SCA news sites

In Memoriam: Baron Olaf of Trollheimsfjord

East Kingdom Gazette - Sat, 2016-01-23 22:01

We are saddened to report that Baron Olaf of Trollheimsfjord, known in the modern world as James Michael Revells, passed away very suddenly on January 9.  He was 61. Baron Olaf was a long-time resident of the Barony of Stonemarche, but had moved south to Atlantia to be near his family last fall.  He is survived by two daughters, two brothers, and three grandchildren.

His daughters chose to honor the importance of the SCA in his life by dressing him in his finest garb, including his coronet, for the funeral service. After the funeral his remains were cremated, that being the closest our modern age offers to the traditional Viking ship burial.

Baron Olaf of Trollheimsfjord at Market Day at Birka. Photo courtesy of Hlafidge Arastorm the Golden.

Olaf was a long-time participant in the SCA, receiving his Award of Arms in 1989. He leaves behind a lasting legacy in many ways – in long-running events he was instrumental in starting, in the children of friends in the Society who grew up thinking of him as Uncle Olaf, and in artisans who learned from him, and went on to become respected practitioners of the arts he taught and encouraged. One can read the breadth of the hole he leaves behind in the comments and remembrances being left on his Facebook pages (one under the name Olaf of Trollheimsfjord and one under Jim Revells).

He will be best remembered for being the man who started the Market Day at Birka event. Today, with typical attendance in the 1600-1700 person range, Birka is the largest event in the East Kingdom, unless one wishes to count Pennsic. It’s an institution, with more than a quarter century of history. And we owe it all to Olaf.

Back in 1989 he conceived a vision – an event recreating the famed Market at Birka in Sweden. It would have merchants from all over the Known World, and bear pit fighting in the Viking style, and Viking games. He presented this idea to the Barony of Stonemarche, and people agreed it sounded like a fun concept for an event. No one except Olaf really believed it would grow the way it has. He had faith in his dream, being ready to pass out fliers at Pennsic for it’s second year, even before the first one had taken place in the humble confines of the common room at his condominium complex. That first Birka had some issues, leading to him receiving a Burdened Tyger for his work as the autocrat, but it kept going. He ran it for two years, then stepped aside to let someone else serve as autocrat, but he’s always been at the heart of it, even when he wasn’t in charge of anything. In 2001 King Andreas and Queen Isabella recognized that and named him a Baron of their Court to honor his work in making Birka a landmark of the East.

He was also a fine metalsmith, making beautiful period jewelry. For those skills he was inducted into the Order of the Maunche in 2003. He was also widely known and respected for his willingness to share his skills, and to encourage beginners to take up the art he loved.  Here too he leaves a legacy. In 2002 he was instrumental in proposing the idea of a Metalsmith’s Symposium, with an entire event full of nothing but metalworking classes. Once again he stepped up to the challenge of making his dream real and ran it for the first time. He set the pattern, and the event now has a 14 year history, across multiple kingdoms.

Most of all, he will be missed by family and friends for the kind of man he was – generous, honorable, and always there when he was needed.

Mistress A’isha bint Jamil


Filed under: Uncategorized Tagged: a market day at birka, obituary, Stonemarche

Officer Profile: Signet Backlog Deputy

AEthelmearc Gazette - Sat, 2016-01-23 21:53

As part of our on-going series of Kingdom Officer profiles, the Gazette interviewed THL Zofia Kowalewska, the Signet Backlog Deputy.

SCA Name/Title
THL Zofia Kowalewska but most know me simply as Zosia.

What is the job of the Backlog Clerk?
As the Signet Backlog Clerk, I live and breathe spreadsheets and old court reports.  When someone doesn’t get a scroll because the Scribe was unable to complete the assignment in time (it happens) or a last minute award is given, we want to make sure the recipient eventually gets their scroll. Every level of award is important. So I go through the old reports, and work with our Signet and Silver Buccle to do our best to make sure the scrolls happen.

What’s the process for being assigned a backlog scroll to do?
Just ask! You can email me at signet_backlog@aethelmearc.org and request a backlog. Taking on a backlog scroll is less stressful as we don’t have a Court date, but we do ask that you get them done as soon as you can. New scribes find Backlog assignments are helpful in fine-tuning their skills without the pressure of a hard deadline. And our more seasoned Scribes who may find it challenging to meet the deadlines due to mundane life (don’t I know it), can work on Backlogs at a pace that will fit their available time. Also, if you can only Illuminate, Calligraph or you have Wordsmithing skills, please offer those skills as well. You don’t need to do it all.

What kinds of backlogs are available?
A little bit of everything. Award of Arms, Keystones, Sycamores, Gages, Champion, Sigils and occasionally other awards. Right now, it’s a mix of levels.

How long have you been in the SCA and what was your first event?
I was fortunate to have met Baroness Juliana Rosalia Dolce da Siena while in College and attended several Ice Dragons from 1994-1997 but I didn’t fully step into the Society until 2007 at Summer’s End in the Canton of Beau Fleuve. Summer’s End holds a very special place in my heart.

What has made you stay?
I have made so many friends and learned so much over the years. I also love my craft – I am a scribe and cook at heart. To be able to create a scroll for someone who has worked so hard or to cook for the populace, that is what I love. It has also allowed me to try things I wouldn’t normally do like teach classes, archery, thrown weapons and learn new skills. How often does someone get a chance to learn about the history of the fork, or find out how many different types of Pierogi there are, or how to pull off a three-course dinner for 70?

What do you like best about your office?
I get to talk to scribes from all over Æthelmearc and see their beautiful work. I also get to work with newer scribes and watch them blossom. But I think my favorite thing is taking the names OFF the list – when an assignment is completed and the scroll is signed and given to the recipient, the joy that brings is priceless.

Anything else you’d like to add?
We could use some scroll blanks for the Backlog assignments. If anyone is interested, please contact me at signet_backlog@aethelmearc.org. I will also be at the Festival of the Passing of the Ice Dragon. Any completed Backlog assignments or blanks can be delivered to me there as well.


Categories: SCA news sites

Court Report: St. Swithin’s Bog Twelfth Night

AEthelmearc Gazette - Fri, 2016-01-22 20:01

Documented from the Scrolls of the Reign of Magnus Tindal and Etain II, basileos kai basilissa Æthelmearc: the Business of  The Imperator’s Court at St. Swithin’s Bog 12th Night, 16 January Anno Societatis L, in the Barony of St. Swithin’s Bog, accompanied by Their Excellencies Iago and Emilia, Baron of Baroness of St. Swithin’s Bog, and Their Highnesses Dietrich and Thora, Prince and Princess of Atlantia. As recorded by Their Silver Buccle Herald, Kameshima-kyō Zentarō Umakai.

In the morning:

The Imperator called His Excellency Iago Benitez before Him and asked if it was still his desire to play the prize in contemplation of elevation to the Order of Defense. His Excellency agreed, and the Council of Defense was convened and instructed to escort His Excellency to the field that had been prepared for him. Before he left Court, Iago removed his White Scarf and entrusted the Baronial Coronet into the care of his lady wife, Baroness Emilia.

Baron Iago being sent to Vigil

In the evening:

The children of the Kingdom were invited to entertain themselves with toys and activities under the care of Maestro Orlando di Bene del Vinta while the adults conducted the business of Court.

Her Excellency Emilia, the Imperator, and Their Highnesses of Atlantia exchanged gift baskets in thanks and friendship.

Lord Ian Campbell of Glen Mor presented the Imperator with handmade coins to use as largesse, for he had not been able to attend the Saturnalia celebration the previous weekend.

Duchess Dorinda Courtenay presented tokens to all those fencers who were participating in the Dragon Rose Challenge, which the Emperor had recently expanded so that the fencers of Æthelmearc would no longer be challenging one Midrealm region at a time, but would now be challenging the entire Kingdom.

Lord Guillaume le Noir and Dona Emily of Denvegan announced the victors of the day’s tournaments. Prince Dietrich, who was victorious in the day’s heavy weapons tournament, presented his prize to THL Beatrix Krieger, for she had impressed him greatly.

Prince Dietrich presenting his prize winnings to THL Beatrix

John Augustine Stag was Awarded Arms for his service to the Kingdom as Privateer. Scroll by Meisterin Felicitas Flußmüllnerin.

John Augustine Stag receiving his AoA

Duke Timothy of Arindale reminded the populace of the upcoming Regional Muster and Practice scheduled for February 20-21 in the Shire of Abhain Ciach Ghlais.

Dona Katherine Vivans was inducted into the Order of the Fleur d’Æthelmearc for her skill in turning liquids into solids, such as milk into cheese or glass into beads. Scroll illuminated by THL Elyse la Bref and calligraphed by Lady Vivienne of Yardley upon wording by Baroness Clarice Roan.

Dona Katherine being greeted by Mistress Illadore and the rest of the Order of the Fleur

Master Iago Benitez was recalled before the Emperor having successfully held the field and played the prize.

Master Iago being led into court by his son, Greyson

Confirming that he was now ready to take his seat in the Council of Defense, the said Council was convened and affirmed that they wished Iago to take the seat that was reserved for him. Sir Kadan Chakhilghan Ger on Echen praised his prowess, stating that he knew Iago to be “the man to beat” in Æthelmearc before he ever knew Iago’s name, and now that he and Iago had come to be friends, that initial assessment had not changed. Mistress Illadore de Bedegrayne of the Order of the Laurel spoke of the inspiration she drew from Iago, specifically, the inspiration to parry and dodge his deadly strikes, and remembered when both she and Iago were to represent their respective Baronies in the 7 Pearls championship and she spent a year studying and preparing to face him. Mistress Caroline of Burgundy of the Order of the Pelican, who once held Iago as her cadet, testified that he had passed her in many ways including that of service. Duchess Dorinda Courtenay of the Order of Defense, who Iago had once held as his cadet, had sought him out because she wanted to learn from the best, and stated that the Order of Defense was created for people like Iago. The Emperor, moved by this testimony, created Iago a Companion of the Order of Defense and presented him with regalia of his new station: the Ancestral Livery Collar of the Order of Defense of Æthelmearc, a personal collar and a cloak bearing the badge of the order.

Master Iago, now Master of the Pelican and of Defense

Master Iago swore his Oath upon the Sword of State, and a scroll illuminated by Master Caoinleán Seanchaidh and calligraphed by THL Rachel Delicieux upon wording by Duchess Dorinda Courtenay was read. Finally, Baroness Emilia, with the assent of the Emperor, replaced the Baronial Coronet upon His Excellency’s brow and he retook his place upon the Baronial throne.

Master of Defense scroll by Master Caoinleán Seanchaidh and THL Rachel Delicieux

Maestro Bastiano de Iacopo was summoned before the Emperor and served with an Imperial Writ of Summons to return to the Imperatori at an event before the Coronation of Their Heirs and play the prize in contemplation of elevation to the Order of Defense.

Master Bastiano receives his writ

There being no further business, this Imperial Court was closed.

 

All photos courtesy of THL Caitilin ni Mhaolchonaire of the Barony of St. Swithin’s Bog.


Categories: SCA news sites

How They Died: A Quiz by Caleb Reynolds

AEthelmearc Gazette - Thu, 2016-01-21 14:18

Portrait of Mary, Queen of Scots

Match the historical figures to how they died without using The Googles. There are a few extra deaths listed, just to make it more difficult.  The answers will be posted next week.

People:
1) Christopher Marlow
2) Jon Dun Scotus
3) Eleanor of Castile
4) Ferdinand Magellan
5) Pedro de Valdivia
6) Mary, Queen of Scots
7) Sir Walter Raleigh
8) Richard Coeur de Leon
9) Tiziano “Titian” Vecellio
10) Sir Arthur Aston
11) William the Conqueror
12) Geoffrey Chaucer
13) Sigurd Eysteinsson
14) Pope Adrian IV
15) George Plantagenet
16) Martin the Humane
17) Caliph Al-Musta’sim
18) Aeschylus
19) Roger Bacon

Death:
a) Beheaded on order of James I
b) Beheaded on order of Elizabeth I
c) No record was made of time, place or reason of death
d) Died of an infection after getting shot with a crossbow bolt
e) Drowned in a butt of malmsey
f) Died of old age
g) Died in the Philippines in a fight with natives: thought he did not need any armor
h) Died of laughter
i) Rolled up in a rug and trampled to death
j) Died of the plague
k) Killed in a tavern brawl
l) Beaten to death with his own wooden leg
m) Tortured to death by the Inquisition
n) Received an infected wound by being bitten by a severed head
o) Choked to death on a fly
p) Died from injuries sustained when his horse stumbled on the burning cinders of a town he had sacked

Caliph Al-Musta’sim from an Afghanistan manuscript (BnF. Supplément Persan 1113) dated about 1430-1434, probably by Sayf Al-Vahedi.

q) Died on the road to Scotland
r) Was burned to death in a bread oven for using inferior flour
s) Stabbed by King John
t) Had molten gold poured down his throat
u) Broke his neck by tripping over his own beard
v) Died from asphyxiation after being sealed in a cupboard, by his lover, in order to hide him from her father
w) Died of pneumonia after trying to preserve a chicken in snow
x) Died of overeating lampreys
y) Buried alive
z) Was killed by a tortoise dropped, on his head, by an eagle


Categories: SCA news sites

Bellringers Event Canceled Due to Expected Bad Weather

East Kingdom Gazette - Thu, 2016-01-21 14:17

The following message has been posted to several email lists by the Autocrat of Bellringers:

This message is to inform you that this weekends Baronial birthday celebration at Bellringers has been CANCELED due to weather concerns, We will be working with the Boy Scouts to see if we can have an alternate weekend to hold the event. More information about that as it comes available.

