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Arts & Sciences Research Paper #9: Making green paint medievally with spring irises and fall buckthorn berries

Mon, 2016-05-02 09:03

Our ninth A&S Research Paper comes to us from Lady Adrienne d’Evreus, of the Province of Malagentia. She turns to the flora of her woodlands to learn ways that medieval painters made green pigments. (Prospective future contributors, please check out our original Call for Papers.)

Making green paint medievally with spring irises and fall buckthorn berries

Iris flower and buckthorn berries. Photo by Adrienne d’Evreus.

Many medieval manuscripts explain how to make green for illumination with seasonably available resources. Excited to make green from my local plants, I used iris in May and buckthorn in September to make some beautiful green paint using instructions from an anonymous medieval treatise, De Arte Illuminandi. Even with some incorrect assumptions about materials, by using translated fourteenth century instructions as a guide with iris blossoms and buckthorn berries, beautiful green pigment was produced.

Contents
Iris blossoms and iris green
Buckthorn berries and sap green
References

According to Daniel V. Thompson in The Materials and Techniques of Medieval Painting, the primary medieval substitutes for verdigris in book illumination were iris and sap green (Thompson 169-171). I was inspired by his book and excited to make green paint using some medieval methods.

Iris blossoms and green

My love of iris began as a child in my father’s gardens as I learned how to grow with him. His observation that they tolerated and seemed to enjoy wet soil was driven home years later as a college student when I accidentally chose a tidal riverbed for a late night nap after dark and woke up with the break of dawn a few hours later getting increasingly damp in rising tidewater amongst these beautiful blue lilies! The place I chose for my iris at home is a garden spot that floods in the spring and stays moist but not sopping in the summer. They seem to be very happy and produce many blossoms every year.

Looking to medieval manuscripts to make recipes for iris or lily green (Thompson and Hamilton 2), instructions were found in Mappae Clavicula (Smith and Hawthorne 51), De Arte Illuminandi (Thompson and Hamilton 6-7) and a number of Mary P. Merrifield’s Original Treatises (Merrifield ccxix, 422, 504 and 678, 684), often as clothlets. On Merrifield’s page 678 and 684 she translates recipes from a seventeenth century manuscript. Those recipes inspired me to try fermented iris juice experiments too.

Clothlets are a means of storing pigments. The impregnated cloth could later be placed into a dish (Thompson 144) or clam shell (Thompson and Hamilton 17) and wetted with a bit of glair (egg white) or gum water, and it would release its stored pigment into the vessel, creating a transparent stain. The glossary of the British Library describes “clothlet” as “A piece of cloth impregnated with pigment (generally a vegetable dye)” and in The Materials and Techniques of Medieval Painting Thompson says:

“iris green… was made from the juice of iris flowers, sometimes mixed with alum and thickened… but more often prepared as a clothlet. Bits of cloth were dipped into the juice of iris flowers and dried, again and again, until they contained a sufficient quantity of the color.” (Thompson 171)

De Arte Illuminandi indicates that you should pound iris blossoms in a mortar and pestle then squeeze them through a cloth to extract the juice. Linen cloths pre-treated with rock alum should then be dipped in the juice and dried in the shade multiple times. These clothlets are then stored in books. (Thompson and Hamilton 7). Merrifield’s “Bolognese Manuscript” from the fifteenth century calls for dipping the cloths in rock alum first then iris juice and keeping these cloths in a closed box (Merrifield 422).

The recipes often consist of adding alum to the iris juice. I didn’t get the Dover edition of Merrifield’s Original Treatises until Christmas of 2015 so for the 2015 experiments I used alum acquired from a modern and traditional dye supplier—aluminum sulfate, Al2(SO4)3. What was actually indicated and used by the medieval craftsman was rock alum, defined in the Dover edition of Merrifield’s glossary as potassium aluminum sulfate, KAl3(SO4)2(OH)6 (Alexander xii, xxviii).

Taking the advice of Wendy Feldberg, I collected iris blossoms as they bloomed daily at the end of May and beginning of June in 2015 and froze them to try with the recipes when they were done blooming. Though there were not freezers in medieval Europe, this seemed like a reasonable compromise since spring inspires so many other activities and obligations. After freezing and thawing the iris blossoms, without the added work of ‘pounding’, they gave me 78.91g of gorgeous transparent blue liquid that I poured into a clean glass jar. I separated the juice into four portions, adding additional variables.

I wondered what would happen when you didn’t modify the juice at all or exposed it to alkaline materials (like clam or eggshell) rather than an acid like the alum suggested by the medieval sources so I tried it all: plain iris juice for a control, and iris juice with clam shells and eggshells for alkaline as well as iris juice with aluminum sulfate, an acid.

Four jars of iris juice and different variables. Photo by Adrienne d’Evreus.

The aluminum sulfate and iris juice combination started turning a dark turquoise color. It was swirled to combine and allowed to sit undisturbed for approximately four hours. I decanted the aluminum sulfate saturated juice into a clean jar and used that solution to saturate three clean 8x10cm squares of linen. Then they were dried on a piece of parchment paper under a gentle fan protected from the cat and other disturbances. After waiting for each saturation to completely dry, this procedure was repeated five more times over several days.

Iris juice with aluminum sulfate on linen, wet and dry. Photo by Adrienne d’Evreus.

After the first experiment with fresh iris blossoms, the bag of partially exhausted blossoms was returned to the refrigerator. Several weeks later the blossoms had fermented. Intrigued by the slightly post-1600 recipe ideas that used fermented iris (Merrifield 678, 684), I used the blue liquid squeezed from them too. After letting the white slimy precipitate settle I poured the cleanest juice off for new trials. These used clam shells and eggshells with and without aluminum sulfate, as well as three linen clothlets soaked in a 10:1 aluminum sulfate solution first, which follows the original medieval recipe procedure in De Arte Illuminandi (Thompson and Hamilton 6-7). These second clothlets were only soaked three to four times because I ran out of juice. As they were soaked they had a beautiful blue-green hue. They were dried, as before, between each soaking.

Finished iris clothlets; the clothlets on the right were made with fermented iris juice. Photo by Adrienne d’Evreus.

All clothlets and jars with variables were reserved on the refrigerator away from the cat and as cleanly as possible while drying under a fan.

The trials of iris juice with the addition of aluminum sulfate, from both ‘fresh’ and fermented iris juice, in an alkaline substrate like clam shells or not, all produced green results. A small brush was used to combine distilled water, Winsor and Newton gum Arabic, and prepared pigment from iris to paint out resulting materials onto Strathmore 100lb vellum surface Bristol board.

