes to the BBC

SCAtoday.net - Mon, 2014-06-16 13:11

The BBC celebrates the anniversary of the Battle of Bannockburn with a two-program event, which premiered early in June 2014, entitled The Quest For Bannockburn. The program features Neil Oliver and Tony Pollard.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Agenda for Next EK Curia

East Kingdom Gazette - Mon, 2014-06-16 09:58

Mistress Mercedes Vera de Calafia, Seneschale of the East Kingdom, wishes to share the following:

The agenda for the next curia has been posted on the Seneschal’s page. Curia will be at Southern Region War Camp, June 28th 10am.


Filed under: Law and Policy, Official Notices Tagged: agenda, curia

Picasso curtain will move to NY Historical Society

History Blog - Sun, 2014-06-15 23:38

The biggest Picasso in the United States will be leaving its home on a wall at the Four Seasons restaurant in New York for what one hopes will be greener pastures at the New York Historical Society. RFR Holding, owner of the historic Seagram Building where the Four Seasons and the 19-by-20-foot theatrical curtain have lived together in harmony since 1957, planned to remove the work last year. It claimed the wall on which it hung was structurally unsound due to a leaking steam pipe and informed the New York Landmarks Conservancy, owner of the painting since it was donated to it by Vivendi Universal, then owner of the Seagram Building, in 2005, that the curtain would be coming down immediately.

The Conservancy challenged the plan in court. They said the curtain was far too fragile to be moved, especially by rolling the canvas up “one click at a time” and transporting it in a rental van. At the last minute, the court sided with the Conservancy and issued a temporary restraining order. Since then, RFR Holding and the Landmarks Conservancy have been locked in a struggle over the fate of the historical curtain. The discussions have now apparently borne fruit, and the front cloth painted by Pablo Picasso in 1919 for a production of the Ballets Russes’ Le Tricorne will be moved to the New York Historical Society, conserved and put on display, all at RFR’s expense.

To move the Picasso, workers will mount hydraulic lifts to detach the top of the curtain from the wall. It will then be wrapped around a wide roller, starting at the bottom. The curtain will first go to a conservator, for cleaning and restoration work. The historical society plans to have it installed for an exhibition in May.

That process sounds a lot like the original “one click at a time” plan which the Conservancy deemed far too dangerous. The art mover agreed that the painting could “crack like a potato chip” under the strain. The Conservancy isn’t too thrilled about it, judging from their press release, but they will have conservators on the ground during the removal and transport stages.

The impetus for this compromise is the looming defeat in court the Conservancy expected. The donation was made on the condition that the curtain remain where it was at the Four Seasons, but that wasn’t going to be able to trump RFR’s solid legal position. From the Landmarks Conservancy press release:

We did our best to maintain it in place. But our only leverage was that the Curtain is specifically included in the current restaurant lease. It was made clear to us that the Curtain would not be included in whatever new lease is negotiated. So, if we had prevailed in Court, the most a judge could grant is that the Curtain stay until the end of the current lease.

Phyllis Lambert, daughter of Seagram founder Samuel Bronfman, purchased and installed the curtain in 1957. She’s not in favor of this plan.

“It sort of breaks my heart,” she said.

Vivendi bought the Seagram company, including its large art collection, in 2000, around the time Mr. Rosen bought the Seagram Building. Later, the financially ailing Vivendi moved to sell the entire Seagram art collection, but Ms. Lambert persuaded Vivendi to bequeath the Picasso to the conservancy.

Lambert has every reason to be bummed. The curtain is an iconic part of what has become a beloved and famous interior. However, the Conservancy had few options here, and it’s undoubtedly better for its long-term prospects for the painting to be in the hands of a museum instead of a company owned by a man who once called the curtain a “schmatte” (Yiddish for “rag”) and who appears to be keen to install works from his own modern art collection in the space. The pressing issue is how to ensure the least possible trauma in the removal and transportation.

The New York Historical Society is thrilled to have it. They plan to make Le Tricorne the centerpiece of the second-floor gallery.