Stay warm and safe this weekend. Feel free to call me if you have any questions or concerns.

In service,
Lord Wulfgang Gruenwald
Seneschal, Barony of Carillion

Baroness Tysha Z’ Kieva Autocrat, Bellringers
Filed under: Announcements, Events Tagged: Barony of Carillion, bellringers, Carillion, event canceled, events

Favor Designs for Princess Ariella

AEthelmearc Gazette - Wed, 2016-01-20 17:27

Unto the Good Gentles of Æthelmearc does Ariella, Princess, send Warm Greetings!

Though summer wars seem distant as snow blankets our lands, I ask your assistance in early preparations for our reign.

For many years, the Queen’s favor on my belt has symbolized to the Known World that I fight for our Kingdom and strive to bring honor to our Kingdom’s Queen by chivalrous conduct. I know many of you feel the same way, so I would like to have such favors to give to every gentle who represents Æthelmearc this summer.

To that end, I am seeking submissions for favor designs. Designs should be adaptable to a variety of media like embroidery or paint on fabric, beadwork, metalwork like pewter, or leatherwork. I would also like to be able to customize the design for specific groups, so the artisans, archers, throwers, fencers, equestrians, and heavy fighters could have variations designating their areas. I would also like the design to be modifiable to indicate champions, perhaps by adding beads or special color schemes. I know this is a tall order, but I have faith in the talent and creativity of the artisans of Æthelmearc! Designs actually rendered on appropriate media are preferred since that will help me visualize the final product, but designs can also be submitted on paper or via email. Other designs, like ones by youth for youth favors, are also welcome.

Designs should be submitted by Ice Dragon on April 2nd, where there will be a display area for favor designs from which I will choose a few designs.

Themes for favors could include our castle, the escarbuncle badge of our Sylvan Kingdom, two winged hearts (my badge) or my heraldry (a chief vair, gyronny Or and vert). I would prefer that the design make it clear that it’s for the Queen of Æthelmearc, so the color red and escarbuncles should be central elements.

Once the design is chosen, Mistress Arianna of Wynthrope has graciously offered to coordinate construction of Queen’s Favors for the reign. Feel free to contact her with any questions about design and production as well.

Please help me serve the Dream by helping me have favors for every single gentle who represents Æthelmearc this summer.

Yours In Service,
Ariella, Princess of Æthelmearc


Categories: SCA news sites

2016 Second Quarter Board of Directors Meeting Announced

East Kingdom Gazette - Wed, 2016-01-20 14:10

The next quarterly meeting of the Board of Directors for the Society for Creative Anachronism will take place on Saturday, April 23, 2016.

The start time is 9:00 a.m. PT.

The location will be:

Mt. Olive Lutheran Church
1989 East Calaveras
Milpitas CA  95035

The agenda deadline for this meeting is Friday, April 1, 2016.

Modern clothing is appreciated at all quarterly meetings.

Please contact Leslie Luther-Fulton at ea@sca.org or see our website at www.sca.org should you have any questions.
Comments are strongly encouraged and can be sent to:
SCA Inc.
Box 360789
Milpitas,  CA 95036

You may also email comments@lists.sca.org.

This announcement is an official informational release by the Society for Creative Anachronism , Inc.  Permission is granted to reproduce this announcement in its entirety in newsletters, websites and electronic mailing lists.


Filed under: Corporate Tagged: board of directors, BoD, bod meeting

The Academy of St. Clare of Assisi: Stitches in Time

East Kingdom Gazette - Wed, 2016-01-20 10:12

This article appeared in the Æthelmearc Gazette on 1/17/16, and is reprinted below in its entirety.

Love to embroider? Does the thought of spending an entire weekend learning and doing needlework fill you with anticipatory joy? The Gazette caught up with two of the organizers of the first ever needlework-centered event in Æthelmearc. The event will be held from March 11-13 in the Shire of Abhainn Ciach Ghlais (See full event announcement at the end of this article.)

We interviewed Mistress Alicia Langland and Mistress Antoinette de la Croix.

Let’s start with the Obvious – who was St. Clare of Assisi?
Alicia: We chose St. Clare of Assisi because she is the patron saint of embroiderers. An embroidered garment made by her for Saint Francis of Assisi is housed at the Convent of St. Clare in Assisi.

What prompted the organizers to try an embroidery only event?
Alicia:
Subject-specific events are wonderful, in my opinion, because they allow attendees to focus on the topic at hand rather than being pulled in different directions. They allow more in-depth teaching than what is generally offered at a schola or university event. We can tell teachers, “You can offer a 3-hour intensive class, and people WILL come!” This helped us entice teachers from other Kingdoms to come and share their expertise.

An embroidery-only event allows us to bring together people who enjoy this art form and who want to delve deeper into the techniques and tools.

Because it is a weekend-long event, we can offer intensive hands-on classes that allow lots of time for the instructors to work with and guide their students. Another plus will be having ample time to get to know each other, to swap tips and techniques, and to build a sense of community.

We would love to see this become an annual event.

Antionette: A dear friend and I have been discussing this as a concept for at least a year. Given the increased interest in embroidery we wondered if there were enough interested gentles to create an active embroidery community within Æthelmearc that would be inclined to attend an embroidery specific event.  The idea of getting the majority of embroiderers within our Kingdom in one place, talking about embroidery and sharing their stories is an exciting prospect! I have seen many introductory specialized needlework classes offered over the years but for the intermediate and advanced embroiderers there is less on the menu, so to speak. There are far fewer truly intensive classes offered outside of Pennsic. By offering how- to and longer classes within a set structure with instructor support, and with room for creativity and individualism, students are given the opportunity to create some extraordinary accessories. Research and documentation is also an area that we will address; everybody researches, however documenting can seem like the scary monster under your bed at night. By flipping on the lights we hope to reveal that the monster is actually a rolled up sock; we wish to foster less fear and more confidence by addressing documentation in a user friendly manner at this event.

How have you seen the needlework arts change in your time in the SCA? Do you think we are holding people to higher standards now that sources are more readily available? Is this a good thing?
Antoinette
: Our path to knowledge has exploded with the internet and all the arts within the SCA have been affected over my last 17 years as a Scadian. On a rainy Sunday afternoon I can visit the London Library, the Getty in California and The Heritage in Russia and cap it with a visit to the Cluny- all from the comfort of my home. Frankly, I like to think of it as a Golden Age of Enlightenment for all of us. During my early years as a Scadian, I recall lovely embroidered wool coats with large zoomorphic patterns and exquisite late period Elizabethian and Renaissance styled embroidered items but they were far and few between. I must admit that I felt a little overwhelmed when I considered the scale of such a daunting undertaking. For me embellishment was a gradual process over a 10 year period: it began with a little stem stitching, a few beads, some pearls, even more pearls, embellishing trim to original design based on extant items, information garnered from statuary, paintings, illuminated manuscripts, funerary art and so on. Once you understand the standard canon, each piece of garb is a blank canvas for you to embellish and make your own, unique piece of art.

Standards creep does exist, but it is wise to remember that we all start at the same place, the beginning and this is not a race; we will all get to the finish line in our own time. As an artist, I want to be a positive force and an encourager. I don’t believe standards creep is an excuse to be negative, we are all here to help each other grow.

Alicia: The activity level in needle arts has waxed and waned as enthusiastic people come in, get active, and then take a break to pursue other interests.  Overall, though, there has been a general trend toward a broader array of historic needle crafts. This arises from the increased number of source being published in books and on the Internet. You generally see a bump in needle arts when a major work on historic embroidery appears. Look for one later this year when the Victoria and Albert Museum holds its new Opus Anglicanum exhibit.

Are we holding people to higher standards now? No and yes.  The single continuous standard I’ve known is “are gentles drawing inspiration from historic sources”.  As more sources become available, it becomes easier to find sources.  Yet some people stall at the idea of research and documentation. They don’t understand that research can be as simple as a Google search and that documentation is just writing up all the cool stuff you found during that search. That’s one of the things we want to talk about at The Academy of St. Clare: how easy research and documentation can be.

What can we do to encourage newer participants to get started with needlework projects?
Alicia:
Hosting “Stitching Solars”: a quiet corner where embroiderers can gather at events and sit and work on projects would be a terrific way to pull people in. Lots of folks who wouldn’t consider attending a one- or two-hour embroidery class might be more likely to drop by and check out what’s going on.

Small projects for the Kingdom, such as last Pennsic’s embroidered favors for Queen Gabrielle, are another way to pull people in. Posting clear instructions with photographs of each step on the Kingdom website and in the Gazette was a brilliant idea.

I would love to see more embroidered pieces entered in displays. The more folks see how much better garments look with even a bit of simple embroidery, the more others are likely to pick up a needle and hoop. Seeing other ways to use embroidery than just to embellish clothing would be inspiring, too.

Antoinette: The best way to encourage budding newish embroiderers is to provide them with what they need to achieve their own goals and this will only happen through conversation and community. More structured Embroidery circles at events and non-events for folks to show up, catch up, stitch together, and share their recent triumphs and tragedies.

What are some online places to gather for Æthelmearcians interested in needlework?
Alicia:
Embroidery for SCAdians on Facebook has nearly 700 “likes.”  It’s a great way to get inspiration, help with a project, or news about sources and resources.

Fun Fact:  “Embroidery for SCAdians” was started 3 years ago by an Æthelmearc embroideress who wanted a way to reach out to other embroiderers.

Antoinette: There are several places on FB; I see some amazing items posted on the wall of the Facebook page mentioned above.

BMDL has a fiber arts group that gathers to share knowledge and spend time together Honestly, I prefer face time with others as my community building activity of choice: good coffee, pastry, good company;  that’s where it’s at.

What is your favorite hard copy resource?
Alicia:
I’m a big fan of the “Medieval Craftsmen” series published by the University of Toronto.  There are 8 books in the series; one of them is on embroidery.  “Embroiderers,” by Kay Staniland, contains black-and-white and color photographs of extant objects as well as images from medieval manuscripts.  The text is packed with well-researched information.  It’s a great resource for documentation.  (HINT:  Read the text!)

Antoinette: I could no more pick a favorite needle arts book than I could pick a favorite daughter! My go to series for any new technique I wish to learn are the Royal School of Needlework series. Beyond this I have spent the better part of my adult life studying paintings, sculpture including funerary art, stained glass windows and illuminated manuscripts. I also have a small leather sketchbook that I take to museums wherein I sketch designs I see painted on clothing within portraits and sacred paintings within the medieval period. I also study ornamental architectural elements and lately medieval tile floors for inspiration. This adds to my standardized canon on design motifs and patterns that were used and which increases my arsenal for designing my own work later.

Tell us a little about yourself and your involvement with needlework/favorite medium.
Alicia:
I have done some embroidery (I learned to do stem stitch so I could embroider my husband’s tunic for his elevation to the Laurel.  That was … over 15 years ago!), and I find it very relaxing.  But I don’t really consider myself an embroiderer … yet.

Antoinette: I am a life-long embroiderer and I love gold and pearls and more pearls and even more pearls. My mother taught me to embroider when I was a little girl and she believed in excellence in all things- so I learned at a young age to always give my best possible effort in whatever I endeavored to do. I find  it also prevents scribal burn out for me, I flip back and forth between needle arts and scribal arts. Embroidering is equally  relaxing and exciting so to me it is the best of both worlds!

Is the event in garb?
Alicia:
Yes, please!  What better way to show others embroidery in use?  We also want gentles to bring more embroidery than they can wear to stock the display area.

Anything else you would like to add?
Alicia:
One thing that might be worth mentioning is the two-step registration process for this event, as this might be somewhat confusing.