From left to right: iris juice with aluminum sulfate from a glass jar, iris juice with aluminum sulfate from a clam shell, more-concentrated iris juice and aluminum sulfate from a glass jar, all on Bristol board. Photo by Adrienne d’Evreus.

The plain iris juice, plain iris juice in a clam shell or eggshell without aluminum sulfate resulted only in browns whether fermented or not. I was a little surprised that the juice didn’t stay blue at all by itself after drying.

Plain iris juice in a clam shell on the right; iris juice with a pinch of alum in a clam shell on the left. Photo by Adrienne d’Avreus.

There were no iris clothlets prepared without aluminum sulfate. Both fermented and non-fermented clothlets made with aluminum sulfate produced pretty green linen yielding delicate green ‘paint’ when combined with some distilled water and gum Arabic. The fermented iris juice clothlet produced a slightly more brown-green than the non-fermented. The bacteria and fungus in the fermentation process may have caused the iris green to deteriorate slightly resulting in a more brown-green than pure light green produced from the clothlet prepared with non-fermented juice.

Pigment from fresh iris juice and aluminum sulfate clothlet on the left; pigment from fermented iris juice and aluminum sulfate clothlet on the right. Photo by Adrienne d’Evreus.

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Buckthorn berries and Sap Green

In the fall it took me what felt like forever to find Rhamnus spp. berries for the sap green. I searched the fields and ditches near my house, and even went to “Buckthorn Lane” in my local neighborhood. I found other trees with other fruits but no buckthorn! Even though my dad had taught me about many plants and how to garden, he never taught me about buckthorn. Non-native invasive species were to be eradicated in his experience, not fostered or encouraged.

Finally someone said “look for tall trees, usually somewhere wet” so I went back to my stomping grounds as a teenager in Westbrook, Maine and found spindly trees with small berries in what used to be a wetland for protected turtles. “This?! Is this it?!” I begged my friends to confirm cell phone pictures of my find. The leaves looked right from the National Agricultural Library’s invasive plant website (NAL 2015) and Mistress Isabel Chamberlain’s blog (Siconolfi); the berries were dark and the bush was spindly and taller than I might have guessed, growing somewhere wet. “Yes!”, they chorused, “that looks right, try it!”

Sap green from buckthorn berries (Merrifield ccxviii) is defined by Pigment Compendium as a flavonoid dye coming from buckthorn, Rhamnus spp (Eastaugh et al. 338). De Arte Illuminandi and Original Treatises have recipes to produce it, just like the iris green. The identification of the berries and when to gather them is described in De Arte Illuminandi (Thompson and Hamilton 43) which points to Cennino Cennini for their identification (Thompson 32n). Once identified, the buckthorn berries should be combined with lye and rock alum dissolved under heat to make green (Thompson and Hamilton 7). Recipes to make the green were also found in Merrifield’s Original Treatises (420-428, 662, 706, 708-710, 786, 808). The recipes after page 640 in Merrifield’s books are from manuscripts written after the sixteenth century. They were not as interesting to me but I feel that these other sap green recipes are relevant to researchers of the earlier sources due to their material and procedural similarities.

According to De Arte Illuminandi the green from buckthorn could have been prepared and stored as clothlets, like iris, or sealed in a glass bottle (Thompson and Hamilton 7). I decided to experiment with the second method.

On September 4, 2015, 100.00g of buckthorn berries were added to a 12oz glass jelly jar and crushed with a plastic fork. They were sticky and smelled slightly winy. They ranged from almost black and squishy through reddish to green and firm.

Buckthorn berries. Photo by Adrienne d’Evreus

The recipe in De Arte Illuminandi contains lye as I previously mentioned. Lye or ley is defined in the new Dover edition as an alkaline solution made from mixing wood ashes with water (Alexander xxiii). In an online conversation with Geffrei Maudeleyne, he explained where in De Arte Illuminandi to look (Thompson and Hamilton 36-37) and Asplund confirmed that potassium carbonate, K2CO3, is what the medieval craftsmen would have made and used. Since I didn’t have the Dover edition with its glossary until Christmas 2015, I relied on the sage advice and resources of these online friends and fellow pigment makers.

In a Corning Ware sauce pan (to emulate the “glazed porriger” of De Arte Illuminandi‘s instruction) 11.60g of lye, K2CO3, was mixed with 100g of distilled water. Adding 5.05g of aluminum sulfate, Al2(SO4)3, resulted in immediate bubbling. The reactions at this point had increased the temperature a little to 80 degrees F. Warming the mixture on a simmer burner on low, I hoped to dissolve more of the alum. After about ten minutes the bubbling had mostly stopped. The temperature had risen to 120 degrees F and the solution had a pH of 6 and a milky appearance. Heating it up to encourage the aluminum sulfate to dissolve, a little mass and volume was lost by evaporation and in the sink when it was transferred into the jar with crushed berries. A little residue remained in the pan, and the total weight of the solution decreased to 87.07g. Pouring the liquid into the berries caused an immediate color change like I saw in the spring with the iris! Turquoise again!

Crushed buckthorn berries mixed with aluminum sulfate and lye. Photo by Adrienne d’Evreus.

The lye/aluminum sulfate solution was mixed into the berries with the plastic fork. The following day the solution had bubbled out of the jar a little. The jar was relocated into a glass bowl in an undisturbed corner for two more days. The third day after the addition of aluminum sulfate and lye, a clean square of cloth was used to strain the juice into another jar. The jar was capped and closed when not accessing this liquid for paint experiments. It produced another pretty green liquid! This is most likely the sap green I was hoping for.

A small brush was used to combine distilled water, Winsor and Newton gum Arabic, and prepared pigment from the buckthorn to paint out resulting materials onto Strathmore 100lb vellum surface Bristol board.

Sap green, concentrated and dilute, applied to Bristol board. Photo by Adrienne d’Evreus.

Both iris and buckthorn berries produced green pigment using the fourteenth century instructions from De Arte Illuminandi, despite using aluminum sulfate rather than potassium aluminum sulfate. Moving forward with the “correct” alum will be interesting next time. I wonder if it will produce the same green or a different one. My father would be satisfied that I made lovely green paint from the plants I grew and found using science. My science teachers would have been happier with better note taking and more pictures so I will attempt that with fresh and correct materials in 2016. There are so many colors achievable from other berries and more invasive and native plants and weeds using historic European recipes from hundreds of years ago. I can’t wait to see what else is achievable! What are you inspired to learn, experiment with, and achieve?
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References

Alexander, S. M. Glossary of Technical Terms in Medieval and Renaissance Treatises on the Arts of Painting. By Merrifield xi-xxxiv. New York: Dover, 1967.

Asplund, Randy. Personal communication on Facebook and in e-mail, 2015.