 

Categories: Arts and Sciences, History

Last Day for Paid PreReg for Pennsic

East Kingdom Gazette - Sun, 2014-06-15 23:24

Photo by Cateline la Broderesse

Paid registration for Pennsic ends on Monday, June 16th at 11:59pm EDT.  The size of the land allotted to a group is determined by the number of people who preregister by this deadline.  Unpaid online registration is available until July 11th.  Preregistration is available at this website.


Filed under: Pennsic

Call for Kingdom Event Bids

East Kingdom Gazette - Sun, 2014-06-15 23:12

Photo by Baroness Cateline la broderesse

The following message is from Their Royal Highnesses, Edward and Thyra

Greetings to the East Kingdom,

We are eagerly anticipating the events that we will get to spend with all of you throughout the kingdom. We are seeking hosts for the major kingdom events, as we arrange our travel schedule. As we would like to see as many of you as we can, we are looking to merge landmark events together, such as investitures, champions events, and major annual events.

If you are contemplating entering a bid, please talk to us first regarding dates. We are listing some of our preferred dates below, which will fit into our progress. Please refer to the Royal Progress calendar to avoid other scheduled events such as foreign wars. Please contact us if you have any questions at all.

Coronation, 9/27 preferred
bids were due 6/1 (needed asap)

Fall Crown (northern region), 11/1 preferred
bids are due 7/1

12th Night, early January
bids were due 6/1 (needed asap)

Fencing Championship, Oct-Dec
bids 6/1 (needed asap)

Bards’ Championship, Feb-Mar
bids are due 10/1

A&S Championship, Feb-Mar
bids are due 7/1

Thank you to everyone for their hard work in running the Kingdom level events!
We are looking forward to hearing from you.
Edward & Thyra
Prince & Princess


Filed under: Events, Official Notices

Rethinking Attila the Hun

SCAtoday.net - Sun, 2014-06-15 13:27

Attila the Hun, called the “scourge of god” in the 5th century, has historically been considered a ruthless barbarian for his campaign against the Romans' eastern empire, but new thought shows the king to be somewhat more complex. Owen Jarus has a feature story for Live Science.

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Categories: SCA news sites

London church with Shakespeare connection sought

SCAtoday.net - Sun, 2014-06-15 09:11

St Leonard's church in Shoreditch, England, best known as the backdrop for the hit BBC series Rev, is believed to have been the site of the medieval church where Shakespeare worshiped. Now archaeologists plan to investigate the area in search of the original building.

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Categories: SCA news sites

Maya council house found in Guatemala

History Blog - Sat, 2014-06-14 23:14

Archaeologists have discovered a 700-year-old council house, a space dedicated to political and religious purposes, in the ancient site of Nixtun-Ch’ich’ in Petén, Guatemala. The house is a square about 164 feet by 164 feet. The interior has two collonaded halls that were once decorated with animal sculptures — the carved heads of a reptile (snake or crocodile) and a parrot were found in the home — built next to each other, and two altars.

A Mayan group called the Chakan Itza would have used this council house as a place to hold meetings, worship gods, make alliances and officiate marriage ceremonies.

“Basically almost every political and religious ritual would have been held there,” [Queens College professor Timothy] Pugh told Live Science in an interview. The leaders who gathered there would have held power in the community and perhaps the broader region. Among the artifacts is an incense burner showing the head of Itzamna, who was the “shaman of the gods,” Pugh said.

The house was devoted to its role between 1300 and 1500, after which it was deliberately destroyed by the Chakan Itza and the seat of power moved. This was part of the process of transition from one calendar period to the next. The ritual required that the altars be demolished and the house covered with a thin layer of ceremonial dirt representing burial.

The city of Nixtun-Ch’ich’ was a thriving metropolis when the council house was built. Its importance was confirmed by the discovery of a vast Mayan ball court, the second largest ever found. The first largest is at Chichen Itza in Mexico’s Yucatán peninsula. The Chakan Itza people claimed the Chichen Itza builders as their ancestors (hence the name), that they had migrated from what is today Mexico and settled in Guatemala.

They only had a few centuries to enjoy their new surroundings. In the 17th century, the Spanish conquered Petén, bringing death from war and disease to the Chakan Itza who were close to extermination. There are still Itza people today, but their language is almost extinct. Only a handful of surviving people still speak it. The rest speak Spanish.

 

Categories: Arts and Sciences, History