For most schola or university events, students sign up for classes with limits the morning of the class and pay the instructor at the start of the class.

But we didn’t want instructors to break their banks buying supplies for their classes, not knowing whether or not they would be able to recoup their expenses. So we are asking students to pre-register for the event first. When your event registration has been received, you will receive an email with information about how to register for your afternoon class with the Class Coordinator.

Payment for the kits must be received by the Class Coordinator on or before February 12, 2016;  this will give the instructors sufficient time to acquire the materials and assemble the required number of kits.

Speaking of the kits …

Compared to most SCAdian class fees, the cost of the kits is higher than what most folks are accustomed to. But when you read the kits’ contents, you’ll see why:  Kits contain high-quality supplies and period materials such as linen, silk, and wool. To replicate a kit’s contents, you would have to pay far more than what is being charged for the kit.

Consider the event a gift you give yourself! Have a hard-to-shop-for friend who loves to embroider? Paying your friend’s event registration and/or kit fee would make a wonderful present!

Despite this being a small event, it has an inter-kingdom faculty. Teachers are coming from AEthelmearc and the East. We also expect attendees from Atlantia. (The event is listed on the calendars of 5 Kingdoms!) The Academy of St. Clare will be a great place to meet embroiderers from all over the Kingdom and the eastern seaboard.

 

The Academy of St. Clare of Assisi: Stitches in Time
Shire of Abhainn Ciach Ghlais (central PA)
Friday, March 11th through Sunday, March 13, 2016
EVENT WEBSITE

Do you love to embroider? Does the idea of stitching with friends fill you with joy? Ever wish for an embroidery class that offers more than basics? If so, then clear your calendar because the Shire of Abhainn Ciach Ghlais is opening its doors to embroiderers and stitchers from all over.

The Academy of St. Clare of Assisi: Stitches in Time is an event for embroiderers, by embroiderers and about embroidery. It offers a keynote address about medieval embroidery, small specialized classes on single topics, long detailed classes on beloved styles, and a chance for embroiderers to form the community that we’ve been waiting for.

Site
This Embroidery Extravaganza will be held at Boy Scout Camp Karoondinha, 225 Thomas Dam Road, Millmont PA 17845-9448 (GPS Coordinates: 40.85630, -77.2547) Site opens at 5 PM on Friday, March 11, and closes at 11 AM on Sunday, March 13.

NOTE: The site is a Boy Scout Camp located on the side of a mountain, and the roads and paths are gravel, not paved. This can make getting about difficult. Some walking will be required, as the two buildings we will be using are not near each other. If you have mobility concerns, please request a parking placard when you send in your reservation. Cell phone service at the site can be spotty, depending on one’s carrier.

Classes

Saturday Morning:
From Picture to Pattern, THL Jaqueline de Molieres
Tools and Materials, Lady Etain ingen Ruaidri
Applique, Mistress Antoinette de la Croix
The Oxburgh Hangings, Mistress Briony of Chatham

Saturday Afternoon “Kit” Classes:
Whitework, Mistress Caterina Giaocchini
Embroidered Hoods, Mistress Antoinette de la Croix and Hrefna fruthikona Thorgrimsdottir
Pleating, Mistress Fredeburg von Katzenellenbogen
German Brick Stitch, Lady Elizabet Marshall

Each “Kit” class is 3 hours long and will be limited to a small number of students. Kits will contain specialty supplies and period materials needed to complete the class project. (Kit classes may require more equipment; if needed, you will be notified of additional items to bring after you have pre-registered.) Details about the kits can be found on the event website.

Schedule & Activities
Friday:
5:00 PM
Troll opens; check in at Edna Sheary Lodge
8:30 PM
What’s in Your Toolbox? A roundtable discussion about favorite tools and suppliers.
Saturday:
8:00 AM
Troll re-opens; check in at the Dining Hall
8:30 – 9:30
Breakfast
All day
Embroidery Display Area: Display your work, for feedback & inspiration.
Library
10:00 – 11:00
Keynote Address: History of Embroidery
11:00 – noon
Morning Classes
noon – 1:00
Lunch
1:00 – 4:00
Afternoon Classes (Students must pre-register for “Kit” classes by 2/12/16.)
4:00 – 4:30
Tea
4:30 – 6:00
Visit embroidery displays, check out the library, stitch and chat, relax …
6:00 – 7:00
Supper
7:00 till …
Roundtable Topics **
Sunday:
8:30 – 10:30
Breakfast / Research and documentation can help you take your work to the next level. Two Laurels will share their know-how over breakfast.
11:00
Site Closes

** Roundtable Topics:
Show-n-Tell (Bring the most beautiful thing you’ve ever made, bring a project you want to make but haven’t gotten the courage to start, … )
Athena’s Thimble (EK Embroiderers’ Guild: What they do, how it works, etc.)
Using the Embroidery Rubric to Judge/Improve Your Work

What to Bring:
Bring scissors, an embroidery hoop, and (if possible) your favorite lamp/lighting device with extension cords.

In addition, please bring items for the Embroidery Display and to share during Show-n-Tell.

We invite all attending to bring relevant books from their personal libraries to contribute to an event reference library. The library will be staffed, and books will not leave the library area.

Please DO NOT bring alcohol, as the Boy Scouts have a strict no alcohol policy for those who use the camp. Nor do they permit pets on site or smoking in any of the buildings. Do not jeopardize our future use of the site by violating their policies. If we find that you have alcohol, you will be asked to leave the site with no refund.

Event Fees and Reservations
The cost for the weekend – which includes lodging in a heated cabin as well as breakfast, lunch, and supper on Saturday and breakfast on Sunday – is $25.  Those without proof of current Society membership must pay the $5 non-member surcharge at the door. Event reservations must be postmarked on or before Saturday, February 20, 2016. Make checks payable to “SCA PA, Inc. Shire of ACG”.

Along with your SCA and modern names, please include your email address so we can confirm receipt of your reservation. Include any food allergies with your reservation. If you have mobility concerns, request a parking placard to place in your vehicle after you check in.

Reservations should be sent to:
Maistresse Marguerite d’Honfleur
c/o Dawn Maneval
922 College Court
Lewisburg, PA 17837

“Kit” Class Fees and Preregistration
Upon receipt of your event reservation, we will send you details for pre-registering for the “Kit” classes. Because each “Kit” class will be limited to a small number of students, pre-registration is required. Students must pre-pay for their class kit; class rosters will be filled based on the order in which payment is received. To give the instructors sufficient time to acquire the materials and assemble the required number of kits, payment for the kits must be received by the Class Coordinator on or before February 12, 2016.

Refund Policy
Because the site requires us to pay the rental fee in full well before the event, we must ask our guests to reserve in advance. If you request a refund of your event registration prior to March 1, we will refund your event fee. On or after March 1, we can only refund your event fee if we have sufficient attendees to break even.

If you have paid for a kit, we will refund the cost of the kit if we are able to re-sell it. If we cannot re-sell your kit, we will mail it to you after the event.

Lodging and Parking
The heated sleeping cabin (Edna Sheary Lodge) is accessible to those with mobility restrictions and has indoor bathrooms with bathroom with showers, toilets, sinks, and electricity. The cabin also has a kitchenette and a meeting room.

There are 32 individual cots (with mattresses) in 2 sleeping areas. Overnight guests should bring bedding (pillow, sleeping bag/sheets and blankets) and towels.

If you arrive on Friday night, drive to the Sheary Lodge to unload your gear. Parking spaces in front of the cabin will be reserved for those with mobility concerns.

If you arrive on Saturday, drive to the Dining Hall and check in. Parking spaces closest to the Dining Hall will be reserved for those with mobility concerns.

Meals
Saturday Breakfast: oatmeal & fixin’s bar, yogurt & fruit, tea, coffee
Lunch: TBA
Tea: TBA
Supper: TBA
Sunday Breakfast: scrambled eggs, pancakes, tea, coffee

Merchants
Merchants, please contact the Autocrat for details about space.

Contacts
The Autocrat for the event is Mistress Alicia Langland (hutchnsn@bucknell.edu) (mka Della Hutchison, 1194 Marshall S., Milton PA 17847; 570-742-4567)
The Head Cook is TBA.
The Reservations Clerk is Maistresse Marguerite d’Honfleur. She can be reached at dmaneval@bucknell.edu or 570-523-7372

Directions
According to Google maps, we’re about 4.5 hours (or less) from almost everywhere! Abhainn Ciach Ghlais is truly the heart of Æthelmearc!

Guests coming from the East or West will probably travel on Route 80 to Route 15 to Route 45 to Route 235. Guests coming from the North will probably travel on Route 15.

From State College: Find your best route to Route 45 East. Follow Route 45 East through the Hairy Johns State Forest. Just past the Laurelton State School (there will be many large stone buildings and well-kept ground on the left), turn right onto Route 235 South. Follow from ** below.

 From the East, North, and parts farther west: Find your best route to Route I-80. Take Exit 210 A, Route 15 South, to Lewisburg. Stay on Route 15 S for about 7 miles; you will come to the intersection of Routes 15 and 45 at a light. Turn right onto Route 45 West. Continue from the * below.

From the South: Find your best route to Route 15 North. In Lewisburg, you will come to the intersection of Routes 15 and 45 at a light. Turn left onto Route 45 West. Continue from the * below.

* Proceed west on Route 45 West for about 17 miles, passing through the towns of Mifflinburg and Hartleton (follow speed limits here). At the intersection of Route 235 South, turn left.

** From this turn, follow signs for 235 South for approximately 3 miles through Laurelton (last chance for food, gas, and ATM) and Glen Iron. The road makes several 90-degree turns; just before the last one, you will pass the West End Fire Company on your left.

Turn right onto Creek Road at the 4-way intersection past this last 90-degree turn. Penns Creek should be on your left. Stay on this road for approximately three miles; you will pass a large 3 story stone house with three arches, on your right, at this point you are about one mile from the Camp.

After you cross the bridge over Penns Creek, Penns Creek Campground will be on your right –turn right at the sign for Thomas Dam Road/Boy Scout Camp.

Camp Karoondinha is on the left, up the hill. The Dining Hall is the large stone building with 3 flagpoles in front. To get to the Edna Sheary Lodge, continue up the hill past the Dining Hall. Sheary Lodge is located in the wooded area just past the large field on the right. Site Restrictions (to top)

Drivers are asked to use their flashers and to travel at the posted 10 miles per hour.


Filed under: Arts and Sciences, Events Tagged: a&s, aethelmearc, Embroidery

Court Report from Kingdom 12th Night and Saturnalia

AEthelmearc Gazette - Wed, 2016-01-20 08:00

all photos by Jinx

Documented from the Scrolls of the Reign of Magnus Tindal and Etain II, basileos kai basilissa Æthelmearc: the Business of Their Court at Kingdom 12th Night and Saturnalia, 9 January Anno Societatis L, in the Shire of Abhain Ciach Ghlais, accompanied by Their Highnesses Thomas Byron and Ariella, Caesar and Caesaris Æthelmearciae; Their Oriental Majesties Brennan and Caoilfhionn, King and Queen of the East Kingdom; and Their Lupine Highnesses Nigel and Adrielle, Prince and Princess of Ealdormere. As recorded by Their Silver Buccle Herald, Kameshima-kyō entarō Umakai, with the assistance of Brehyres Gwendolyn the Grceful, THL Gytha Oggsdottir, and Marcellus Titus Cincinnatus.

In the morning:

Baroness Oddkatla Jonsdottir announced to the populace that the Æthelmearc Artisan’s Exchange would be occurring later that day, and that anyone who was interested in participating in future such exchanges should contact her, either at the event or via email afterwards.

The Imperatori convened Their Imperial Council of the Pelican and commanded the presence of THL Desiderata Drake. Confirming that it was
still her wish to sit vigil as They had commanded her, They remanded her into the custody of the Order and charged them to escort her to the space that had been prepared for her.

Etain Augusta announced that She had Royal favors available for all who wished to wear them.

In the evening:

The Imperatori, Their Oriental Majesties and Their Lupine Highnesses exchanged gifts of friendship and hospitality.

His Grace, Timothy of Arindale, announced a regional combat practice scheduled for February 20-21 in the Shire of Abhain Ciach Ghlais, including Chivalry from over 10 Kingdoms, Royal Peers from 9 Kingdoms, and current Monarchs or Heirs from 5.

Christopher Bronhulle, Elizabeth Bronhulle and Gilchrist Bronhulle were named to the Order of the Silver Buccle for their tireless service retaining for the Baron and Baroness of Blackstone Mountain, assisting in the setup and teardown of events and in the kitchens. Scrolls illuminated by THL Fiora d’Artusio and Lady Edana the Red and calligraphed by THL Alianora “Mom” Bronhulle upon wording by Don Po Silvertop the Rogue.