Broecke, Lara. Cennino Cennini’s Il libro dell’arte, A new English translation and commentary with Italian transcription.  London:  Archetype Publications Ltd., 2015.

Brown, Jamin. Accessed December 2015.

Brown, Michelle P. Understanding Illuminated Manuscripts: A Guide to Technical Terms (J. Paul Getty Museum: Malibu and British Library: London, 1994). 

Clarke, Mark. The Art of All Colours. London: Archetype Publications, Ltd., 2001.

Eastaugh, Nicolas, et al. Pigment Compendium A Dictionary of Historical Pigments. Boston: Elsevier, Ltd, 2008.

Feldberg, Wendy. Personal communication via blog comments and e-mail, 2015.

Maudeleyne, Geffrei. Personal communication, August 2015.

Merrifield, Mary P. Original Treatises: Dating from the XIIth to XVIIIth Centuries on the Arts of Painting, in Oil, Miniature, Mosaic, and on Glass; of Gilding, Dyeing, and the Preparation of Colours and Artificial Gems; Preceded by a General Introduction; with Translations, Prefaces, and Notes, In Two Volumes. London: John Murray, Albemarle Street, 1849. (The new Dover edition with a glossary also suggests some of her dating of the manuscripts is not correct.)

Medieval and Renaissance Treatises on the Arts of Painting, Original Texts with English Translations. New York: Dover Publications, Inc, 1967, 1999.

National Agricultural Library. Accessed September 2015.

Siconolfi, Claire. Accessed September 2015.

Smith, Cyril Stanley and Hawthorne, Daniel G. Transactions of the American Philosophical Society held at Philidelphia for promoting useful knowledge. New series Volume 64, part 4. Mappae Clavicula, a little key to the world of medieval techniques. 1974.

Thompson, Daniel V. The Craftsman’s Handbook. “Il Libro dell’Arte”. New York: Dover Publications, Inc, 1960.

Thompson, Daniel V. The Materials and Techniques of Medieval Painting. New York: Dover Publications, 1956.

Thompson, Daniel Varney and Hamilton, George Hurd. De Arte Illuminandi, the Technique of Manuscript Illumination. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1933.
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Filed under: A&S Research Papers, Arts and Sciences Tagged: a&s, Arts and Sciences

Crowning a Princess

Sun, 2016-05-01 17:01

Yesterday in Tir Mara, Duke Brion Anthony Uriel Tarragon won the right to make his consort, Duchess Anna Ophelia Holloway Tarragon, Princess of the Eastern Kingdom.  He first made her a princess just over thirty years ago, and they ruled as the 34th Crowns of the Kingdom of Atenveldt.  They have twice before ruled as King and Queen of the East.

The Gazette thanks Sir Simon Gwyn for the use of his photos.

 

 


Filed under: Court Tagged: Crown Tournament

The New Prince and Princess of the East!

Sat, 2016-04-30 16:27

Duke Brion Anthony Uriel Tarragon defeated Sir Wilhelm von Ostenbruck to become the Prince of the East, and Duchess Anna Ophelia Holloway Tarragon is now Princess of the East.

Many thanks to Mistress Ygraine of Kellswood and Mistress Tadea Isabetta di Bruno for all of the on-site reporting!


Filed under: Uncategorized Tagged: Crown Tournament, spring crown

Crown Tourney – Finals / Les Finalistes du Tournoi de la Couronne

Sat, 2016-04-30 15:48

The finals will be best of 5 with rotating weapon forms.

En Français:

Celle-ci sera déterminée de la même façon que les demi-finales.

Duke Brion Anthony Uriel Tarragon for the honor of Duchess Anna Ophelia Holloway Tarragon

versus

Sir Wilhelm von Ostenbrucke fighting for the honour of Mistress Vienna de la Mer


Filed under: Heavy List Tagged: Crown Tournament, spring crown

Crown Tourney – Semi Finals / Demi-Finales du Tournoi de la Couronne

Sat, 2016-04-30 15:11

The four combatants remaining in the tournament are as follows. Five wins will be required to advance. This means an undefeated fighter will need two wins; a fighter who has already lost a bout will need three wins.

Duke Brion and Sir Ivan need two wins, Duke Randal and Sir Wilhelm need three.

En français: Les quatre combattants restants dans le tournoi sont listés ci-dessous. Cinq victoires seront nécessaires pour avancer à la prochaine étape. Ceci veut dire qu’un combattant n’ayant subi aucune défaite devra obtenir deux victoires, tandis qu’un combattant ayant déjà subi une défaite devra obtenir trois victoires pour progresser

Duke Brion Anthony Uriel Tarragon for the honor of Duchess Anna Ophelia Holloway Tarragon

versus

Duke Randal of the Dark for the honor of Duchess Katherine Stanhope

and

Sir Ivan Ivanov syn Dimitriov vynuk Tzardikov fighting for the honour of Baroness Matilde de Cadenet.

versus

Sir Wilhelm von Ostenbrucke fighting for the honour of Mistress Vienna de la Mer


Filed under: Heavy List Tagged: Crown Tournament

Crown Tourney – Final Eight / Les Huit Finalistes du Tournoi de la Couronne

Sat, 2016-04-30 14:52

The field has been narrowed to the remaining combatants.

En français

Le champ de bataille a été réduit aux participants suivants.

Duke Brion Anthony Uriel Tarragon for the honor of Duchess Anna Ophelia Holloway Tarragon

Duke Randal of the Dark for the honor of Duchess Katherine Stanhope

Sir Ivan Ivanov syn Dimitriov vynuk Tzardikov fighting for the honour of Baroness Matilde de Cadenet.

Sir Wilhelm von Ostenbrucke fighting for the honour of Mistress Vienna de la Mer.

Baron Matthias Grunwald fighting for the honour of Baroness Æsa feilinn Jossursdottir.

Baron Sigurthr VigurHafn fighting for the honour of Baroness Medhbh inghean Cheallaigh.

Baron Tiberius Nautius Maximus fighting for the honour of Maeve of Linne Tatha.

Sir Marcus Blackaert fighting for the honour of Baroness Astrid Sigrun Ulfkelsdottir.


Filed under: Events, Heavy List Tagged: Crown Tournament, spring crown

Crown Tourney Sweet Sixteen/ Les seize Finalistes du Tournoi de la Couronne

Sat, 2016-04-30 14:22

Having completed the early rounds of competition, there are now sixteen competitors left.  They are as follows:

En français: Après les premières rondes de compétition, il reste maintenant seize participants. Ceux-ci sont:

Duke Brion Anthony Uriel Tarragon for the honor of Duchess Anna Ophelia Holloway Tarragon

Duke Randal of the Dark for the honor of Duchess Katherine Stanhope

Peter de Bracebridge fighting for the honour of Lady Gaeira Aggadottir.