The children of the Kingdom were invited to retire from the hall and entertain themselves with toys and activities while the adults conducted the business of Court.

Baron Perote Gormal Campbell was formally recognized as a subject of the Sylvan Kingdom of Æthelmearc.

THL Kai Saer Pren was awarded the Queen’s Award of Excellence for his support of the Imperial reign, including carving the bannerpoles that are a ubiquitous part of the Royal display.

The Shire of Abhain Ciach Ghlais presented gift baskets to all present in thanks for attending their event.

The results of the day’s A&S competitions were announced.

THL Ursula of Rouen, the Kingdom’s Authorizations Clerk, expressed her desire to extend her term in the office, which was granted by the Imperatori.

With the approval of the Imperatori, Kameshima-kyō Silver Buccle announced that Master Egill the Dane had requested to be relieved of his position as Scarlet Guard Herald, the Regional Herald for Region 3. Silver Buccle then requested the presence of Don Po Silvertop the
Rogue, named him the new Scarlet Guard Herald, and encouraged all who had interest in pursuing the heraldic arts to contact him for information and direction. Silver Buccle also announced that Count Sir Jehan de la Marche had similarly requested leave from his position of Millrind Herald, the Regional Herald for Region 1, and that Lady Kathryn MacLuing had been named to that position.

Brehyres Gwendolyn the Graceful, Sylvan Bard, was called forth, for her term in that position was also at an end, and a Bardic competition had been held that day to determine her successor. While all the performances were notable, Master William de Montegilt had been judged the victor and named the new Sylvan Bard.

Shugo-daimyo Ichijo Honen was created a Companion of the Order of the Golden Alce for his prowess with katana upon the fencing field. Scroll forthcoming.

Elska Fjarfell was Awarded Arms for her enthusiasm for the arts and sciences, which has led her to the position of Kingdom A&S Champion, and her service in kitchens. Scroll by Baron Caleb Reynolds.

Hrolfr Fjarfell was Awarded Arms for his skills on both the archery field and the fencing field, and for his assistance at events. Scroll by Baron Caleb Reynolds.

Lord Chahagan Duras was elevated to the Order of the Keystone for providing continuous service to his Kingdom and Barony, including the position of Deputy Chatelaine and pursuing the path of a Marshal in Training. Scroll by Meisterin Felicitas Flußmüllnerin.

Lady Greer Wallace was inducted into the Order of the Keystone for her service at demos and at the tollner’s gate at multiple events. Scroll by Baroness Helene al-Zar’qa.

Viscountess Lucilla Theresa de Courtenay was named to the Order of the Sycamore for her skill in creating garb, including for newcomers, and her pursuit of the study of the creation of footwear. Scroll illuminated by Meestress Odriana vander Brugghe and calligraphed by THL Kieran MacRae.

Abby Rose was Awarded Arms, for the Imperatori have watched her grow into a noble subject of Æthelmearc, taking leadership roles far beyond her years, and leading children and adults alike. Scroll by Magnus Tindal Augustus.

Abby’s father, Sir Murdoch Bayne, was asked to join his daughter before the Imperatori, who also called for the presence of the Order of the Millrind and then inducted Sir Murdoch into their ranks due to his service to Abhain Ciach Ghlais, Endless Hills and Æthelmearc. Scroll by Baroness Ingegard Yarnhander.

Lady Elyse la Bref was Granted Arms and elevated to the Order of the Millrind for her service as Chatelaine and her continuing dedication to bringing newcomers into our Society. Scroll forthcoming by THL Kieran MacRae.

Lady Muirenn ingen ui Muirchertaig was Granted Arms and named to the Order of the Fleur d’Æthelmearc for her skills in fiber arts and spinning. Scroll by Lady Abigail Kelhoge.

THL Nest verch Rhys was created a Baroness of the Court for her service to newcomers, both in their recruitment and their education, and for services rendered to the Imperial reign. Scroll forthcoming by Baroness Juliana Rosalia Dolce di Siena and Tiarna Ard Padraig Ó Branduibh.

Sir Murdoch Bayne and THL Rioghnach ni Rose were created Baron and Baroness of the Court for their mastery of service, arts and combat, the three pillars of the Society. Scrolls by Master Jonathan Blaecstan.

The Imperatori recalled THL Desiderata Drake and confirmed that she had sat vigil and received counsel as They had instructed, and was now ready to be named to the Council of the Pelican. The Council was convened and agreed that it was also their wish that Desiderata be counted among their number. Countess Caryl Olesdatter praised Desiderata’s joy and enthusiasm, and thanked her for reminding Caryl why she loved being part of the Society at a point where her own joy was failing. Earl Syr Yngvar the Dysmal simply called Desiderata’s elevation the greatest thing that the Imperatori could do for the Kingdom. Master Benedict Fergus atte Mede of the Order of Defense took responsibility for any sins that Desiderata may have committed, for he had been responsible for bringing her into the Society, but she had grown far beyond that since then. Duchess Sir Rowan de la Garnison of the Order of the Laurel praised Desiderata’s love of arts, and the joy with which she shares them with others as she guides them on their own journeys of discovery. Mistress Cori Ghora of the Order of the Pelican pointed out that the Society is not doing as well as it used to, and in times of dwindling membership, Desiderata performs the most important job we have: that of Chatelaine. So moved by this testimony, the Imperatori awarded Desiderata Arms by Letters Patent, named her to the Imperial Council of the Pelican, and presented her with regalia of her new station: the Ancestral Pelican Medallion of Æthelmearc, a personal medallion, and a palla bearing the badge of the Order. Dame Desiderata then gave her Oath of Fealty, and words by THL Isabel Fleuretan as promissory of a scroll in progress by the Angel’s Keep Scriptorium were read.

Baron Ulrich Drachendonner and Lord Hrolfr Fjarfell were awarded the Sigil of Æthelmearc for their service to the reign.

Countess Caryl Olesdatter was created the 40th Jewel of Æthelmearc for her continuing service and inspiration since Æthelmearc’s inception as a Kingdom. Scroll by Magnus Tindal Augustus.

 

Her Highness Ariella announced that she would be holding a Royal favor competition at the upcoming Festival of the Passing of the Ice Dragon to choose her royal favors once Their Highnesses had ascended the Sylvan Thrones. All those who are interested in participating are encouraged to bring their entries to the aforementioned Festival, scheduled for April 2 in the Barony of Rhydderich Hael.

There being no further business, this Imperial Court was closed.

In Honor and Service,
Kameshima Zentarō Umakai
高貴国境の王国の治部卿
Silver Buccle Principal Herald, Kingdom of Æthelmearc


Categories: SCA news sites

Deadline Looming for Gulf Wars Pre-Reg!

AEthelmearc Gazette - Tue, 2016-01-19 20:00

photo by Master Guiseppe di san Donato

For all of you who from Æthelmearc planning to attend this Gulf Wars
this year, this is a reminder that mail-in pre-registrations are due by January 31, and the Gulf Wars staff has recently updated the event information, announcing that the online electronic deadline for pre-registration is February 15.  Much like Pennsic, how much land the kingdom encampment is allocated is determined by how many pre-registrations we have, and as such, if you do not pre-register, we cannot guarantee that there will be a space for your tent.

Further details are available on the Gulf Wars Registration web site. When you do pre-register, the camp name is “Aethelmearc”; please also email me at
koredono@gmail.com, so I can include you in the camp GoogleGroup, which is where and how all camp-specific details will be posted and discussed (including things like the meal plan, being coordinated once again this year by Mistress Illadore).

I hope to see many of you there.

In Service,

Magariki Katsuichi no Koredono, KSCA
曲水 勝一 の 兵殿
Æthelmearc Gulf Wars Land Agent


Categories: SCA news sites

Making SCA Order Medallions

AEthelmearc Gazette - Mon, 2016-01-18 23:26

Recently a call was made for gentles to donate order medallions for the Crown to give to worthy subjects when they are inducted into Kingdom orders. If you think you don’t have the talent or skill to make them, think again! Mistress Arianna of Wynthrope asked artisans from all around Æthelmearc to explain how they make medallions using media like embroidery, paint on ceramic, leatherwork, and metalwork. Here’s how they responded.

Note: the designs for the Kingdom order badges are available on the Æthelmearc Heraldry website.

Needlework

Baroness Bronwyn nic Gregor, former Baroness of Thescorre, is a skilled needleworker who has made numerous embroidered order medallions. She uses a variety of methods for embroidered awards medallions.

Cross Stitch:

  • Do not use Aida cloth, due to both size and appearance. Monaco (25 ct.) or Lugana (28 ct) fabrics are easy to work with as they are even weave fabrics and produce an attractive piece. With both of these and with a linen you need to be careful to lock stitches in place by orienting the stitches and completing a cross before moving to the next stitch. If you are not careful the stitches will slide under the weave. Half stitches don’t work well with these materials. Garment fabrics can be used but they may not be even weave, resulting in a warped or stretched pattern. This might be desirable depending on how the medallion is mounted. Take care to orient the design correctly if your fabric is not an even weave. Charted patterns are available online from the Thescorre Threadworkers’ Company as well as by Mistress Yvianne de Castel d’Avignon and Lady Astridr Vigaskegg.

Golden Alce in cross stitch by the Thescorre Threadworkers’ Guild

Embroidered:

  • Garment linen or silk both work well. If you are using a colored fabric it should be prewashed. I generally copy the awards from the Kingdom Heraldry website and paste various sizes into a Word or PowerPoint document and print it off. I match the pattern size to the one I want and use fabric transfer pages tracing over the picture to create an outline. Drawing the picture on the fabric or stitching free-hand will also work.

Threads:

  • I pretty much exclusively use silk thread, but like the feel of a bamboo thread called Mandarin. I am lucky enough to live near an embroidery store, but most materials can be purchased online. I am aware of 3 distinct thread sources in a variety of colors. The Italian-made thread available from Lady Dionatta is a 12 ply tends to be a little thin. Madeira comes in handy packets and is a 4 ply x 3 meters for $4+. I prefer Splendor which is made in France is 12 ply x 8 yards at $3.50 -$4 a bobbin. These are easy to work with. The threads should be prewashed, but I confess I often don’t do so. If you are using beeswax to strengthen the thread it will not fill as well and may impact the color of the thread. You should use it in all of the thread color you are using or do not use at all.

Finishing:

  • Embroidered Sycamore medallion. Photo by Lady Margrethe la Fauvelle.

    Frames – I have searched a variety of sources for frames and often find they are: not durable, unattractive, the wrong size or cost prohibitive. An early source from Hallmark Mother’s Day collection dried up years ago. In recent years I have purchased family tree photo holders from Things Remembered. These come in the form of a silver or pewter tree with decorative frames (often double-sided) hanging from them. I have had several naked trees hanging around my house which would be attractive for displaying the finished medallions. You have the option of creating two different embroidered works to “match” outfits or simply leaving one side blank. These generally run about $50 for a twelve frame tree.

  • Finishing without frames – You will need to locate a suitable backing disc. I have found that the St. Patrick’s Day gold plastic coins available at JoAnn or Michaels are ideal for medallions (and probably lucky too). I using a running stitch larger than the size of the coin, placing the coin inside and drawing it tight. Tie off the thread and make a plain backing piece. Whip stitch the two pieces together. I stitch beads around the join and then add a necklace. I prefer to use semi-precious and non-precious beads, but this can be price prohibitive. Glass beads can be a good substitute, but can still be expensive. Depending on the size of the medallion you can use other materials. I have used quarters with a backing of a couple layers of plastic stencil material. Be careful to seal other metal discs so it doesn’t rust through the fabric. Wood Discs tend to be too thick for my taste, but it is possible to use them.

THLady Clarissa da Svizzera, also of Thescorre, has also made numerous embroidered/needlepoint medallions, and offers this insight on the combined Pelican-Laurel medallion below:

  • It is worked on 40-count silk gauze (40 threads per inch) which necessitates the filled-in background. The piece shown is just over an inch in diameter, laid flat as shown. It is worked in silk floss using basketweave stitch which uses more floss but provides a denser, better looking background. The finished stitching was mounted over a domed disc placed on a flat jewelry pin back fitting that had “fingers” to bend to hold the disc in place. The recipient doesn’t like “danglies”, and I believe wears this on his hat.

Embroidered Pelican/Laurel by THLady Clarissa da Svizzera

Leatherwork

Baron Magnus de Lyons, recently invested as Baron of the Rhydderich Hael, is also a leatherworker who makes tooled leather order medallions.