Baron Matthias Grunwald fighting for the honour of Baroness Æsa feilinn Jossursdottir.

Jarl Valgard Stonecleaver fighting for the honour of Lady Gracia Vasquez de Trillo.

Sir Ivan Ivanov syn Dimitriov vynuk Tzardikov fighting for the honour of Baroness Matilde de Cadenet.

Master Tiberius Iulius Rufus Primus fighting for the honour of Vopiscus Rufius Donatus.

Sir Marcus Blackaert fighting for the honour of Baroness Astrid Sigrun Ulfkelsdottir.

Renaud Mauclerc du Dragon Dormant fighting for the honour of Léana Doucet

Sir Wilhelm von Ostenbrucke fighting for the honour of Mistress Vienna de la Mer.

Sir Simon Gwyn fighting for the honour of Lady Tullia Tranquilla.

Sir Rhys Ravenscroft fighting for the honour of Vicondesa Jimena Montoya.

Baron Tiberius Nautius Maximus fighting for the honour of Maeve of Linne Tatha.

Baron Sigurthr VigurHafn fighting for the honour of Baroness Medhbh inghean Cheallaigh.

Sir Ané du Vey fighting for the honour of Mistress Sylvia de Vey.

Lord Ulfgeirr Ragnarsson the Nice fighting for the honour of Lady Lavina Attewode.

EDIT: The original version of this post had Lord William Ravenhair advancing, instead of Sir Wilhelm von Ostenbrucke. This was due to a transcription error, and we apologize for the confusion.


Filed under: Events, Heavy List Tagged: Crown Tournament, spring crown

Crown Tourney Begins

Sat, 2016-04-30 12:37

The fighters and their consorts process in. Photo by Ygraine Kellswood.

With 23 fighters vying for the right of the Eastern Crown, the Tournament is beginning. The two lists are as follows:

Queen’s List

  •  Duke Randal of the Dark fighting for the honour of Duchess Katherine Stanhope.
  •  Sir Wilhelm von Ostenbrucke fighting for the honour of Mistress Vienna de la Mer.
  •  Sir Marcus Blackaert fighting for the honour of Baroness Astrid Sigrun Ulfkelsdottir.
  • Sir Ané du Vey fighting for the honour of Mistress Sylvia de Vey.
  • Lord William RavenHair fighting for the honour of Lady Ceara Inghean Eoin Mhic Lucais.
  • Baron Matthias Grunwald fighting for the honour of Baroness Æsa feilinn Jossursdottir.
  • Lord Ulfgeirr Ragnarsson the Nice fighting for the honour of Lady Lavina Attewode.
  •  Master Tiberius Iulius Rufus Primus fighting for the honour of Vopiscus Rufius Donatus.
  • Lord Gawyn O’Clery fighting for the honour of Maeve O’Clery.
  • Baron Fionn Mac Con Dhuibh fighting for the honour of Baroness Molly Schofield.
  • Peter de Bracebridge fighting for the honour of Lady Gaeira Aggadottir.

King’s List

  • Duke Brion Anthony Uriel Tarragon fighting for the honour of Duchess Anna Ophelia Holloway Tarragon.
  •  Jarl Valgard Stonecleaver fighting for the honour of Lady Gracia Vasquez de Trillo.
  •  Sir Rhys Ravenscroft fighting for the honour of Vicondesa Jimena Montoya.
  •  Master Æthelhawk Keyfinder fighting for the honour of Mistress Siubhan Wallace.
  •  Sir Ivan Ivanov syn Dimitriov vynuk Tzardikov fighting for the honour of Baroness Matilde de Cadenet.
  • Sir Simon Gwyn fighting for the honour of Lady Tullia Tranquilla.
  • Baron Sigurthr VigurHafn fighting for the honour of Baroness Medhbh inghean Cheallaigh.
  • Baron Duncan Kerr fighting for the honour of Mistress Eleanor fitzPatrick.
  • Lord Ryouko’jin of Iron-skies fighting for the honour of Lady Indrakshi Aravinda.
  • Baron Tiberius Nautius Maximus fighting for the honour of Maeve of Linne Tatha.
  • Lord Corwin Blackthorn fighting for the honour of Lady Solveig Bjornsdottr.
  • Renaud Mauclerc du Dragon Dormant fighting for the honour of Léana Doucet

Many thanks to Ygraine Kellswood for her reporting. Any errors made are the Gazette’s editing.

 


Filed under: Heavy List Tagged: Crown Tournament

Eastern Results on the February 2016 LoAR

Fri, 2016-04-29 02:11

The Society College of Heralds runs on monthly cycles and letters. Each month, the College processes name and armory submissions from all of the Kingdoms. Final decisions on submissions are made at the monthly meetings of the Pelican Queen of Arms (names) and the Wreath Queen of Arms (armory). Pelican and Wreath then write up their decisions in a Letter of Acceptances and Return (LoAR). After review and proofreading, LoARs generally are released two months after the meeting where the decisions are made.

 

An “acceptance” indicates that the item(s) listed are now registered with the Society. A “return” indicates that the item is returned to the submitter for additional work. Most items are registered without comments. Sometimes, the LoAR will address specific issues about the name or armory or will praise the submitter/herald on putting together a very nice historically accurate item.

The following results are from the February 2016 Wreath and Pelican meetings; these items were submitted to the East Kingdom at Pennsic 2015.

EAST acceptances

Áine ingen Fháeláin. Name change from Sadb ingen Fháeláin and device. Per fess embattled vert and argent, two wolves rampant counterchanged. The byname ingen Fháeláin is grandfathered to the submitter.

This name does not conflict with the registered name Eithne ingen Fháeláin. The initial syllable has been substantially changed in both sound and appearance, so this name is clear under PN3C2 of SENA.

The submitters previous name, Sadb ingen Fháeláin, is released.

Alexandra Jacobsdochter. Device. Gules, on an escallop argent a tulip gules.

Alexandra Jacobsdochter. Badge. (Fieldless) On an escallop argent a tulip gules.

Alton Hewes. Name (see RETURNS for device). Alton is the submitters legal middle name. It is also an attested English surname dated to 1508, so the submitter need not rely on the legal name allowance. Nice 16th century English name!

Anna Vitalis. Name and device. Per chevron argent and Or, two axes gules and a tree vert. The submitter requested authenticity for Italian – for any time in our period.This name is authentic for 16th century Italy, and is probably authentic for the 14th century as well. Please advise the submitter to draw the per chevron line higher so that it separates the field in two more equal portions.

Aodhan of Coldwood. Name and device. Argent, an anvil between three feathers bendwise sinister and two hammers in saltire, a bordure embattled sable. Coldwood is the registered name of an SCA branch.

Ástriðr Læknir. Device. Per pale wavy purpure and argent, a falcon belled and jessed and a rose slipped and leaved counterchanged.

Bernhardt Kröuwel. Name and device. Or, a chevron between a bear's head cabossed sable and a fleur-de- lys purpure. The submitter requested authenticity for a German name. Both elements are German and the given name was documented to the late 15th century. The byname, however, was documented to the 12th-13th century. Therefore the name is not authentic for a specific time, but it is registerable. The submitter may wish to know that an authentic 12th century form of this name is Bernhart

Kröuwel. Bernhart is found in Socin, citing the Rotulus Sanpetrinus. If the submitter prefers this form, he can submit a request for reconsideration.

 

Bjorn av Åttsidenfjord. Reblazon of device. Gyronny gules and sable, a bears head couped argent, a bordure argent crusily formy fitchy sable. Blazoned when registered in August 1984 as Gyronny gules and sable, a bears head couped within a bordure argent charged with eight crosses patty fitchy sable, we no longer use the term patty, as it is ambiguous.

 

Bótfríðr í eplagarði. Name and device. Or, a phoenix gules rising from flames azure and in canton a heart sable.

Bran Finn mac Aeda. Name. Nice 6th century Irish Gaelic name!

Caitríona bean mhic Cailín. Name.

Carolingia, Barony of. Guild name Carolingian Company of Calivers and badge. Azure, a pall wavy and in chief an eagle Or. The pattern of using Carolingian as part of the designator is grandfathered to the barony. A caliver is a type of musket or harquebus, and is a plausible heraldic charge. Please advise the submitter to draw visible feet on the eagle.

Chiba Touta Yoshitake. Name and device. Argent, three hexagons one and two within an octagon voided sable. There is a step from period practice for the use of hexagons.

Christoph of Marwick. Name. Marwick is the registered name of an SCA branch.

Clovia Drusa. Name (see RETURNS for device). Nice Roman name!

Conrad von Altmark. Reblazon of device. Per bend gules and sable, an eagle and on a chief Or three crosses formy sable.Blazoned when registered in July 1984 as Per bend gules and sable, an eagle displayed, wings inverted, and on a chief Or, three crosses patty sable, we no longer use the ambiguous term patty.

 

Daffydd ap Owen de Caledon. Badge. Or, a pall inverted purpure between two maunches addorsed gules and a Bowen knot azure.

East, Kingdom of the. Reblazon of badge for Cooks Guild. Sable, on a chalice argent a cross formy gules. Blazoned when registered in January 1974 as Sable, on a chalice argent a cross patty gules, we no longer use the ambiguous term patty.

 

East, Kingdom of the. Badge for Order of the Golden Lance of the East. Per fess azure and Or, a tilting lance fesswise and a tyger courant counterchanged.

Fearghus mac Cailín. Name.

Giuliana Malipiero. Name and device. Vert, a flamingo maintaining in its foot a sword Or, abase engrailed argent.

Hala bint Hasanah. Name and device. Erminois, an elephant statant purpure and in dexter a rose gules slipped and leaved vert.

 

Heinreich Wächter. Badge. Sable, two dunghill cocks rousant respectant and in chief a mullet of eight points argent.

 

Innes Barclay. Device change. Argent, three tortoises in pall tails to center vert. The submitters old device, Argent, three tortoises in pall tails to center vert within a bordure azure, is released.

 

Isabel del Okes. Name and device. Vert, two compass stars and an oak leaf Or. Both the given name and byname are found in England in 1379, making this an excellent 14th century English name! There is a step from period practice for the use of compass stars.

 

Katherine Morgan of Woolpit. Name and device. Vert, a lute bendwise sinister, a bordure argent.

Woolpit is a lingua Anglica form of the period English Uulfpet (c.1095) and Wulpet (1610).

Ketilríðr Brúnadóttir. Name change from Caitríona MacLeod of Kilchoan and device change. Argent, three domestic cats couchant vert. The submitters previous name, Caitríona MacLeod of Kilchoan, is released. The submitters old device, Per chevron vert semy of bees proper and argent, in base a wooden spoon proper, is released.

 

Kolfinna Johansdottir. Name and device. Gules, a pegasus segreant and on a chief Or three mullets azure.

 

Lucius Plotius Primus. Name and device. Or, in pale a lotus flower affronty purpure and a mountain issuant from base sable.

 

Mór Cille Caindigh. Name and device. Gules, a bend counterermine fimbriated between an owl and a wolf rampant argent.

 

Submitted as Mór of Kilkenny, the name was changed in kingdom to Mór Cill Caindigh because the submitter requested a wholly Gaelic locative byname instead of the Anglicized Irish of Kilkenny. The byname must be in the genitive (possessive) form. We have changed the byname to Cille Caindigh in order to register this name. We note that lenition of such bynames is inconsistent in the Irish Annals, so we have not lenited the byname.

 

Nathaniel Wyatt. Device. Per fess azure and Or, a fess indented lozengy Or and azure between two rapiers inverted in saltire Or and a griffon azure.

 

Pipa Blackwood. Device. Per pale Or and argent, a fox statant azure charged on the shoulder with a mullet of six points argent.

 

Raoul le Menestrel. Name. Nice late 13th century French name!

 

Skúli Ingvarsson. Name and device. Erminois, in pale a monkey gules riding a pig statant sable, a chief vert.

 

Thyephaine de Lyon. Name (see RETURNS for device).

 

EAST returns

 

Alton Hewes. Device. Per pale azure and sable, a cockatrice erect argent.

 

This lovely device is returned for conflict with the device of Genevieve de Lyonesse: Per saltire azure and sable, a cockatrice statant argent. There is a DC for the field, but no DC for posture between this cockatrice and Genevieves cockatrice.

 

Clovia Drusa. Device. Per bend sinister azure and purpure, a human breast distilling milk argent and a maiden statant affronty proper crined sable vested Or charged with and maintaining a nude infant fesswise proper.

In the defining registration of the human breast, it was ruled: A human breast is an allowed charge that has one clear difference (CD) from a roundel. It must have gouttes, and the gouttes must be visible. This means that they need some contrast with the breast but need not have good contrast. [Tetchubah of Greenlake, LoAR of Jan 2008] This submission does not meet those requirements as the gouttes are not visible: they have zero contrast with the breast, and the charge is now indistinguishable from a roundel argent. Additionally, the infant is effectively a tertiary charge on the woman and as such it has insufficient contrast against the Or dress.