Materials:

  • I use 8-9 ounce vegetable-tanned cowhide. In terms of inches, 8-9 ounce leather is just over 1/8 of an inch thick. You need it to be thick enough to tool but not so thick that the finished project looks clunky. Veg-tanned cowhide is available from several on-line sellers (Tandy leather, for example) or if you are fortunate enough, at a local leather shop. Leather can be on the expensive side (as much as $8 US per square foot), but the nice part of medallions is that they don’t require much leather (2 inch diameter on average). Local and on-line sellers will often offer small scraps for a reduced price, or if you know a person who works with leather, most of them have an odds and ends bin that is useless to them but is a treasure trove for a medallion maker. Pro tip: leather scraps are cheap, but make sure you are using fresh leather. Using old or imperfect leather will result in a lower quality finished product.

Construction:

  • My medallions are all tooled leather. I trace or draw the design onto the leather and then use a swivel knife to cut the design into the leather.
  • Next I use a simple leatherworking tool called a “spoon” to shape the leather and give the design a 3D effect. This is done by wetting the leather with water to make it malleable and then pressing the design into the leather with the spoon.
  • When the leather dries, the design is permanent.
  • There are a ton of different leather working tools that can be used for tooling but I do about 95% of my work with the swivel knife and spoon.
  • Once the leather is tooled, I color the medallion with leather dye.
  • Once that is dry I paint the details with acrylic hobby paint. My paint of choice is the Games Workshop brand of “base” paints. They look good and have almost full coverage with one coat (even over black leather dye).
  • The average build time for a medallion with a moderately complex design (going from raw leather to painted) is about 4 days. A lot of this is drying time (water after tooling, dying, and painting) so working on multiple medallions is a good idea. It won’t cut down the production time but you will increase output. It is possible to shorten the production time, but rushing will often yield a lower quality product.

Leather order medallions by Baron Magnus de Lyons

Tips:

  • Making leather medallions is a fairly painless process. Follow all the normal rules for using sharp objects and chemicals (leather dye, paint, etc.) and you will be fine. 
  • Leather medallions are ridiculously durable so they are a great option for people who want to wear an award in high use environments like the list field.
  • Leather is also very forgiving when it comes to inexperienced crafters. A finely detailed finished product might take some practice but the basic product is durable, safe to wear, and pleasing to the eye.
  • If people have questions feel free to contact me directly, either on the Book of Face at “Lance Magnus Kazmark” or by email.

Important links:

Painted Ceramic

Lady Máirghréad Stíobhard inghean uí Choinne of the Barony of Thescorre has led efforts by the artisans of her barony to make ceramic medallions. Here she shares how they’re crafted. She says ceramic award medallions can be prepared fairly simply with about an hour of effort over a period of a day, and the process works best with the simpler award badges: Sycamore, Millrind, Alce.

Materials:

  • Pendant blanks
  • Ceramic Paint
  • Permanent fine line black marker
  • Brushes
  • Glass cleaner (Windex)
  • Paper towel
  • Toothpicks
  • Oven capable of 310 degrees F

Purchasing Supplies:

  • The porcelain pendant blanks were purchased from Freddi’s China. The unframed pendants without chains (shown) are $1.25 each. A pendant blank that is framed in metal including chain can be purchased for $4.99 each. These have been found to be more durable. Remove the chains before starting the painting process.
  • The Pebeo paint was purchased at The Art Store in Rochester, N.Y. but you can also order them online at Pebeo.com. Each color (red, yellow and black were purchased) is about $5.00 for 2 oz. This paint can be used on ceramic or metal.
  • Add cords or chains to complete the medallions.

Steps:

  • Ceramic Sycamore medallion by Lady Mairghread

    Clean the front side of the medallions with glass cleaner and paper towel.

  • Using as little handling as possible, draw the pattern for the badge onto the medallion using a fine line black permanent marker.
  • Apply the paints one color at a time, starting with black for the outline. Let each paint color dry about 10 minutes before proceeding to the next color.
  • If mistakes are made, they can be “erased” using a toothpick to scrape the paint away.
  • Allow the paint to air dry for 24 hours.
  • Fire the medallions in a conventional oven, following the directions on the paint package for drying and firing. This converts the paint to ceramic. A second hand toaster oven be dedicated to this purpose. In this way, any residue from the process that may adhere to the inside of the oven enclosure cannot contaminate food items cooked in the oven later.

Pewter Casting

Lady Edana the Red of the Barony-Marche of the Debatable Lands learned pewter casting from her Laurel, Master Will Langdon of Greymorne. Lord Andreas de Heisende from the Shire of Gryffyn’s Keep has made pewter medallions as largess for King Malcolm and Queen Tessa to give to the Kingdom of the Outlands.

Lady Edana says this craft is best pursued with someone knowledgeable in the art. With the guidance of her Laurel, Master Langdon of Greymorne, and feedback from many other pewter casters, she begin with the first lesson in casting: “Hot metal looks the same as cold metal.”

Materials

  • Cutting soapstone. Photo by Lord Andreas de Heisende.

    You need rock to carve into a mold – soapstone is a perfect medium for beginners. Lady Edana buys hers at an art store for $3.00 per pound (Ed. note, it’s available through Dick Blick Art Supplies or Sculptor.org online). Try to select a piece that is free from inclusions, which you cannot always see. She always performs a scratch test to see how readily it carves. Lord Andreas recommends using a hacksaw to cut the soapstone blocks into two 1″ thick slices and sanding them smooth so they fit tightly together.

  • Tools Lady Edana the Red uses for casting pewter.

    Lady Edana says tools specifically for carving are hard to find, so many people create their own or use jeweler and dental tools. She has modified bead making tools, and employed micro tools such as screwdrivers and hand drills bits. Lord Andreas epoxied a regular nail into an antler and then shaped the tip to the working head that he needed. He also used ball files and wood carving tools. Lady Edana also uses “planers” to carve large flat surfaces evenly and a modified compass utilizing the sharp pointy end. For shapes she has various templates of circles, ovals and squares and a good sturdy metal compass. Costs are varied from free to how much your pocket book will withstand.

  • Carving tools made by Lord Andreas

    You will also want rulers (one transparent and one metal), sandpaper, play-doh, and talc. A cast iron pot, ladle, and a heating source (Edana uses a propane camping stove) will get you started. A metal file and steel wool are used for finishing. The greatest needful thing is loupes – magnifying eyeglasses. It is irrelevant how wonderful your eyesight is, they are indispensable. Edana bought hers for $50 and considers it well worth the cost.

  • Pewter is an alloy of tin and a mixture of various elements that may include bismuth, antimony, and occasionally copper or silver. It used to contain lead, but no longer does because lead is amazingly poisonous and absorbed through ingestion and skin contact include the eye. There are two kinds of pewter available: reclaimed, which is old pewter items re-melted into ingots; and pewter alloys categorized as R92 and R98. The number represents the tin to element/metal ratio. RotoMetals is a great source, but it’s worth comparison shopping. Prices are roughly $18 per pound.

Lord Andreas heats his pewter in a cast iron pot.

Safety

  • Use eye protection, gloves, a leather apron and a facemask. Tie your hair back. Don’t wear loose clothing of synthetic fabrics, and wear enclosed leather shoes. You will get metal on you at some point. It splashes, spills and is quite hot even if it looks cool. When you wish to exam a cast item, you may think it is cool – it is NOT. Pewter’s melting point is between 350-500 degrees.

Designs and Carving

  • Draw the design to scale on paper, then draw it in reverse. YOU MUST DO THIS, because you are going to carve in reverse and looking at the design in reverse reduces mistakes. You can either trace or draw the reverse design on the soapstone. In the picture shown here, the darker square is the back piece and the lighter is the front piece of soapstone.
  • Now contemplate the various depths of your carving. Lady Edana uses three. The most shallow is the shape (circle) of the medallion. The deepest is the foremost (cloud) of the picture. The sun’s depth will be shallower than the cloud, yet deeper than the shape, so it appears to rest behind the cloud. Carve to the appropriate depths, and be careful not to create undercuts, when you have an overhang of soapstone where the pewter is to pour. Undercuts will cause the pewter to lock into the mold and more than likely crack it. Fine sandpaper will help you create smooth surfaces.
  • While carving, Lady Edana presses play-doh into the mold to check her progress. You can fine tune details of your carving when you test pour with pewter. When you are finished, carve a “Y” shaped sprue connecting to your circle into which the pewter will enter. You will invest 4+ hours in the carving depending on your skill and detail.
  • Lord Andreas made 60 medallions using a little over 4 pounds of pewter. The total time to carve, cast and file them was around 120 hours.

Pouring

  • L-pin diagram by Lady Edana

    Pouring occurs in several stages. First, pin my molds so they match exactly every time you pour. You must do this for medallions with two carved sides. Using a drill, make a “L” shaped hole from the side of the stone. Then drill a matching divot on the second piece of stone. Squeezing the two pieces of stone together, pour melted lead into the opening. The result is an exposed peg that fits into the divot, holding it in the same place every time. Lead is used for these pins as it has a higher melting point than pewter. Repeat the process again opposing the one you just created.

  • The second stage of pouring is to see how well the mold casts. You may need to touch up some of your carving. If pewter is not completely filling the shape, carve air vents from the shape to the outer edges of the mold to allow air to escape instead of creating pockets in the medallion. If the pewter sticks to the stone, lightly dust the stone with talc. Sticking can also be cause by overhangs.
  • This stage can be the most tedious and frustrating because there are so many variable as to why the medallion is not pouring correctly. It takes me anywhere from 30 minutes to three hours to troubleshoot a mold.
  • When the medallion does pour to your standard, begin the last stage of pouring, mass production. You can pour one right after the other. You may have to stop because the mold is too hot to handle or begins to have mistakes. Letting the mould cool rectifies most issues.

Finishing

  • Once the medallions are cast and cooled, remove the sprue and any flashing (extra pewter on the edges of the shape) with a file and smooth with sandpaper. Remove any oxidation and shine the medallion with steel wool. With skill and luck, you will end up with something like this:
  • For hanging the piece, either carve loop into the mould or drill a hole in the pewter.
  • Lord Andreas notes that you can paint your pewter medallions with enamel paints that fuse at very low temperatures. Pewter melts around 430 to 460 degrees F, so you after painting your medallions, you can put them in the oven at 250-300 degrees for about an hour to fuse the paint and make it permanent without melting the pewter.

Medallion at left by Lady Edana, medallions at right by Lord Andreas.

Metalwork

Don Anais Fenne of the Shire of Misty Highlands is well-known for his metalwork, and tells us about several methods he uses when making enameled order medallions.

Materials:

  • I predominately do my medallions in metal: Brass, bronze, copper, pewter, silver, or gold. I would say that the two sources that I use the most for supplies are Rio Grande Jewelry Supply and Online Metals.

Techniques:

  • The two methods that I use the most for making medallions are repoussé, which involves shaping metal into a bowl of pitch, and cloisonné, which is a method of fusing glass enamels to metal in intricate patterns. Both of these methods have a very steep learning curve and require fairly large investments in both equipment and in time to learn to do them well. Cloisonné, in particular, is not for the faint of heart, as it involves multiple firings in a kiln, and one small mistake could erase hours upon hours of work.
  • The time invested in my work ranges anywhere from a couple of hours for a simpler piece all the way up to anywhere between 20-40 hours for a complex peerage medallion.
  • The most important things to remember in the styles of awards that I do is that you need to practice, practice, practice in order to be competent in these styles. I highly recommend finding someone that you know already has experience working in the styles you would like to try and get as many pointers from them as you can. You would be astounded at the time you can save and the mistakes you can avoid just by getting tips from someone who has done it many, many times. And with any metal work, always, always, always keep safety in mind. You haven’t lived until you have had to remove a tiny sliver of bronze that was sticking into your own eyeball with a pair of tweezers.
  • Those wanting to break into doing metal medallions might want to look into etched metal. It has a much lower learning curve, a much lower equipment cost, and an easy repeatability of design. All you need is a sheet of metal, some ferric chloride (which is an easy to use and much safer and cleaner etching chemical than any acids… it is also readily available on the internet as it is also used for etching circuit boards) and something to use as a resist. You can use anything from fingernail polish to latex paint. I personally use Staedtler Lumocolor Permanent Red pens for fine designs, and a thick tarry substance called asphaltum for large ones. This method allows you do designs both simple and incredibly complex, and with the use of a stencil, you can easily repeat your design on multiple pieces.

Medallions by Don Anais, cloisonné at left, repoussé at right

Countess Genevieve du Vent Argent of the Barony-Marche of the Debatable Lands received her Laurel for the beautiful cloisonné medallions she made. She provides us with details of how they are constructed for those who are interested in this challenging technique.

What is Enameling?