 

Thyephaine de Lyon. Device. Argent chaussé checky purpure and argent, a dragonfly purpure. This device is returned for conflict with the badge of the College of Windreach: (Fieldless) A dragonfly purpure. There is only one DC for fieldless versus fielded design.


Filed under: Heraldry

Plan to Visit Artisans’ Village This Summer

Thu, 2016-04-28 08:36

Photo from a previous Artisans Village event. Period brewing over an open fire, led by Lord Alexander Makcristyne

The following information is courtesy of Mistress Elysabeth Underhill.

Greetings! Artisans’ Village will take place on June 3-5 in the Shire of Hartshorn-dale. This event is dedicated entirely to Arts and Sciences activities.

We have nine villages that will be demonstrating their arts throughout the day, many with hands on activities: Cooking; Music & Dance; Brewing; Woodworking; Metalworking; Lampworking; Embroidery & Fiber; Paper, Book, and Scribal; and Science!

We will have over 12 classes throughout the day, including bobbin lace, naalbinding, papermaking, block printing, chain maille, and classes on writing documentation, and A&S competitions.

Finally, we have a list of 13 Artisans’ Challenges available on our website to encourage you to try something new or increase your skills.

To learn more about this event, please read the EK Gazette’s event profile of last year’s Artisans Village.

We hope to see you there!

Event Website: http://www.hartshorn-dale.org/village/challenges.htm

EK Calendar Announcement: http://www.eastkingdom.org/EventDetails.php?eid=2923

Thanks to the East Kingdom University for their support of this event!

 


Filed under: Announcements, Events Tagged: events

Unofficial Court Report: Smoking Rocks 40th Anniversary Celebration

Wed, 2016-04-27 18:04

Though the day started overcast with a bit of rain, there was naught but comradery and lightheartedness to be found among the attendees of the Barony of Smoking Rocks 40th Anniversary Celebration, held on the 23rd of April, Anno Societatis 50, reckoned 2016 in the Common Era. The day’s revels were attended by Their Majesties Kenric III and Avelina III. In mid-afternoon, upon completion of the rapier and armoured tourneys and the arts and sciences competition, Their Majesties opened Court. They invited Their Excellencies Smoking Rocks join Them and to conduct what business they had in Baronial Court. Smoking Rocks Court concluded, Their Majesties resumed Their own Royal Court.

First to speak to the King was Ceawlin Alreding, Baron of Smoking Rocks. Baron Ceawlin recalled a time in the past when a faithful family retainer named Kenric had served as his cupbearer. At the time, Baron Ceawlin had promised his retainer a ha’penny at Christmastide. Kenric’s fortunes now much changed, His Excellency still wished to fulfill his debt and presented His Majesty with his ha’penny and his thanks.

Their Majesties called for Ysabella de Coventry and spoke of her service to thrown weapons and archery. They wished to pass on the appreciation of her work by Their predecessors, Omega V and Etheldreda IV, and gave her a scroll Awarding her Arms from the 22nd of August, A.S. 50, 2015 C.E. at the Equestrian and Thrown Weapons Championships. The scroll was prepared by Lady Aaradyn Ghyoot.

The Crown then called for the children of the East and offered them toys from the Kingdom’s coffers, if they could catch Ulf the Dragon Slayer. Ulf ran out of Court with the box, followed by a dozen children and much joyful cheering.

King Kenric and Queen Avelina called for Lasair an Fhraoich and spoke of her tablet weaving and work on the inkle loom. They called for Their Order of the Silver Brooch and made Lasair a member of that Order, with a scroll to commemorate that crafted by Lord Vettorio Antonello.

Their Majesties called for those new to the Society and several people approached. Their Majesties offered them tokens of appreciation and thanked them for participating.

Lord Haakon Ragnarsson was summoned before the Crown and praised his work as an anchor of his shield wall. They called for Their Order of the Silver Tyger and caused Haakon to be numbered among them, with a scroll saying such prepared by Lady Onora inghean ui Rauic. Their Majesties felt Their Order of the Silver Tyger incomplete and called for Baron Bruka the Saracen. King Kenric praised his work in the shield wall and his skill with pole arm, and named Bruka to the Order with a scroll prepared by Mistress Nest verch Tangwistel. Mistress Nest verch Tangwhistle then approached the thrones in her role as Tyger Clerk of the Signet and swore fealty, and was given fealty in return by the Crown.

The Crown called for Lady Marguerite von Elfenau. They spoke of her work as a chonicler, her musicianship with Fracta Modi, and how she opens her house for project days and newcomer get togethers. They called for Their Order of the Silver Wheel and caused Marguerite to be counted as one of that Order. She was presented with a framed piece of stained glass crafted by Lady Solskinn of Smoking Rocks with words by Mistress Nest verch Tangwistle.

Their Majesties then spoke of the polling that had recently been conducted in the Barony of Smoking Rocks in its search to find successors to Baron Ceawlin Alreding and Baroness Molly Blythe. Their Majesties announced that they had found the heirs to the Baronial Seat and called for Lord Richard Leviathan and Lady Alys Attewater and bade them plan for their Investiture. Queen Avelina then thanked the Barony and the event steward for a wonderful day and offered her expectations for a wonderful feast.

Before the Court of Their Majesties could be closed, Master Padraig Dubh MacEanruig, who had been made a member of the Order of Chivalry twenty years prior, came forward and asked if Their Majesties would accept his fealty. King Kenric said he would much rather have Master Pat at his side than opposing him and so accepted his offered fealty and gave him the fealty of the Crown in return.

There being no further business, the Court of Kenric III and Avelina III at Smoking Rocks 40th Anniversary was concluded. My thanks to the heralds – Mistress Suba al-Hadid, Lady Amy verch Rychard, Lord Agapios Cargos, and Justinius Alexander Eternus – and all the retainers and scribes and others who supported the Crown and the event.

For Crown and College, Pray know I remain, – Master Rowen Cloteworthy


Filed under: Court Tagged: court report

Crown Tournament – What To Expect / Déroulement du Tournois de la Couronne

Tue, 2016-04-26 17:04

King Kenric crowns Queen Avelina at an earlier Crown Tournament.

En Français

This Saturday the Gazette will provide limited coverage from the East Kingdom’s Spring Crown Tournament. The tourney format as well as the fighters with their consorts are listed below.  Due to the limitations of the site, the Gazette anticipates that our coverage will not start until the semi-finals.

Format

The format for Crown Tourney will be a pooled round robin leading into a 16-man double elimination tournament. The weapons used will be the choice of the fighters until they reach the semi-finals. The winner of the semi-final bouts will be determined by who wins the best of 5 and rotating weapon forms will be used. The undefeated fighter will enter the finals with 1 win to their credit. The finals will be best of 5 with rotating weapon forms.

Entrants

  • Duke Brion Anthony Uriel Tarragon fighting for the honour of Duchess Anna Ophelia Holloway Tarragon.
  •  Duke Randal of the Dark fighting for the honour of Duchess Katherine Stanhope.
  •  Jarl Valgard Stonecleaver fighting for the honour of Lady Gracia Vasquez de Trillo.
  •  Sir Wilhelm von Ostenbrucke fighting for the honour of Mistress Vienna de la Mer.
  •  Sir Rhys Ravenscroft fighting for the honour of Vicondesa Jimena Montoya.
  •  Sir Marcus Blackaert fighting for the honour of Baroness Astrid Sigrun Ulfkelsdottir.
  •  Sir Cedric of Armorica fighting for the honour of Mistress Brid nic Shearlais.
  •  Master Æthelhawk Keyfinder fighting for the honour of Mistress Siubhan Wallace.
  •  Master Tiberius Iulius Rufus Primus fighting for the honour of Vopiscus Rufius Donatus.
  •  Sir Ivan Ivanov syn Dimitriov vynuk Tzardikov fighting for the honour of Baroness Matilde de Cadenet.
  • Sir Ané du Vey fighting for the honour of Mistress Sylvia de Vey.
  • Sir Simon Gwyn fighting for the honour of Lady Tullia Tranquilla.
  • Lord William RavenHair fighting for the honour of Lady Ceara Inghean Eoin Mhic Lucais.
  • Baron Sigurthr VigurHafn fighting for the honour of Baroness Medhbh inghean Cheallaigh.
  • Baron Duncan Kerr fighting for the honour of Mistress Eleanor fitzPatrick.
  • Baron Matthias Grunwald fighting for the honour of Baroness Æsa feilinn Jossursdottir.
  • Lord Ryouko’jin of Iron-skies fighting for the honour of Lady Indrakshi Aravinda.
  • Lord Ulfgeirr Ragnarsson the Nice fighting for the honour of Lady Lavina Attewode.
  • Baron Tiberius Nautius Maximus fighting for the honour of Maeve of Linne Tatha.
  • Baron Fionn Mac Con Dhuibh fighting for the honour of Baroness Molly Schofield.
  • Lord Gawyn O’Clery fighting for the honour of Maeve O’Clery.
  • Lord Corwin Blackthorn fighting for the honour of Lady Solveig Bjornsdottr.
  • Peter de Bracebridge fighting for the honour of Lady Gaeira Aggadottir.
  • Renaud Mauclerc du Dragon Dormant fighting for the honour of Léana Doucet

En Français:  Traduction par Boyarinia Ekaterina Solov’eva Pevtsova

Ce samedi, la Gazette du Royaume de L’Est offrira une couverture limitée du Tournois printanier de la Couronne du Royaume de l’Est. Le format du Tournoi ainsi que la liste des combattants et leurs consorts se trouvent ci-dessous. La couverture du Tournoi par la Gazette ne débutera que pour les demi-finales, l’accès à internet à partir du site étant limité.

Format :

Les rondes se dérouleront jusqu’à ce qu’on atteigne 16 combattants, par double élimination. Les armes seront au choix des combattants jusqu’aux demi-finales. Le gagnant de la demi-finale sera déterminé dans un meilleur de 5 avec des armes différentes à chaque rencontre. Le champion qui n’aura aucune défaite arrivera en finale avec un avantage de 1 point dans la finale. Celle-ci sera déterminée de la même façon que les demi-finales.

Combattants :

• Duc Brion Anthony Uriel Tarragon combattra pour l’honneur de la Duchesse Anna Ophelia Holloway Tarragon.

• Duc Randal of the Dark combattra pour l’honneur de la Duchesse Katherine Stanhope.

• Jarl Valgard Stonecleaver combattra pour l’honneur de Dame Gracia Vasquez de Trillo.

• Sir Wilhelm von Ostenbrucke combattra pour l’honneur de Maitresse Vienna de la Mer.

• Sir Rhys Ravenscroft combattra pour l’honneur de la Vicomtesse Jimena Montoya.

• Sir Marcus Blackaert combattra pour l’honneur de la Baronne Astrid Sigrun Ulfkelsdottir.

• Sir Cedric of Armorica combattra pour l’honneur de Maitresse Brid nic Shearlais.

• Maitre Æthelhawk Keyfinder combattra pour l’honneur de Maitresse Siubhan Wallace.

• Maitre Tiberius Iulius Rufus Primus combattra pour l’honneur de Vopiscus Rufius Donatus.

• Sir Ivan Ivanov syn Dimitriov vynuk Tzardikov combattra pour l’honneur de la Baronne Matilde de Cadenet.

• Sir Ané du Vey combattra pour l’honneur de Maitresse Sylvia de Vey.

• Sir Simon Gwyn combattra pour l’honneur de Dame Tullia Tranquilla.

• Lord William RavenHair combattra pour l’honneur de Dame Ceara Inghean Eoin Mhic Lucais.

• Baron Sigurthr VigurHafn combattra pour l’honneur de la Baronne Medhbh inghean Cheallaigh.

• Baron Duncan Kerr combattra pour l’honneur de Maitresse Eleanor fitzPatrick.

• Baron Matthias Grunwald combattra pour l’honneur de la Baronne Æsa feilinn Jossursdottir.

• Lord Ryouko’jin of Iron-skies combattra pour l’honneur de Dame Indrakshi Aravinda.

• Lord Ulfgeirr Ragnarsson the Nice combattra pour l’honneur de Dame Lavina Attewode.

• Baron Tiberius Nautius Maximus combattra pour l’honneur de Maeve of Linne Tatha.

• Baron Fionn Mac Con Dhuibh combattra pour l’honneur de la Baronne Molly Schofield.

• Lord Gawyn O’Clery combattra pour l’honneur de Maeve O’Clery.

• Lord Corwin Blackthorn combattra pour l’honneur de Dame Solveig Bjornsdottr.

• Peter de Bracebridge combattra pour l’honneur de Dame Gaeira Aggadottir.

• Renaud Mauclerc du Dragon Dormant combattra pour l’honneur de Léana Doucet


Filed under: En français, Uncategorized

Crown Tourney Update: Conditions North of the Wall

Mon, 2016-04-25 22:46

Photo of Crown Tourney site on April 24

On behalf of Al-Faris Mohammad, autocrat of Spring Crown Tourney

As the noble populace of the East prepare for their journey to the northern reaches of the Kingdom, we would take a moment to remind everyone to bring sturdy footwear and warm clothes to Crown Tourney this weekend.  We currently expect a beautiful sunny day in the low 50 range. (11 degrees for those wishing the Celsius equivalent).  There may be some muddy patches and small banks of snow, but the majority of the site should be dry and free of the grasp off winter.