  • Enameling is a process of fusing colored glass to metal through several firings in a kiln. Enamel firing temperatures are between 1250-1500 degrees F. Enamel glass is available in stick form, or pre-ground into granules (like salt or sugar) or a powder, and comes in several opaque, opalescent and transparent colors. Every layer of enamel requires a separate firing; the color is built up one layer at a time. Opaque enamels can be applied more thickly; a small piece may only need 6-8 layers. Transparent enamels usually look clearer when applied in several very thin layers. Depending on the project, a piece with transparent enamels need 15-25 layers to complete. Patience is rewarded when your piece shines in the sunlight like a beautiful jewel!

Enameling Techniques

  • There are several enameling techniques; when I was actively making medallions years ago, my favorite technique was cloisonné. Thin wires are formed into cells or “cloisons” into a design. Besides acting as a linear design element, the wires also keep the different enamel colors separated, so the colors won’t run into one another when the glass is molten hot during firing. This is a great method to use for creating simple linear designs.
  • For information on the enameling process, several books and lists of workshops and classes are available on The Enamelist Society web page.

Materials:

  • The base metal must be 99.9% pure copper (not an alloy) for enamels to adhere, can be purchased already cut into circles or other shapes. Fine silver .999 works well and 24-karat gold works very well but is a bit expensive. (Sterling silver .925 can also be used but requires an additional process called “depletion gilding” to prepare the surface to accept the enamels.)
  • Cloisonné wire must also be either pure .999 fine silver or 24-karat gold, and should be annealed (heated and cooled) so that it is soft and flexible for shaping. Copper wire can be used, but adds a clean-up step to every firing, since the copper will oxidize (fire scale).
  • Rio Grande is a good source for silver cloisonné wire, copper sheet, lead-free enamels, kilns, enameling and jewelry tools.
  • The Enamelworks Supply Company is a great source for books, lead-based enamels, pre-cut copper shapes, cloisonné wire, enameling tools, and other supplies.

Construction and Safety

  • Firing is done at very high temperatures: 1250-1500 degrees.
  • Some enamels are lead-based, which means they are toxic and must be handled carefully. Lead-free enamels are available, but I think that the colors are not quite as vibrant as the lead-based enamels.
  • Enameling is a time-consuming, methodical process. If you skip a step or are not meticulous in cleaning your enamels or keeping your workspace clean, dirt or impurities will get into your enameled piece and will ruin it, or may cause you extra clean-up work. Rushing a project or working when you are tired is definitely not a good idea — if the kiln gets too hot or you get distracted while firing, you may melt your piece and will ruin hours of hard work. Cooling the piece too quickly will cause the enamel to crack.
  • There are a few things I did to speed up the process somewhat. Buying pre-cut or die-formed copper shapes saves a lot of time compared to cutting out shapes from copper sheet metal.
  • Working on multiples of the same piece simultaneously saves time (groups of 3 worked well), so if one piece melted in the kiln, I had a couple of spares in progress. Each step required extra “waiting” time: drying the wet-packed enamel, allowing the fired piece to cool, filing the edges and cleaning the enamel after each firing — I could work on the next piece while the previous one was in one of these “waiting” stages.
  • For the final step of “stoning” – grinding the surface of the enamel to smooth out the piece, traditionally done by hand with a carborundum grinding stone, I saved time by using a power tool, a flexible-shaft (like a Dremel tool) with a diamond-cloth pad acting as the grinding stone. Stoning is done with the enamel sitting in a shallow pan of water, so you have to be careful while using a power tool, but it sure speeds things up and saves your elbow from repetitive stress. However, you also have to be careful not to grind too quickly or you may lose too much detail or color.
  • Enamels are essentially “glass on metal”. If someone’s medallion is dropped or gets smacked into something, it will crack or chunks of enamel may fall out. A damaged medallion can be very difficult to repair; often it will just melt in the kiln. While I used to just drill a hole in the copper before enameling and add a jump-ring and neck cord to the piece when it was completed, I wouldn’t recommend this after seeing what has happened to some of my pieces over the years. Really, enameled pieces should be set into bezeled pieces of jewelry (as pendants or pins) in the same way that a jewel, stone, or cameo is set into a ring or brooch. The bezel or other setting will protect the edges of the piece, and the effect is much nicer looking, finished piece of jewelry. So you need to add jewelry making skills to the list of requirements or find a pre-made setting or a friendly jeweler to set your pieces for you.

Cloisonné medallions by Countess Genevieve,
photo at left by Master Gille MacDhonuill.


Categories: SCA news sites

The Academy of St. Clare of Assisi: Stitches in Time

AEthelmearc Gazette - Sun, 2016-01-17 20:36

(c) 2014, Alexandra Salazar, more info at http://string-or-nothing.com/2014/01/06/elizabethan-blackwork-smock/

Love to embroider? Does the thought of spending an entire weekend learning and doing needlework fill you with anticipatory joy? The Gazette caught up with two of the organizers of the first ever needlework-centered event in Æthelmearc. The event will be held from March 11-13 in the Shire of Abhainn Ciach Ghlais (See full event announcement at the end of this article.)

We interviewed Mistress Alicia Langland and Mistress Antoinette de la Croix.

Let’s start with the Obvious – who was St. Clare of Assisi?
Alicia: We chose St. Clare of Assisi because she is the patron saint of embroiderers. An embroidered garment made by her for Saint Francis of Assisi is housed at the Convent of St. Clare in Assisi.

What prompted the organizers to try an embroidery only event?
Alicia:
Subject-specific events are wonderful, in my opinion, because they allow attendees to focus on the topic at hand rather than being pulled in different directions. They allow more in-depth teaching than what is generally offered at a schola or university event. We can tell teachers, “You can offer a 3-hour intensive class, and people WILL come!” This helped us entice teachers from other Kingdoms to come and share their expertise.

An embroidery-only event allows us to bring together people who enjoy this art form and who want to delve deeper into the techniques and tools.

Because it is a weekend-long event, we can offer intensive hands-on classes that allow lots of time for the instructors to work with and guide their students. Another plus will be having ample time to get to know each other, to swap tips and techniques, and to build a sense of community.

We would love to see this become an annual event.

Antionette: A dear friend and I have been discussing this as a concept for at least a year. Given the increased interest in embroidery we wondered if there were enough interested gentles to create an active embroidery community within Æthelmearc that would be inclined to attend an embroidery specific event.  The idea of getting the majority of embroiderers within our Kingdom in one place, talking about embroidery and sharing their stories is an exciting prospect! I have seen many introductory specialized needlework classes offered over the years but for the intermediate and advanced embroiderers there is less on the menu, so to speak. There are far fewer truly intensive classes offered outside of Pennsic. By offering how- to and longer classes within a set structure with instructor support, and with room for creativity and individualism, students are given the opportunity to create some extraordinary accessories. Research and documentation is also an area that we will address; everybody researches, however documenting can seem like the scary monster under your bed at night. By flipping on the lights we hope to reveal that the monster is actually a rolled up sock; we wish to foster less fear and more confidence by addressing documentation in a user friendly manner at this event.

How have you seen the needlework arts change in your time in the SCA? Do you think we are holding people to higher standards now that sources are more readily available? Is this a good thing?
Antoinette
: Our path to knowledge has exploded with the internet and all the arts within the SCA have been affected over my last 17 years as a Scadian. On a rainy Sunday afternoon I can visit the London Library, the Getty in California and The Heritage in Russia and cap it with a visit to the Cluny- all from the comfort of my home. Frankly, I like to think of it as a Golden Age of Enlightenment for all of us. During my early years as a Scadian, I recall lovely embroidered wool coats with large zoomorphic patterns and exquisite late period Elizabethian and Renaissance styled embroidered items but they were far and few between. I must admit that I felt a little overwhelmed when I considered the scale of such a daunting undertaking. For me embellishment was a gradual process over a 10 year period: it began with a little stem stitching, a few beads, some pearls, even more pearls, embellishing trim to original design based on extant items, information garnered from statuary, paintings, illuminated manuscripts, funerary art and so on. Once you understand the standard canon, each piece of garb is a blank canvas for you to embellish and make your own, unique piece of art.

Standards creep does exist, but it is wise to remember that we all start at the same place, the beginning and this is not a race; we will all get to the finish line in our own time. As an artist, I want to be a positive force and an encourager. I don’t believe standards creep is an excuse to be negative, we are all here to help each other grow.

Alicia: The activity level in needle arts has waxed and waned as enthusiastic people come in, get active, and then take a break to pursue other interests.  Overall, though, there has been a general trend toward a broader array of historic needle crafts. This arises from the increased number of source being published in books and on the Internet. You generally see a bump in needle arts when a major work on historic embroidery appears. Look for one later this year when the Victoria and Albert Museum holds its new Opus Anglicanum exhibit.

Are we holding people to higher standards now? No and yes.  The single continuous standard I’ve known is “are gentles drawing inspiration from historic sources”.  As more sources become available, it becomes easier to find sources.  Yet some people stall at the idea of research and documentation. They don’t understand that research can be as simple as a Google search and that documentation is just writing up all the cool stuff you found during that search. That’s one of the things we want to talk about at The Academy of St. Clare: how easy research and documentation can be.

What can we do to encourage newer participants to get started with needlework projects?
Alicia:
Hosting “Stitching Solars”: a quiet corner where embroiderers can gather at events and sit and work on projects would be a terrific way to pull people in. Lots of folks who wouldn’t consider attending a one- or two-hour embroidery class might be more likely to drop by and check out what’s going on.

Small projects for the Kingdom, such as last Pennsic’s embroidered favors for Queen Gabrielle, are another way to pull people in. Posting clear instructions with photographs of each step on the Kingdom website and in the Gazette was a brilliant idea.

I would love to see more embroidered pieces entered in displays. The more folks see how much better garments look with even a bit of simple embroidery, the more others are likely to pick up a needle and hoop. Seeing other ways to use embroidery than just to embellish clothing would be inspiring, too.

Antoinette: The best way to encourage budding newish embroiderers is to provide them with what they need to achieve their own goals and this will only happen through conversation and community. More structured Embroidery circles at events and non-events for folks to show up, catch up, stitch together, and share their recent triumphs and tragedies.

What are some online places to gather for Æthelmearcians interested in needlework?
Alicia:
Embroidery for SCAdians on Facebook has nearly 700 “likes.”  It’s a great way to get inspiration, help with a project, or news about sources and resources.

Fun Fact:  “Embroidery for SCAdians” was started 3 years ago by an Æthelmearc embroideress who wanted a way to reach out to other embroiderers.

Antoinette: There are several places on FB; I see some amazing items posted on the wall of the Facebook page mentioned above.

BMDL has a fiber arts group that gathers to share knowledge and spend time together Honestly, I prefer face time with others as my community building activity of choice: good coffee, pastry, good company;  that’s where it’s at.

What is your favorite hard copy resource?
Alicia:
I’m a big fan of the “Medieval Craftsmen” series published by the University of Toronto.  There are 8 books in the series; one of them is on embroidery.  “Embroiderers,” by Kay Staniland, contains black-and-white and color photographs of extant objects as well as images from medieval manuscripts.  The text is packed with well-researched information.  It’s a great resource for documentation.  (HINT:  Read the text!)

Antoinette: I could no more pick a favorite needle arts book than I could pick a favorite daughter! My go to series for any new technique I wish to learn are the Royal School of Needlework series. Beyond this I have spent the better part of my adult life studying paintings, sculpture including funerary art, stained glass windows and illuminated manuscripts. I also have a small leather sketchbook that I take to museums wherein I sketch designs I see painted on clothing within portraits and sacred paintings within the medieval period. I also study ornamental architectural elements and lately medieval tile floors for inspiration. This adds to my standardized canon on design motifs and patterns that were used and which increases my arsenal for designing my own work later.

Tell us a little about yourself and your involvement with needlework/favorite medium.
Alicia:
I have done some embroidery (I learned to do stem stitch so I could embroider my husband’s tunic for his elevation to the Laurel.  That was … over 15 years ago!), and I find it very relaxing.  But I don’t really consider myself an embroiderer … yet.

Antoinette: I am a life-long embroiderer and I love gold and pearls and more pearls and even more pearls. My mother taught me to embroider when I was a little girl and she believed in excellence in all things- so I learned at a young age to always give my best possible effort in whatever I endeavored to do. I find  it also prevents scribal burn out for me, I flip back and forth between needle arts and scribal arts. Embroidering is equally  relaxing and exciting so to me it is the best of both worlds!

Is the event in garb?
Alicia:
Yes, please!  What better way to show others embroidery in use?  We also want gentles to bring more embroidery than they can wear to stock the display area.

Anything else you would like to add?
Alicia:
One thing that might be worth mentioning is the two-step registration process for this event, as this might be somewhat confusing.

For most schola or university events, students sign up for classes with limits the morning of the class and pay the instructor at the start of the class.

But we didn’t want instructors to break their banks buying supplies for their classes, not knowing whether or not they would be able to recoup their expenses. So we are asking students to pre-register for the event first. When your event registration has been received, you will receive an email with information about how to register for your afternoon class with the Class Coordinator.

Payment for the kits must be received by the Class Coordinator on or before February 12, 2016;  this will give the instructors sufficient time to acquire the materials and assemble the required number of kits.

Speaking of the kits …

Compared to most SCAdian class fees, the cost of the kits is higher than what most folks are accustomed to. But when you read the kits’ contents, you’ll see why:  Kits contain high-quality supplies and period materials such as linen, silk, and wool. To replicate a kit’s contents, you would have to pay far more than what is being charged for the kit.

Consider the event a gift you give yourself! Have a hard-to-shop-for friend who loves to embroider? Paying your friend’s event registration and/or kit fee would make a wonderful present!

Despite this being a small event, it has an inter-kingdom faculty. Teachers are coming from AEthelmearc and the East. We also expect attendees from Atlantia. (The event is listed on the calendars of 5 Kingdoms!) The Academy of St. Clare will be a great place to meet embroiderers from all over the Kingdom and the eastern seaboard.

 

The Academy of St. Clare of Assisi: Stitches in Time
Shire of Abhainn Ciach Ghlais (central PA)
Friday, March 11th through Sunday, March 13, 2016
EVENT WEBSITE

Do you love to embroider? Does the idea of stitching with friends fill you with joy? Ever wish for an embroidery class that offers more than basics? If so, then clear your calendar because the Shire of Abhainn Ciach Ghlais is opening its doors to embroiderers and stitchers from all over.

The Academy of St. Clare of Assisi: Stitches in Time is an event for embroiderers, by embroiderers and about embroidery. It offers a keynote address about medieval embroidery, small specialized classes on single topics, long detailed classes on beloved styles, and a chance for embroiderers to form the community that we’ve been waiting for.

Site
This Embroidery Extravaganza will be held at Boy Scout Camp Karoondinha, 225 Thomas Dam Road, Millmont PA 17845-9448 (GPS Coordinates: 40.85630, -77.2547) Site opens at 5 PM on Friday, March 11, and closes at 11 AM on Sunday, March 13.

NOTE: The site is a Boy Scout Camp located on the side of a mountain, and the roads and paths are gravel, not paved. This can make getting about difficult. Some walking will be required, as the two buildings we will be using are not near each other. If you have mobility concerns, please request a parking placard when you send in your reservation. Cell phone service at the site can be spotty, depending on one’s carrier.

Classes

Saturday Morning:
From Picture to Pattern, THL Jaqueline de Molieres
Tools and Materials, Lady Etain ingen Ruaidri
Applique, Mistress Antoinette de la Croix
The Oxburgh Hangings, Mistress Briony of Chatham

Saturday Afternoon “Kit” Classes:
Whitework, Mistress Caterina Giaocchini
Embroidered Hoods, Mistress Antoinette de la Croix and Hrefna fruthikona Thorgrimsdottir
Pleating, Mistress Fredeburg von Katzenellenbogen
German Brick Stitch, Lady Elizabet Marshall

Each “Kit” class is 3 hours long and will be limited to a small number of students. Kits will contain specialty supplies and period materials needed to complete the class project. (Kit classes may require more equipment; if needed, you will be notified of additional items to bring after you have pre-registered.) Details about the kits can be found on the event website.

Schedule & Activities
Friday:
5:00 PM
Troll opens; check in at Edna Sheary Lodge
8:30 PM
What’s in Your Toolbox? A roundtable discussion about favorite tools and suppliers.
Saturday:
8:00 AM
Troll re-opens; check in at the Dining Hall
8:30 – 9:30
Breakfast
All day
Embroidery Display Area: Display your work, for feedback & inspiration.
Library
10:00 – 11:00
Keynote Address: History of Embroidery
11:00 – noon
Morning Classes
noon – 1:00
Lunch
1:00 – 4:00
Afternoon Classes (Students must pre-register for “Kit” classes by 2/12/16.)
4:00 – 4:30
Tea
4:30 – 6:00
Visit embroidery displays, check out the library, stitch and chat, relax …
6:00 – 7:00
Supper
7:00 till …
Roundtable Topics **
Sunday:
8:30 – 10:30
Breakfast / Research and documentation can help you take your work to the next level. Two Laurels will share their know-how over breakfast.
11:00
Site Closes

** Roundtable Topics:
Show-n-Tell (Bring the most beautiful thing you’ve ever made, bring a project you want to make but haven’t gotten the courage to start, … )
Athena’s Thimble (EK Embroiderers’ Guild: What they do, how it works, etc.)
Using the Embroidery Rubric to Judge/Improve Your Work

What to Bring:
Bring scissors, an embroidery hoop, and (if possible) your favorite lamp/lighting device with extension cords.

In addition, please bring items for the Embroidery Display and to share during Show-n-Tell.

We invite all attending to bring relevant books from their personal libraries to contribute to an event reference library. The library will be staffed, and books will not leave the library area.

Please DO NOT bring alcohol, as the Boy Scouts have a strict no alcohol policy for those who use the camp. Nor do they permit pets on site or smoking in any of the buildings. Do not jeopardize our future use of the site by violating their policies. If we find that you have alcohol, you will be asked to leave the site with no refund.

Event Fees and Reservations
The cost for the weekend – which includes lodging in a heated cabin as well as breakfast, lunch, and supper on Saturday and breakfast on Sunday – is $25.  Those without proof of current Society membership must pay the $5 non-member surcharge at the door. Event reservations must be postmarked on or before Saturday, February 20, 2016. Make checks payable to “SCA PA, Inc. Shire of ACG”.

Along with your SCA and modern names, please include your email address so we can confirm receipt of your reservation. Include any food allergies with your reservation. If you have mobility concerns, request a parking placard to place in your vehicle after you check in.

Reservations should be sent to:
Maistresse Marguerite d’Honfleur
c/o Dawn Maneval
922 College Court
Lewisburg, PA 17837

“Kit” Class Fees and Preregistration
Upon receipt of your event reservation, we will send you details for pre-registering for the “Kit” classes. Because each “Kit” class will be limited to a small number of students, pre-registration is required. Students must pre-pay for their class kit; class rosters will be filled based on the order in which payment is received. To give the instructors sufficient time to acquire the materials and assemble the required number of kits, payment for the kits must be received by the Class Coordinator on or before February 12, 2016.

Refund Policy
Because the site requires us to pay the rental fee in full well before the event, we must ask our guests to reserve in advance. If you request a refund of your event registration prior to March 1, we will refund your event fee. On or after March 1, we can only refund your event fee if we have sufficient attendees to break even.

If you have paid for a kit, we will refund the cost of the kit if we are able to re-sell it. If we cannot re-sell your kit, we will mail it to you after the event.

Lodging and Parking
The heated sleeping cabin (Edna Sheary Lodge) is accessible to those with mobility restrictions and has indoor bathrooms with bathroom with showers, toilets, sinks, and electricity. The cabin also has a kitchenette and a meeting room.

There are 32 individual cots (with mattresses) in 2 sleeping areas. Overnight guests should bring bedding (pillow, sleeping bag/sheets and blankets) and towels.

If you arrive on Friday night, drive to the Sheary Lodge to unload your gear. Parking spaces in front of the cabin will be reserved for those with mobility concerns.

If you arrive on Saturday, drive to the Dining Hall and check in. Parking spaces closest to the Dining Hall will be reserved for those with mobility concerns.

Meals
Saturday Breakfast: oatmeal & fixin’s bar, yogurt & fruit, tea, coffee
Lunch: TBA
Tea: TBA
Supper: TBA
Sunday Breakfast: scrambled eggs, pancakes, tea, coffee

Merchants
Merchants, please contact the Autocrat for details about space.

Contacts
The Autocrat for the event is Mistress Alicia Langland (hutchnsn@bucknell.edu) (mka Della Hutchison, 1194 Marshall S., Milton PA 17847; 570-742-4567)
The Head Cook is TBA.
The Reservations Clerk is Maistresse Marguerite d’Honfleur. She can be reached at dmaneval@bucknell.edu or 570-523-7372

Directions
According to Google maps, we’re about 4.5 hours (or less) from almost everywhere! Abhainn Ciach Ghlais is truly the heart of Æthelmearc!

Guests coming from the East or West will probably travel on Route 80 to Route 15 to Route 45 to Route 235. Guests coming from the North will probably travel on Route 15.

From State College: Find your best route to Route 45 East. Follow Route 45 East through the Hairy Johns State Forest. Just past the Laurelton State School (there will be many large stone buildings and well-kept ground on the left), turn right onto Route 235 South. Follow from ** below.

 From the East, North, and parts farther west: Find your best route to Route I-80. Take Exit 210 A, Route 15 South, to Lewisburg. Stay on Route 15 S for about 7 miles; you will come to the intersection of Routes 15 and 45 at a light. Turn right onto Route 45 West. Continue from the * below.

From the South: Find your best route to Route 15 North. In Lewisburg, you will come to the intersection of Routes 15 and 45 at a light. Turn left onto Route 45 West. Continue from the * below.

* Proceed west on Route 45 West for about 17 miles, passing through the towns of Mifflinburg and Hartleton (follow speed limits here). At the intersection of Route 235 South, turn left.

** From this turn, follow signs for 235 South for approximately 3 miles through Laurelton (last chance for food, gas, and ATM) and Glen Iron. The road makes several 90-degree turns; just before the last one, you will pass the West End Fire Company on your left.

Turn right onto Creek Road at the 4-way intersection past this last 90-degree turn. Penns Creek should be on your left. Stay on this road for approximately three miles; you will pass a large 3 story stone house with three arches, on your right, at this point you are about one mile from the Camp.

After you cross the bridge over Penns Creek, Penns Creek Campground will be on your right –turn right at the sign for Thomas Dam Road/Boy Scout Camp.

Camp Karoondinha is on the left, up the hill. The Dining Hall is the large stone building with 3 flagpoles in front. To get to the Edna Sheary Lodge, continue up the hill past the Dining Hall. Sheary Lodge is located in the wooded area just past the large field on the right. Site Restrictions (to top)

Drivers are asked to use their flashers and to travel at the posted 10 miles per hour.

 


Categories: SCA news sites

Highlights of the January Board of Directors Meeting

East Kingdom Gazette - Sun, 2016-01-17 18:53

These updates have been gleaned from Kelly Magill’s updates posted on the Society Seneschal’s web page. You can view the originals by starting with this link: January 2016 Board Meeting Updates

These are not official minutes of the meeting, and should be treated as unofficial until any changes involved are announced from more formal sources.

Highlights, selected for relevance to the East:

  • Mr. Richard Sherman from Hawaii is our new Director Elect. Mr. Sherman is known in the Society as THL William Walworth de Durham, from the Kingdom of Caid. You can view his full biography here: Board Member Biographies
  • The Board of Directors is still seeking applicants for the position of President of SCA, Inc. Details on the position can be found here: SCA President Job Posting
  • Several Marshal Handbooks have been updated. Updates should be posted on-line by the relevant officers in due course. [Editor’s note: it’s not clear if these are the handbooks mentioned later, or in addition to those.]
  •  A communications proposal was submitted by the Society Publications Director. After discussion, the Board has decided to table it “for more work and for more strategic planning for the future of communications.”

Director Chele Martines, the Board Ombudsman for Publications,  offered the following statement: “We would like to thank Gloria and her team for their work on the communication proposal. Gloria’s vision for moving SCA communications into the 21st-century is inspiring. We are currently evaluating SCA.org and how we can improve the site and incorporate many of the items listed in Gloria’s proposal. We look forward to working with her and her team on this endeavor.”