Photo of Crown Tourney Site on April 16

There were visits to the site both April 16 and 24, and as you can see by pictures, one week does make a big difference.  However, please ensure you are prepared for the elements.  The Inn in heated but Court is planned to be outdoors.  We look forward to seeing everyone soon.

In Service,

Mistress Tadea Isabetta di Bruno

 


Filed under: Events Tagged: Crown

Call for Applicants – Vice President for Information Technology

Mon, 2016-04-25 12:57

The SCA Inc. seeks applicants for the position of Vice President for Information Technology, for a three-year term beginning October 22, 2016.  This is a part-time volunteer position requiring technical leadership and a commitment of approximately 10-15 hours per week plus availability for emergencies.  The position is reports directly to the President and indirectly to the Vice President of Operations and to the Board of Directors by way of an Ombudsman.

The Vice President for Information Technology (VPIT) leads a team of volunteers who maintain and manage the SCA’s Internet servers for web, email, and related infrastructure services.  The VPIT team manages the SCA’s Internet domains, SSL certificates, the technical aspects of e-commerce clearinghouse services, and similar aspects of the corporation’s online identity.   The VPIT may also lead and direct external paid contractors for specific business critical projects or administrative duties.
Applications for the office will be accepted through July 1, 2016.  Please send both an SCA and modern resume to resumes@sca.org.
Comments are strongly encouraged and can be sent to:
SCA Inc.
Box 360789
Milpitas,  CA 95036

You may also email comments@lists.sca.org.

This announcement is an official informational release by the Society for Creative Anachronism , Inc.  Permission is granted to reproduce this announcement in its entirety in newsletters, websites and electronic mailing lists.


Filed under: Corporate, Uncategorized

Sad Tiding from Æthelmearc

Sun, 2016-04-24 18:48

We are saddened to report the passing of a former citizen of the East Kingdom, Mistress Esperanza Halevi (mka Esther Tucker) in the Barony-Marche of the Debatable Lands on April 11, 2016.   A detailed memorial article has been published by the Aethelmearc Gazette here: Sad Tidings: Mistress Esperanza Halevi


Filed under: Tidings

From Laurel: Applications for Pelican Sovereign of Arms

Sun, 2016-04-24 11:09

Dame Lillia, Pelican Queen of Arms, is nearing the end of her tenure, which officially ends January 1, 2017. We are beginning the process of seeking a successor for her office. If you are interested, please see the job description below and send a letter of interest and your resumé to bids@heraldry.sca.org and resumes@sca.org by Saturday, June 30, 2016.

 

If you have questions about the job, please contact Lillia at pelican@heraldry.sca.org or myself at laurel@heraldry.sca.org. Dame Lillia will be available at KWHSS 2016 for questions about the job.

 

Pelican Sovereign of Arms

The Pelican Sovereign of Arms is an educational deputy of the Laurel Principal Sovereign of Arms, responsible for the consideration of and decisions concerning names submitted for registration by the College of Arms.

 

Pelican is an unpaid position, currently requiring approximately 20 hours a week. The position requires considerable tact and patience, onomastic knowledge, research and reasoning ability, a clear understanding of the Standards for Evaluation and past Laurel rulings, the ability to write clearly and succinctly, the ability to work within tight deadlines and coordinate closely with Wreath, Laurel and other staff to produce a Laurel Letter of Acceptance and Return monthly, computer literacy and word processing skills, reliable e-mail and telephone access, and time and ability to travel. Access to a good research library is desirable but not required. Given the current structure of the office, a high-speed internet connection is useful but it is not required.

 

Resumés must be sent in both hard copy to Laurel at the address at the top of this Cover Letter and electronically to bids@heraldry.sca.org and resumes@sca.org.

 

The electronic applications will be posted on OSCAR with addresses and other contact information stripped from them. Resumés must be received by June 30, 2016 with an expected start date following Pennsic 2016.
Comments are strongly encouraged and can be sent to:
SCA Inc.
Box 360789
Milpitas,  CA 95036

You may also email comments@lists.sca.org.

This announcement is an official informational release by the Society for Creative Anachronism , Inc.  Permission is granted to reproduce this announcement in its entirety in newsletters, websites and electronic mailing lists.


Filed under: Heraldry, Official Notices Tagged: heraldry, Laurel Sovereign of Arms

Pikestaff needs Cover Artwork

Sun, 2016-04-24 10:12

We are looking for artwork to grace the cover of upcoming issues of Pikestaff. Any medium that can be reproduced in black and white is acceptable. Size requirement is 7.5″ x 10″. You can include text or it can be added later.

Please contact the East Kingdom Chronicler at chronicler@eastkingdom.org If you are a new or emerging artist, please don’t be shy. We welcome an opportunity to share work by all the artisans in the East Kingdom.
YiS,

Lady Isabel de Roys

East Kingdom Chronicler


Filed under: Announcements Tagged: Pikestaff

New SCA Society President

Sat, 2016-04-23 22:41

After many years of service, Leslie Vaughn (Baronessa Isabeau della Farfalla) will step down as President of the SCA.  John Fulton (Duke John the Bearkiller) will replace her as President.


Filed under: Corporate

Addendum to Grand Council Announcement

Sat, 2016-04-23 22:33

Earlier today the SCA Inc. announced the disbanding of the Grand Council.  The following additional information has been released.  “Society President John Fulton, Director Richard Sherman, and Director Andrew Coleman have been directed to investigate the creation of a new vehicle to facilitate communication between the membership and the directors that recognizes and utilizes the changes in technology, demographics and culture that have changed the way the Society conducts business in the 22 years since creation of the Grand Council.”  The announcement can be found on the SCA website here.


Filed under: Corporate

SCA Grand Council Disbanded

Sat, 2016-04-23 17:41

This announcement was posted on the SCA’s webpage and can be found here.

The Grand Council was formed in 1994; a time before email and social media.  There was a need then for a committee that made sure that the membership had a way to communicate with the directors on issues of importance to the SCA.  Twenty years later, members have access to the Internet and with it direct lines of communication to the directors and Corporate officers.  We know we still have problems receiving input from, and transmitting information to, the membership; but we don’t think an intermediary body provides us with the solution to these problems today.

So with thanks for the long and faithful service of the Grand Council, we have decided to disband the committee and work on new methods and approaches for increasing our responsiveness to the members of the SCA.

Board of Directors, SCA Inc


Filed under: Corporate