  • The Board has decided to allow electronic newsletter access for people with family memberships as well as the primary member.
  • Event Module – “We are close to do the final stages of testing. Request will go out for testing pool help via the Kingdoms Seneschals shortly. It’s hopeful that it will be up and running in early spring.” [Editor’s note: we believe this refers to a plan discussed at the Q4 2015 Board meeting to create a system for pre-registering via the SCA’s own web site. See Director Andrew Coleman’s comments, quoted in this report on that meeting, under the Paypal Acceptance discussion: Aethelmearc Gazette reports on the Oct. 2015 Board Meeting]
  • The Board has identified a Canadian company to handle Canadian Background checks. Final vetting is expected to be completed with the next 15 business days, after which more details will be announced.
  • A new Seige Engines handbook was presented and has been approved.
  • A revision to the Youth Combat Handbook was presents and approved by the Board.
  • Potential Rate Change Proposal – “With the increasing costs of services, IT infrastructure and insurance for SCA Inc  to run, a proposal has been put forth.  Discussions are happening as to how to implement. No decision has been made and the topic has been remanded for further discussion and further research. Further communications will be forthcoming as new information is available.”
  • The list of Board Meet and Greet sessions has been updated. Upcoming in 2016 are one at Gulf Wars, one at the 50 Year Celebration, and an initial event still to be determined. One will also be held at Market Day at Birka in Stonemarche in 2017. [Editor’s note: Typically these do not involve the entire Board attending. It is more likely to be two or three representatives, giving the populace a chance to ask questions and raise concerns in an informal setting.]
  • The Board continues to seek additional nominees for Board positions, and commentary up those already under consideration.  The list of nominees is available here: Current Board Nominees
  • future board meeting dates:
    • April 23, 2016 – Milpitas, CA
    • July 16, 2016 – Milpitas, CA
    • October 22, 2016 – Milpitas, CA


Filed under: Corporate Tagged: Board Meeting, publications, Siege, youth combat

On Target: Archery Poker

AEthelmearc Gazette - Sat, 2016-01-16 19:06

By THLord Deryk Archer 

I just want to say I hope everybody had an awesome New Year! I want to start the year by bringing back an old game: archery poker. I like to cut the cards in half to make the game quite challenging. The cards are glued to a cardboard backing.

There are two ways to set up the board. One is to just throw the cards down and spread them out however they land.

The other method is to organize them in 6 columns of 9. Since that makes 54 cards, you have to add the two jokers as wild cards.

The way I like to set up the board is to put the four aces in the four corners. Also, make sure there’s plenty of room between the cards so an arrow cannot hit two cards at the same time. This also means shooters may miss cards completely.

Now you have to decide what game of poker you wish to play. I prefer five card draw, which means each archer gets 8 arrows and throws out the three least valuable shots. An archer may not score on the same card twice in a given round.

This is an all-day game – the archers shoot until they get a hand they like and then turn the hand in to the Marshall in charge. The archer may not turn in another hand unless he is knocked off by another shooter. If he’s outshot, then he may shoot again for a higher hand. The scoring hands are as follows in ascending order of value:

  • 1 pair
  • 2 pair
  • 3 of a kind
  • a straight
  • a flush
  • a full house
  • four of a kind
  • a straight flush
  • a Royal flush
  • five-of-a-kind (only in a wildcard game)

This month’s safety tip: stay in shape! Every day, draw the bow at least 10 times and hold it for a 5-count each time you draw. This will keep those muscles in your back and arms in shape. Remember not to dry fire it (loose the string without an arrow on it).

Also, I would like to say that at this year’s spring archery muster at Their Highnesses’ castle, we will be repelling an  invading army. This year’s moving target will be a man coming up a ladder to take the wall, so you’ll get to shoot him down.

As always, I look forward to some feedback. If there’s something you need to know, or would like to see or shoot at, please feel free to ask me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/joseph.bartlow.

Til next time, in service.

THL Deryk


Categories: SCA news sites

Live Updates from Today’s BoD Meeting

AEthelmearc Gazette - Sat, 2016-01-16 11:56

Regular updates as they happen from today’s SCA Board Meeting in Milpitas, CA will be published here:

LIVE MEETING UPDATES

The tentative agenda is already posted.

Meeting begins at 9 a.m. PST.


Categories: SCA news sites

The 2016 Pent Website is Up!

AEthelmearc Gazette - Fri, 2016-01-15 11:16

The 2016 Ice Dragon Pentathlon website is now live! You can find it here. Pre-registration is also open.

There will be a lot more information coming your way this month, but this will give you all a great A&S start!

There are many changes to the Pent this year, so check out the pages. We hope to see entries from our own Kingdom as well as other Kingdoms throughout the Known World!

 


Categories: SCA news sites

Heavy & Youth Muster on February 14

AEthelmearc Gazette - Thu, 2016-01-14 19:40

Greetings all Heavy and Youth Fighters!

Once again, we invite all to brave the wintry cold and fight singles and then melee all afternoon on St. Valentine’s Day!

The Muster will run from 1 to 5pm on Sunday, Feb. 14 this year (we changed our initial choice of date to avoid the Superbowl). The location is the same as in previous years: Marshall Elementary School gym at 5135 Wexford Run Rd, Wexford PA 15090. Your hosting marshals are Your Royal Highnessess, Byron and Ariella (caram@pitt.edu or 724-933-4661). Be prompt for the one-on-one fighting, followed by melees in a gym large enough for at least 70 fighters.

Youth Fighting will run from 1pm to 3pm. Adult sparring marshals, if you were authorized two or more years ago, this is a good opportunity to renew your authorization to fight against youth under the supervision of a Youth Combat Marshal. Adult fighters who wish to become sparring marshals should contact the Kingdom Youth Combat Marshal, Sir Thorgrim Skullsplitter. For more information on becoming a sparring marshal, see the Æthelmearc Youth Combat website.

Please no smoking on school property, soft-soled shoes on the gym floor, and only water in the gym and outside hallway, which became the kids’ hangout/arts area last year.

Donations are appreciated to defray the cost of gym rental. We are looking forward to seeing everyone!

Yours In Service,
Byron and Ariella, Prince and Princess


Categories: SCA news sites

Request from the 50th Anniversary Display Committee / Demande de la part du Comité d’Exposition 50ième Anniversaire du Royaume de l’Est

East Kingdom Gazette - Wed, 2016-01-13 22:18

En françis

Calling for Content for the East Kingdom 50th Anniversary Displa

With less than six months to go, the East Kingdom 50th Anniversary Display Committee is asking all members of the populace to begin submitting photos to be included in the exhibit. The booth design is based on a traveling art exhibit from a major East Coast museum and will feature several monitors filled with digital art, reflecting the rich, artistic diversity found in the Kingdom. Along with significant historic documents and related items, the exhibit will focus on the amazing array of scrolls that have always played an important role in the life of the Kingdom. Additionally, there will be space for images of old and new East Kingdom events, and the wide variety of beautiful relics constantly being created.

The committee is asking everyone to please submit photos of scrolls, old and new East Kingdom events, and any and all creative projects you have made, received, or acquired, as long as they have been made by someone within the Kingdom.

“We are constantly making beautiful items and giving them away. The East Kingdom is truly fortunate to have so many talented people. It’s everywhere… needle-workers, weavers, woodworkers, metalworkers, glassworkers, fighters with great kits, the list can go on and on,” says Countess Marguerite inghean Lachlainn, Chair of the Committee. “What a great way to honor someone, what a fabulous way to brag.” Members of the Committee will be on hand at both Twelfth Night, January 16th, and The Market Day at Birka, January 29 and 30, with a scanner to digitize any old photos you may have.

Submission and questions should be sent to- EK 50th. Many thanks for your service to the East Kingdom.

En français
Traduction par Behi Kirsa Oyutai

Avec maintenant moins de six mois à patienter, le Comité d’Exposition 50ième anniversaire du Royaume de l’Est demande à tous les membres de la population de commencer à soumettre des photos pour l’exposition. Le design du kiosque est basé sur une exposition ambulante d’un musée majeur de la côte est, et mets en vedette plusieurs écrans remplis d’art numérique, reflétant la riche diversité artistique de notre Royaume. En plus de documents historiques et items significatifs, l’exposition mettra l’accent sur les incroyables parchemins qui ont toujours joué un rôle prédominant dans la vie du Royaume. Additionnellement, de l’espace sera disponible pour des images d’anciens ou nouveaux événements du Royaume de l’Est, ainsi que la grande variété d’extraordinaires reliques constamment créées. Le comité demande à tous de soumettre des photos de parchemins, d’anciens et de nouveaux événements de l’Est, et de projets créatifs que vous avez faits, reçus ou acquis, tant qu’ils ont été fabriqués par quelqu’un de notre Royaume.

“Nous fabriquons constamment de merveilleuses choses, pour ensuite les donner. Le Royaume de l’Est est réellement fortuné d’avoir autant de personnes talentueuses. Elles sont partout… les travailleurs de l’aiguille, les tisseurs, les travailleurs du bois, du métal, du verre, les combattants avec d’impressionnantes armures, la liste pourrait continuer longtemps,” dit la Comtesse Marguerite inghean Lachlainn, Présidente du Comité. “Quelle merveilleuse façon d’honorer quelqu’un, quelle façon fabuleuse de se vanter.” Les membres du Comité seront présents à la Nuit des Rois (Twelfth Night), le 16 janvier, et au Jour de Marché à Birka (The Market Day at Birka), les 29 et 30 janvier, avec un scanner pour numériser de vieilles photos, si vous en avez. Les soumissions et les questions devraient être envoyées à – ek50thsca@gmail.com.

Merci beaucoup de votre service pour le Royaume de l’Est


Filed under: En français, Tidings Tagged: 50th Anniversary, a&s

Calling All Choral Singers for Coronation!

AEthelmearc Gazette - Wed, 2016-01-13 12:54

From Mistress Arianna of Wynthrope, greetings unto the singers of Æthelmearc!

The Coronation of Their Highnesses, Byron and Ariella, may seem far distant, but it less than three months away. Their Highnesses are planning an authentic late-14th century English coronation ceremony, which requires a good deal of choral music. I have been asked to coordinate the choir for this exciting event.

If you attended the Coronation of Duke Maynard and Duchess Liadain three years ago in Heronter, you may recall the choir’s participation in that ceremony. This one will be similar, but English instead of German, and the music will be from about 175 years earlier. Like that coronation, this ceremony is being designed by ceremonial scholar Master Steffan ap Cenydd of the East Kingdom in collaboration with Their Highnesses and other gentles.

The choir will be singing several fairly straight-forward monophonic chant pieces in Latin, but the ceremony’s recessional will be more complex: an excerpt from the Gloria of Guillaume de Machaut’s Messe de Notre Dame. This piece will be challenging but lots of fun! You can listen to it here. We will be singing just the first 2 minutes of the piece.

The performance will be anchored by the Debatable Choir, but we invite singers from throughout the Kingdom to join us! I will provide not only sheet music but also electronic audio files you can use to learn your part. I also hope to have some rehearsals at events around the Kingdom prior to Coronation, including Ice Dragon.

If you are interested in singing with us at Coronation on April 9 in the Shire of Gryffyn’s Keep, please contact me at ariannawyn@gmail.com.


Categories: SCA news sites

Sterlynge Schola Class Schedule is Full of Intriguing Choices

AEthelmearc Gazette - Tue, 2016-01-12 19:59

14th century scholars, image from Grandes Chronique de France. Don’t worry, Schola students will NOT be required to wear robes and tonsures, unless they really want to do so. There will also be no need to sit on the floor, unless the spirit moves you.

Let the word go forth that the Shire of Sterlynge Vayle will be hosting The Sterlynge Schola on January 16, 2016 At the Trinity Memorial Church at 44 Main St., Binghamton NY 13904.

The newly minted Baroness Nest ferch Rhys, Dean of Classes, has announced the following interesting line up, from sausages to skewering enemies. Read on to find something you’d love to learn:

Baroness Nest wrote:  “At long last – the class schedule!”

10:00AM:
-The Roma in the SCA Time Period
-Just a Simple Sling (Donations for materials accepted, limit 15)
-I’m allergic to x, can you accommodate me?

11:00 AM
-The Pavee or Irish Travelers
-So you want to Throw WHAT??!!
-Advanced Retaining for Everyone
-Of Charcoal and Lye

12:00 – LUNCH

Baroness Nest, photo courtesy of The Lady Jinx

 

1:00PM

-Early Byzantium
-SCA Sign Language
-Samurai Chef
-Don Po’s Guide to Fencing

2:00 PM
-Byzantium in its Heyday
-Reinventing Events: A Round Table Discussion
-Beginning Embroidery
-The Wurst Workshop ($5 fee, limit 12)

3:00 PM
-Seeds in the Heart: Writing Japanese Poetry ($1 for handout)
-SCA Photography
-Care and Feeding of Edged Weapons
-Here’s a Sword, now Kill!

4:00 PM
-Schtick 101
-But that’s not Period!

 

Image courtesy of the Medieval and Renaissance Graduate Student Association of Ohio State University. See how happy you’ll be, just like these students, learning about historical topics at Sterlynge Schola?

Bardic insanity will happen as well. – time(s) and place(s) to be determined!”

The event listing can be found here. The forecast for the day is looking clear.  Shake off that temporary winter blahs, because Sterlynge Schola promises to be an event to rival those fabulous old-time SCA celebrations. We look forward to seeing you there!

 

 


Categories: SCA news sites